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(Shreveport Times)   Louisiana prosecutors file a Motion of "Whoops Our bad" to free a man who has spent the last 30 years on death row for a 1983 murder he's always claimed he didn't commit   (shreveporttimes.com) divider line 79
    More: Followup, Glenn Ford, death row, prosecutors, murders, Isadore Rozeman, motions, Louisiana Supreme Court, Caddo Parish  
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4614 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Mar 2014 at 12:30 PM (40 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-11 12:35:44 PM  
But our justice system needs the death penalty, as a deterrent to show people who don't commit crimes that they shouldn't commit crimes, otherwise this will happen to you... oh.
 
2014-03-11 12:35:54 PM  
Besides the point: why would you need 30 years to hang someone?
 
2014-03-11 12:36:08 PM  
Hello, payday.
Good on Shreveport to own up to the mistake, but damn shame it had to take so long.
 
2014-03-11 12:37:22 PM  
Here's the real killer (Glenn Ford)
www.classichollywoodbios.com
 
2014-03-11 12:37:56 PM  
Good on them for trying to make this right, but  Smitty, everyone says they're innocent.
 
2014-03-11 12:38:02 PM  
Know what? it must be snowing in hell, because I actually do believe an article on Fark has changed my mind about capital punishment. It's just been too many for me to feel comfortable with it.

So, I'm now a life in prison guy. Just keep the cement benches for them to sleep on, just in case.
 
2014-03-11 12:38:18 PM  
Angola is a third world prison.  Louisiana is a third world state.  This case however is not anomalous in the US as a whole.

/Louisiana.  Not even once.
 
2014-03-11 12:38:27 PM  
Caddo Parish prosecutors on Thursday filed a motion to vacate the first-degree murder conviction and death sentence of Glenn Ford because of undisclosed evidence indicating he was neither present nor a participant of the robbery and murder of 56-year-old jeweler and watchmaker Isadore Rozeman on Nov. 5, 1983.

upload.wikimedia.org

I thought that he died in 2006.
/Why would Superman's father need to rob a store, anyway?
 
2014-03-11 12:39:06 PM  

mayIFark: Besides the point: why would you need 30 years to hang someone?


Because it takes 30 years to discover you' re wrong
 
2014-03-11 12:40:09 PM  

mayIFark: Besides the point: why would you need 30 years to hang someone?


Yes, it would've been much better if we had just killed an innocent man.
 
2014-03-11 12:41:47 PM  

mayIFark: Besides the point: why would you need 30 years to hang someone?


Couldn't find anyone who knew how to read the picture book to make the knot.
 
2014-03-11 12:41:54 PM  
I think if a person that was on death row was eventually found not-guilty and released, they should still give him a last-dinner style meal. That would probably be the only thing to look forward to on death row, and then to have that taken away seems like it would be a bit of a let down.
 
2014-03-11 12:43:35 PM  
I have no problem with handing him a bullwhip and letting him go to town on the DA and the prosecutors and judge.
 
2014-03-11 12:44:36 PM  

Shark Slave: I think if a person that was on death row was eventually found not-guilty and released, they should still give him a last-dinner style meal. That would probably be the only thing to look forward to on death row, and then to have that taken away seems like it would be a bit of a let down.


Deep Thoughts by Jack Handy.
 
2014-03-11 12:45:23 PM  
Such is the state of these stories that I'm actually impressed with the prosecution here for realizing they botched it.

In the last case I read on Fark, a man was convicted of rape/murder based on his lost jacket being found near the woman's body in the woods.  Years later, when the fluids inside her were tested and the DNA wasn't his, the prosecution tried to claim that the ~80 year old woman had casual sex with some other guy (therefore the DNA was irrelevant), but they totally definitely prosecuted the right person.
 
2014-03-11 12:46:53 PM  
Waiting for all the law-and-order types to defend the death penalty.  This guy should have died long ago, right?  What I waste of tax payer money to keep some guy alive for 30 years when he's been convicted to die.  The system has not only failed this man but failed the tax payers as well.  The death penalty is no deterrent if you get to live for 30 years after you've been sentenced.
 
2014-03-11 12:47:31 PM  

ikanreed: mayIFark: Besides the point: why would you need 30 years to hang someone?

Yes, it would've been much better if we had just killed an innocent man.


Texas would have murdered him years ago.
 
2014-03-11 12:50:45 PM  

DarkVader: ikanreed: mayIFark: Besides the point: why would you need 30 years to hang someone?

Yes, it would've been much better if we had just killed an innocent man.

Texas would have murdered him years ago.



They still might.  With Texas, ya never know.
 
2014-03-11 12:51:46 PM  

SordidEuphemism: Hello, payday.
Good on Shreveport to own up to the mistake, but damn shame it had to take so long.


What payday? He already got 30 years of free room and board. Deadbeats gaming the system. SMH
 
2014-03-11 12:51:48 PM  

balki1867: Such is the state of these stories that I'm actually impressed with the prosecution here for realizing they botched it.

In the last case I read on Fark, a man was convicted of rape/murder based on his lost jacket being found near the woman's body in the woods.  Years later, when the fluids inside her were tested and the DNA wasn't his, the prosecution tried to claim that the ~80 year old woman had casual sex with some other guy (therefore the DNA was irrelevant), but they totally definitely prosecuted the right person.



Yeah, it's awfully refreshing to see the Prosecutors own up to the mistakes of themselves (or their predecessors) and try to do the right thing.
 
2014-03-11 12:52:43 PM  
In thirty years, who or what group of convicts will we be looking at and just knowing they got railroaded?  Hispanics, gays, Mooslins, all of the above?
 
2014-03-11 12:54:01 PM  

cherryl taggart: In thirty years, who or what group of convicts will we be looking at and just knowing they got railroaded?  Hispanics, gays, Mooslins, all of the above?


Still blacks in the south mostly.  That's still hate target #1, even if the racists have learned to keep it on the down-low.
 
2014-03-11 12:54:58 PM  

mayIFark: Besides the point: why would you need 30 years to hang someone?


Because, thankfully, our legal system still has enough safeguards in place that an innocent man can sometimes stand up and scream "I didn't do it" long enough to get someone to listen.

Sometimes.

Which is why this story is going to the top of my "why capital punishment should be abolished" reading list.
 
2014-03-11 12:55:27 PM  

Shark Slave: I think if a person that was on death row was eventually found not-guilty and released, they should still give him a last-dinner style meal. That would probably be the only thing to look forward to on death row, and then to have that taken away seems like it would be a bit of a let down.


Texas, which invented last meals on death row, did away with them a couple years ago, after a state senator's outrage over a last meal that included TWO chicken fried stakes, a TRIPLE cheeseburger, and other a half dozen other items that he found excessive. Louisiana still has them though, and has a tradition of the warden joining the inmate for their meal.
 
2014-03-11 12:56:57 PM  
img.photobucket.com
 
2014-03-11 12:58:51 PM  
Wow, a prosecutor's office not fighting tooth and nail to keep an innocent man in jail? That polar vortex stuff must have reached hell.
 
2014-03-11 01:03:24 PM  

Shark Slave: I think if a person that was on death row was eventually found not-guilty and released, they should still give him a last-dinner style meal. That would probably be the only thing to look forward to on death row, and then to have that taken away seems like it would be a bit of a let down.


I think he should get to commit a crime suitable for 30 years in jail for free.
 
2014-03-11 01:05:00 PM  
3.bp.blogspot.com

RIP GLENN FORD
 
2014-03-11 01:07:13 PM  

spawn73: Shark Slave: I think if a person that was on death row was eventually found not-guilty and released, they should still give him a last-dinner style meal. That would probably be the only thing to look forward to on death row, and then to have that taken away seems like it would be a bit of a let down.

I think he should get to commit a crime suitable for 30 years in jail for free.


OK... we've heard from Ashley Judd... whaddayagot Egon??
 
2014-03-11 01:09:37 PM  
Huh...look at that.  The hometown making it to Fark.  And not for the worst reasons.  Granted, keeping an innocent man on Death Row for 30 years isnt a shining beacon of reason to live there....but it isn't Florida levels of bad either
 
2014-03-11 01:12:00 PM  
Ford, a black man, was convicted and sentenced to death by an all-white Caddo jury in the fall of 1984.

And there we go. Stay liberal, Shreveport times.
 
2014-03-11 01:13:28 PM  

ikanreed: mayIFark: Besides the point: why would you need 30 years to hang someone?

Yes, it would've been much better if we had just killed an innocent man.


No. My point is that why would you need 30 years?

At the point of finding out later that someone is not guilty, that is one of the main reason not to have capital punishment.
 
2014-03-11 01:16:38 PM  

Pincy: Waiting for all the law-and-order types to defend the death penalty.  This guy should have died long ago, right?  What I waste of tax payer money to keep some guy alive for 30 years when he's been convicted to die.  The system has not only failed this man but failed the tax payers as well.  The death penalty is no deterrent if you get to live for 30 years after you've been sentenced.


After having your life destroyed and losing 30 yrs of irreplaceable time I would hope the death option was still offered if they wanted it.
 
2014-03-11 01:17:54 PM  

the8re: Know what? it must be snowing in hell, because I actually do believe an article on Fark has changed my mind about capital punishment. It's just been too many for me to feel comfortable with it.

So, I'm now a life in prison guy. Just keep the cement benches for them to sleep on, just in case.


I was in Illinois, doing criminal defense work (in a law school clinic)  when the death penalty moratorium was imposed.   There were two things that triggered it: 1) a series of Chicago Tribune articles showing that in the past two decades Illinois had exonerated exactly as many death row inmates as they had executed- 13 each, 2) an anti-death penalty group staged a "march of the exonerated" having the men freed from death row walk in relay carrying a petition to end the death penalty from Chicago to Springfield.  The man they chose for the last leg who delivered the petition into Gov. Ryan's hands was a man who had been literally hours away from execution when the evidence that exonerated him came to light.   Someone standing next to Ryan at the time told me he was visibly  shaken on meeting the man and kept muttering "we measured him for his coffin"

Even for a corrupt dirtbag like Ryan, that was too much, and the Death Penalty effectively ended in Illinois that day.


My own experience defending death row inmates also converted me from mildly in favor to vehemently opposed.  Even if you did not share my moral qualms about the state intentionally ending a human life, if you experience first hand, I can not imagine you could ever come away with any impression other than that the criminal justice system is FAR to broken to ever allow the kind of certainty and fairness the Death penalty demands
 
2014-03-11 01:34:35 PM  
30 years.

I can't conceive of what 30 years of prison did to the dude... and what exoneration feels like. And now he's past retirement age.
What the fark is he going to do?
 
2014-03-11 01:35:40 PM  

Magorn: I can not imagine you could ever come away with any impression other than that the criminal justice system is FAR to broken to ever allow th


shiat man, i'm under the impression that the criminal justice system cannot handle ANYTHING, let alone the death penalty.
 
2014-03-11 01:38:24 PM  

Magorn: the8re: Know what? it must be snowing in hell, because I actually do believe an article on Fark has changed my mind about capital punishment. It's just been too many for me to feel comfortable with it.

So, I'm now a life in prison guy. Just keep the cement benches for them to sleep on, just in case.

I was in Illinois, doing criminal defense work (in a law school clinic)  when the death penalty moratorium was imposed.   There were two things that triggered it: 1) a series of Chicago Tribune articles showing that in the past two decades Illinois had exonerated exactly as many death row inmates as they had executed- 13 each, 2) an anti-death penalty group staged a "march of the exonerated" having the men freed from death row walk in relay carrying a petition to end the death penalty from Chicago to Springfield.  The man they chose for the last leg who delivered the petition into Gov. Ryan's hands was a man who had been literally hours away from execution when the evidence that exonerated him came to light.   Someone standing next to Ryan at the time told me he was visibly  shaken on meeting the man and kept muttering "we measured him for his coffin"

Even for a corrupt dirtbag like Ryan, that was too much, and the Death Penalty effectively ended in Illinois that day.


My own experience defending death row inmates also converted me from mildly in favor to vehemently opposed.  Even if you did not share my moral qualms about the state intentionally ending a human life, if you experience first hand, I can not imagine you could ever come away with any impression other than that the criminal justice system is FAR to broken to ever allow the kind of certainty and fairness the Death penalty demands


I strongly suggest that you write an article about your experience and sent it to local newspapers.
 
2014-03-11 01:41:26 PM  
I'm sure they'll give him a gift certificate to Popeye's for his trouble.
 
2014-03-11 01:41:39 PM  

DarkSoulNoHope: But our justice system needs the death penalty, as a deterrent to show people who don't commit crimes that they shouldn't commit crimes, otherwise this will happen to you... oh.


Oy Vey! Not this Shvit again.

Listen, the punishment for a crime is supposed to be so horrible that it deters the criminals.  Death isn't what is merited here.  Torture the bastard until he confesses to something.  Jesus Christ, declaring that a punishment should fit the crime and decrying cruel and unusual punishment was part of the problem.

I promise, even small crimes would stop if the penalty for the few poor schmucks who get caught was severe enough.  No turn signal?  You get a finger cut off.  Is that all four, I guess your thumb is next, good luck driving anymore.  I promise just the thought of that penalty, and knowing from the news that it happened to even one person would straighten out the others who don't use it.  Same with murder, but you have to go beyond killing the killer back if you want to scare them out of it.  America no longer has the balls to properly torture someone though.
 
2014-03-11 01:42:36 PM  

starsrift: 30 years.

I can't conceive of what 30 years of prison did to the dude... and what exoneration feels like. And now he's past retirement age.
What the fark is he going to do?


Talk shows. I see Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert asking him to be on their shows. I see a 60 Minutes story.
Movies. I'm sure Steve McQueen (12 Years a Slave) already has "30 Years a Prisoner" in the first draft stage.
Travel. The state of LA has just paid for this man to go on a trip around the world.
 
2014-03-11 01:43:41 PM  

ikanreed: mayIFark: Besides the point: why would you need 30 years to hang someone?

Yes, it would've been much better if we had just killed an innocent man.


Well, if we had, we might be able to hold the prosecutors responsible for his death, possibly even giving them the death penalty themselves. Other prosecutors would look at this case as a warning to do their job right, and as a result, Joe Blow might not be incorrectly sentenced tomorrow, nor Jon James the day after. Nor hundreds of others over the years.

But now, people will just say "well, it's not like anyone died or anything. There's no need to make an example of the prosecutors..."
 
2014-03-11 01:43:48 PM  

Gonz: mayIFark: Besides the point: why would you need 30 years to hang someone?

Because, thankfully, our legal system still has enough safeguards in place that an innocent man can sometimes stand up and scream "I didn't do it" long enough to get someone to listen.

Sometimes.

Which is why this story is going to the top of my "why capital punishment should be abolished" reading list.


What are you talking about; he wasn't executed, was he? The system obviously works flawlessly.
 
2014-03-11 01:45:23 PM  

Magorn: My own experience defending death row inmates also converted me from mildly in favor to vehemently opposed.  Even if you did not share my moral qualms about the state intentionally ending a human life, if you experience first hand, I can not imagine you could ever come away with any impression other than that the criminal justice system is FAR too broken to ever allow the kind of certainty and fairness the Death penalty demands


That's a key point for me as well.  Cases go to trial because the evidence isn't completely unambiguous.  If there was no question as to guilt then there's a financial incentive for the state to offer a non-capital charge to which the suspect can plead guilty (of course there are plenty of innocent people in prison because they were scared into avoiding trial and a harsher sentence).  Where there's uncertainty there's room for a convincing argument to be made either way, and always the possibility that the decision can be changed later.  You can release someone early, but you can't undo killing them.

As for the arguments that life in prison is worse than death, my suggestion is a mechanism allowing for assisted suicide for anyone in prison (essentially including the option for assisted suicide as part of standard medical and mental health care for all inmates).  You could have a ridiculously elaborate screening and consent process that would still cost way less than appeals - essentially replacing a revaluation of guilt, weighing all sorts of external factors, to simply an evaluation of sanity and competence to make the decision to end one's own life.  Ironically there may be a greater moral stigma against suicide than there is against execution, so it's obviously a tough sell.
 
2014-03-11 01:46:39 PM  

Pincy: Waiting for all the law-and-order types to defend the death penalty.  This guy should have died long ago, right?  What I waste of tax payer money to keep some guy alive for 30 years when he's been convicted to die.  The system has not only failed this man but failed the tax payers as well.  The death penalty is no deterrent if you get to live for 30 years after you've been sentenced.


Once again, I have to point out that the death penalty really wouldn't deter anything that 10 years in the joint doesn't. Actual murderers either have really piss-poor impulse control, or think they're too clever to ever be caught. There are also a few who, for some weird reason, actually seem to want the death penalty. How do I know? I worked maintenance in a prison for a while at one point. Saw and heard some interesting things. Mind you, I'm not totally opposed to the death penalty. I just think it should only be applied to those who have already received life without, and are continuing patterns of behavior that result in additional deaths or otherwise render the prison system more dangerous than need be. Currently, we export shot-callers who have become too troublesome to other institutions or other prison systems, where they can then recruit new inmates and expand their criminal enterprise. It would be much better if we could just eliminate the farkers entirely.
 
2014-03-11 01:47:10 PM  
...and this is, once again, why I support our governor's suspension of the death penalty. Until we can be sure, absolutely sure, that a person deserves to die for the crime he or she committed, then no one should die. I'd rather put hundreds of heinous scumbags behind bars for life without parole than kill 1 innocent person.
 
2014-03-11 01:50:54 PM  

FormlessOne: ...and this is, once again, why I support our governor's suspension of the death penalty. Until we can be sure, absolutely sure, that a person deserves to die for the crime he or she committed, then no one should die. I'd rather put hundreds of heinous scumbags behind bars for life without parole than kill 1 innocent person.


The whole debate ends right at this line of reasoning.  There are some people who think "Life in prison isn't enough" for some unspecified reason.  That's all that divides you from the other people.  They think somehow killing a person achieves some unspoken(or in the case of deterrence, undemonstrated) goal.
 
2014-03-11 01:55:08 PM  
Why is it significant that he has always claimed to be innocent?  The jails are full of men that claim to be innocent.  So is hell.
 
2014-03-11 02:06:07 PM  

TheWhoppah: Why is it significant that he has always claimed to be innocent?  The jails are full of men that claim to be innocent.  So is hell.


There are plenty of men in jail who will admit to wrongdoing. But, they are only in jail because their lawyer f*cked them.
 
2014-03-11 02:07:57 PM  

EggSniper: Magorn: My own experience defending death row inmates also converted me from mildly in favor to vehemently opposed.  Even if you did not share my moral qualms about the state intentionally ending a human life, if you experience first hand, I can not imagine you could ever come away with any impression other than that the criminal justice system is FAR too broken to ever allow the kind of certainty and fairness the Death penalty demands

That's a key point for me as well.  Cases go to trial because the evidence isn't completely unambiguous.  If there was no question as to guilt then there's a financial incentive for the state to offer a non-capital charge to which the suspect can plead guilty (of course there are plenty of innocent people in prison because they were scared into avoiding trial and a harsher sentence).  Where there's uncertainty there's room for a convincing argument to be made either way, and always the possibility that the decision can be changed later.  You can release someone early, but you can't undo killing them.

As for the arguments that life in prison is worse than death, my suggestion is a mechanism allowing for assisted suicide for anyone in prison (essentially including the option for assisted suicide as part of standard medical and mental health care for all inmates).  You could have a ridiculously elaborate screening and consent process that would still cost way less than appeals - essentially replacing a revaluation of guilt, weighing all sorts of external factors, to simply an evaluation of sanity and competence to make the decision to end one's own life.  Ironically there may be a greater moral stigma against suicide than there is against execution, so it's obviously a tough sell.


Bingo.  I like to say that those who get the death penalty with a few exceptions fall into three main categories:

1) Those who either did not do it, or a mentally ill enough to BELIEVE they did not do it
2) Those against who the case for their guilt is very weak or in some way suspect
3) those with VERY bad lawyers

Here's the thing, if the case against you is strong, and you know you are guilty and are a rational person, in a capital case you will look for a plea deal. And with a few high-profile exceptions like the Boston Bomber or Timothy McVeigh, the prosecutor WILL offer that deal because they know, that no matter how strong the evidence is, crazy shiat can happen in a courtroom, or in the jury room, and while most people will be satisfied if you get life in prison for a notorious or heinous killer,   you'll be out of a job if you take a case like that to trial and the bad guy walks.

So unless your lawyer is lousy, almost all capital eligible cases (and indeed 90% of all criminal cases) end in a plea deal.

Now if the evidence isn't strong and the case isn;t good, there is a chance that even a rational, well-represented guilty man would decide to take thier chances at trial, which is why so many capital cases do seem to be MORE ambiguous as to the defendant's guilt  than average criminal cases not less

In my limited experience with DP cases, I've met an actual murderer who was framed for a second murder by the cops to make him DP eligible (something that was only able to be conclusively proven a few years ago, after the real murderer let his attorneys produce the murder weapon after he died)  and he has spent 20 years on death row (but will never get out of jail because of the murder he DID commit)

Two men who were obscenely innocent but the victim of corrupt small town goings on involving organized crime (48 hours did a special on the case at one point)   and yet spent more than 20 years each on death row.

A Man who may or may not have committed his crime, but believed  he was dying of AIDS and that he had fatally infected his girlfriend , ater finding out he was HIV+ just before trial, and whose lawyer had interviewed for a position at the prosecutor's office just before taking the case and put on virtually NO defense.

A man whose confession was literally tortured out of him by a police captain (a fact that earned him $3 million later one)

etc etc

In all that time I never met ONE unambiguously guilty man on death row.   I DID met plenty of murderous awful scumbags doing life, but none on the Row
 
2014-03-11 02:08:19 PM  

twiztedjustin: Ford, a black man, was convicted and sentenced to death by an all-white Caddo jury in the fall of 1984.

And there we go. Stay liberal, Shreveport times.


Sorry to trouble you but might you be a bit more concrete as to the point you're wanting to make?


TheWhoppah: Why is it significant that he has always claimed to be innocent?  The jails are full of men that claim to be innocent.  So is hell.


If you had your way, the guy would've been dead 29 years ago. Gotta break some eggs to make an omelette, amirite?
 
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