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(Metro)   Can you top a baby costume made from a Caterpillar P-5000 Powered Work Loader that's ready to do battle with Xenomorphs? Didn't think so   (metro.co.uk) divider line 52
    More: Cool, aliens  
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5492 clicks; posted to Geek » on 11 Mar 2014 at 9:52 AM (20 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-11 09:35:59 AM
I've seen it before, but this is really well executed.
 
2014-03-11 09:54:06 AM
Holy shiat, is it 2005 again?
 
2014-03-11 10:11:59 AM
Can't wait until he falls over.
 
2014-03-11 10:23:25 AM

kroonermanblack: Holy shiat, is it 2005 again?


I thought it might be a copy of this thread from 2012, but apparently it's a different dad
 
2014-03-11 10:26:41 AM

bikerbob59: Can't wait until he falls over.


She'll be fine. There's a roll cage.
 
2014-03-11 10:30:16 AM
How is it a baby costume when it's an adult costume that the adult has the baby in a carrier?
 
2014-03-11 10:34:57 AM
Cool costume. Also, guy needs to learn when to stop filming.
 
2014-03-11 10:35:30 AM

TNel: How is it a baby costume when it's an adult costume that the adult has the baby in a carrier?


The baby is playing the role of Ripley. That is her costume.
 
2014-03-11 10:39:04 AM

lostcat: She'll be fine. There's a roll cage.


Of PVC.

yves0010: The baby is playing the role of Ripley. That is her costume.


Seems like a stretch.
 
2014-03-11 10:43:20 AM

TNel: yves0010: The baby is playing the role of Ripley. That is her costume.

Seems like a stretch.


But look where she is. She has to be playing the role of Ripley. She is piloting that thing after all.
 
2014-03-11 11:06:11 AM
Get away from her you biatch!
 
2014-03-11 11:06:29 AM
Why don't these machines exist for real already? Don't we have the tech yet to make this happen?
 
2014-03-11 11:07:39 AM

strangeluck: Why don't these machines exist for real already? Don't we have the tech yet to make this happen?


We just started to make exoskeletons. So I am sure someone in the exoskeloton field will make one for real.
 
2014-03-11 11:07:46 AM
God I hate attention whoring parents.  You have a child.  It gets the attention now, not you.
 
2014-03-11 11:14:06 AM

yves0010: strangeluck: Why don't these machines exist for real already? Don't we have the tech yet to make this happen?

We just started to make exoskeletons. So I am sure someone in the exoskeloton field will make one for real.


I sure hope so, been so much cool and genuinely potentially useful tech made in movies that seemed like the only big holdback to real life production was creating a portable power source strong enough get it going.
 
2014-03-11 11:17:39 AM

yves0010: strangeluck: Why don't these machines exist for real already? Don't we have the tech yet to make this happen?

We just started to make exoskeletons. So I am sure someone in the exoskeloton field will make one for real.


Because technology doesn't really permit it yet? We can achieve similar issues with hydraulics, but the mobile power source, plus a mobile hydraulic power unit (pump, basically) plus the hydraulics, plus the controls, plus the cooling for the hydraulic systems, and other factors, basically mean we don't have the ability to do it.

We could build something similar, but it would be stuck to one spot, or dragging 50 feet of hose behind it at all times.

Plus, honestly, the technology exists. it's a forklift. It's safe, simple, reliable, and they run without real interaction for 20-50 years. There's no incentive to make a hydraulic lifter exoskeleton. Plus you can mount/dismount a forklift in 1 second, probably not true for a lifter...
 
2014-03-11 11:22:00 AM

kroonermanblack: Plus, honestly, the technology exists. it's a forklift. It's safe, simple, reliable, and they run without real interaction for 20-50 years. There's no incentive to make a hydraulic lifter exoskeleton. Plus you can mount/dismount a forklift in 1 second, probably not true for a lifter...


Yeah i don't see the point of a lifter exoskeleton when a forklift does the same job.  If they can make the power supply for the exo suit small enough then it would be useful for tight areas but for now a forklift is perfect.
 
2014-03-11 11:26:37 AM

airsupport: Get away from her you biatch!


That should have been on the audio track, it would have been awesome!

SmackLT: kroonermanblack: Holy shiat, is it 2005 again?

I thought it might be a copy of this thread from 2012, but apparently it's a different dad


Yeah, i thought it was the repeat as well, at first. I think this one's better than last year's if I remember. I particularly liked the MC hammer dance number...

kroonermanblack: yves0010: strangeluck: Why don't these machines exist for real already? Don't we have the tech yet to make this happen?

We just started to make exoskeletons. So I am sure someone in the exoskeloton field will make one for real.

Because technology doesn't really permit it yet? We can achieve similar issues with hydraulics, but the mobile power source, plus a mobile hydraulic power unit (pump, basically) plus the hydraulics, plus the controls, plus the cooling for the hydraulic systems, and other factors, basically mean we don't have the ability to do it.

We could build something similar, but it would be stuck to one spot, or dragging 50 feet of hose behind it at all times.

Plus, honestly, the technology exists. it's a forklift. It's safe, simple, reliable, and they run without real interaction for 20-50 years. There's no incentive to make a hydraulic lifter exoskeleton. Plus you can mount/dismount a forklift in 1 second, probably not true for a lifter...


It DOES exist. Not a self contained PSU, still needs an umbilical, but totally wearable and currently lifts 200 lbs. Actually, that was "currently" back in '10 or so, so it could be even better by now...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mO0xNI3xpmE
 
2014-03-11 11:28:35 AM

TNel: kroonermanblack: Plus, honestly, the technology exists. it's a forklift. It's safe, simple, reliable, and they run without real interaction for 20-50 years. There's no incentive to make a hydraulic lifter exoskeleton. Plus you can mount/dismount a forklift in 1 second, probably not true for a lifter...

Yeah i don't see the point of a lifter exoskeleton when a forklift does the same job.  If they can make the power supply for the exo suit small enough then it would be useful for tight areas but for now a forklift is perfect.


One of the ideas is weapon loadouts on planes, where it takes multiple people and a dolly, since a forklift is too tall... Besides, forklifts take way more space than a man, and these exoskeleton suits are getting pretty streamlined, if they figure out the power supply, these things will be cool.
 
2014-03-11 11:47:41 AM

Mikey1969: TNel: kroonermanblack: Plus, honestly, the technology exists. it's a forklift. It's safe, simple, reliable, and they run without real interaction for 20-50 years. There's no incentive to make a hydraulic lifter exoskeleton. Plus you can mount/dismount a forklift in 1 second, probably not true for a lifter...

Yeah i don't see the point of a lifter exoskeleton when a forklift does the same job.  If they can make the power supply for the exo suit small enough then it would be useful for tight areas but for now a forklift is perfect.

One of the ideas is weapon loadouts on planes, where it takes multiple people and a dolly, since a forklift is too tall... Besides, forklifts take way more space than a man, and these exoskeleton suits are getting pretty streamlined, if they figure out the power supply, these things will be cool.


I was about to say something about a space issue. I was thinking a slim hallway where a fork lift can not maneuver so easily. Something like this has a better chance getting the job done. It is smaller and has a slight edge with maneuverability.
 
2014-03-11 11:48:53 AM
www.rookiemoms.com
 
2014-03-11 11:54:30 AM
yves0010:

I was about to say something about a space issue. I was thinking a slim hallway where a fork lift can not maneuver so easily. Something like this has a better chance getting the job done. It is smaller and has a slight edge with maneuverability.

I think even with the power umbilical, some of these jobs could be done already. I'm rather excited that they've come this far already.
 
2014-03-11 12:25:07 PM

Mikey1969: It DOES exist. Not a self contained PSU, still needs an umbilical, but totally wearable and currently lifts 200 lbs. Actually, that was "currently" back in '10 or so, so it could be even better by now...


Well, no. That's pretty much the lifter I was thinking about when I wrote this. We're still decades from a practical solution, especially when you know the actual limits of the technology, ergo my statement 'it does not exist'.

It's like carving a round rock out of stone and going 'ok, we've got F1 cars now, let's get to it guys'.  It's the ancestor to the technology which will allow something like this to function.
 
2014-03-11 12:39:11 PM

kroonermanblack: Mikey1969: It DOES exist. Not a self contained PSU, still needs an umbilical, but totally wearable and currently lifts 200 lbs. Actually, that was "currently" back in '10 or so, so it could be even better by now...

Well, no. That's pretty much the lifter I was thinking about when I wrote this. We're still decades from a practical solution, especially when you know the actual limits of the technology, ergo my statement 'it does not exist'.

It's like carving a round rock out of stone and going 'ok, we've got F1 cars now, let's get to it guys'.  It's the ancestor to the technology which will allow something like this to function.


What's the limit? A power umbilical and a 200 lb. workload? It would still work for loading up planes with ordnance. The thing is wearable, mobile and functional.

Of course, a 4 or 5 man crew is SO much more "practical".

s1.ibtimes.com
 
2014-03-11 01:15:21 PM

kroonermanblack: Holy shiat, is it 2005 again?


SOMEONE ELSE ALREADY DID THIS.  YOU MADE ME CLICK FOR NOTHING.  I'M BORED NOW.
 
2014-03-11 01:38:54 PM

Mikey1969: kroonermanblack: Mikey1969: It DOES exist. Not a self contained PSU, still needs an umbilical, but totally wearable and currently lifts 200 lbs. Actually, that was "currently" back in '10 or so, so it could be even better by now...

Well, no. That's pretty much the lifter I was thinking about when I wrote this. We're still decades from a practical solution, especially when you know the actual limits of the technology, ergo my statement 'it does not exist'.

It's like carving a round rock out of stone and going 'ok, we've got F1 cars now, let's get to it guys'.  It's the ancestor to the technology which will allow something like this to function.

What's the limit? A power umbilical and a 200 lb. workload? It would still work for loading up planes with ordnance. The thing is wearable, mobile and functional.

Of course, a 4 or 5 man crew is SO much more "practical".

[s1.ibtimes.com image 770x498]


farking Navy, over-complicating.

www.holloman.af.mil

/462
 
2014-03-11 02:11:38 PM
Or, more accurately, you whiny biatches could just admit you think it's pretty farking cool and wanted your dad to do something fun like that.
 
2014-03-11 02:32:38 PM

airsupport: Get away from her you biatch!


I watch the entire movie for that line.

Really.  :)
 
2014-03-11 02:48:55 PM

strangeluck: Why don't these machines exist for real already? Don't we have the tech yet to make this happen?


To quote someone from a thread yesterday. "power source, power source, power source". We could probably build a pretty badass mechsuit with today's technology, the problem is that you'd need one hell of an extension cord. With on board power possible today you'd be hard pressed to run it for more than a few minutes.
 
2014-03-11 03:02:23 PM

kroonermanblack: Plus, honestly, the technology exists. it's a forklift. It's safe, simple, reliable, and they run without real interaction for 20-50 years. There's no incentive to make a hydraulic lifter exoskeleton. Plus you can mount/dismount a forklift in 1 second, probably not true for a lifter...


Except for the fact that an exoskeleton could make movements that replicate the joints of a human: fingers, wrist, elbow, shoulder, waist/hips, knees, ankles.  LOTS of freedom of motion with those.  Not so with a forklift.
 
2014-03-11 03:03:38 PM
BTW, all I could think of while watching is, "What if the guys balls start to itch?"  Man, he'd have a hell of a time getting that suit off to scratch!!
 
2014-03-11 03:36:41 PM
< YouTube Comment >

It's FAKE!

If you look closely the machine doesn't respond right away to the baby's controls.

I think there's a man inside the back part of the machine.

< / YouTube Comment>
 
2014-03-11 03:42:56 PM

indy_kid: kroonermanblack: Plus, honestly, the technology exists. it's a forklift. It's safe, simple, reliable, and they run without real interaction for 20-50 years. There's no incentive to make a hydraulic lifter exoskeleton. Plus you can mount/dismount a forklift in 1 second, probably not true for a lifter...

Except for the fact that an exoskeleton could make movements that replicate the joints of a human: fingers, wrist, elbow, shoulder, waist/hips, knees, ankles.  LOTS of freedom of motion with those.  Not so with a forklift.


Fine you can have an exoskeleton to put things on pallets.
 
2014-03-11 03:49:11 PM

Satan's Bunny Slippers: airsupport: Get away from her you biatch!

I watch the entire movie for that line.

Really.  :)


ME TOO!

Still spine tingling after all these years.
 
2014-03-11 03:54:47 PM

netringer: < YouTube Comment >

It's FAKE!

If you look closely the machine doesn't respond right away to the baby's controls.

I think there's a man inside the back part of the machine.

< / YouTube Comment>


It wasn't until I saw the 3 hours behind the scenes of Aliens that I realised that's pretty much how the one in the movie worked too. I honestly thought it was a working unit suspended by cables (deleted in post). It was the 'Power Loader designed by Caterpillar' credit that threw me.

As for the practicality of something like this existing in real life, it would constantly need to shift its COG every time it reached out in front to move a heavy load. The activities depicted in the movie show a heavy missile being loaded onto the dropship and ripley lifting a (supposedly) heavy crate. I drive forklifts, and the whole 'counterbalance' concept is drummed into us in training. All the weight is at the rear of the vehicle to balance out the load being lifted, and that weight, in our case, is generally 3.5 tonnes, which signifies the amount that can be lifted before the truck starts to tip forward if overloaded. This is of course, regarding a vehicles with 4 or 3 wheels on the ground at all times, with the front wheels acting as the balancing point

Putting these factors into the concept of a bipedal power loader means that a counterbalancing weight would have to be at the rear of the vehicle equal to or greater than the average weight of the objects needed to be lifted, this means that the loader would at least need to 'lean forward' until a weight is lifted, at that point the tech inside the loader would arrange the weight distribution somehow, so that the machine can lift the load safely.

This all falls around our ears the second one of the loader's feet leaves the ground. The now central COG would have to dramatically shift to the opposite side to the lifted leg to stop the machine tipping over, and back again as each step is made. If you have 7 tonnes doing this regularly, in quick succession, there's no amount of hydraulics on a unit that compact that would be able to cope with that amount of momentum/interia/shifting mass without the whole thing coming crashing to the floor

The lifting tech already exists in Fork-Lift trucks, and is being improved and adapted constantly. We really don't need two-legged impractical loaders, unless, of course, you're making one of the best Sci-Fi movies of all time
 
2014-03-11 04:32:02 PM

Stantz: netringer: < YouTube Comment >

It's FAKE!

If you look closely the machine doesn't respond right away to the baby's controls.

I think there's a man inside the back part of the machine.

< / YouTube Comment>

It wasn't until I saw the 3 hours behind the scenes of Aliens that I realised that's pretty much how the one in the movie worked too. I honestly thought it was a working unit suspended by cables (deleted in post). It was the 'Power Loader designed by Caterpillar' credit that threw me.

As for the practicality of something like this existing in real life, it would constantly need to shift its COG every time it reached out in front to move a heavy load. The activities depicted in the movie show a heavy missile being loaded onto the dropship and ripley lifting a (supposedly) heavy crate. I drive forklifts, and the whole 'counterbalance' concept is drummed into us in training. All the weight is at the rear of the vehicle to balance out the load being lifted, and that weight, in our case, is generally 3.5 tonnes, which signifies the amount that can be lifted before the truck starts to tip forward if overloaded. This is of course, regarding a vehicles with 4 or 3 wheels on the ground at all times, with the front wheels acting as the balancing point

Putting these factors into the concept of a bipedal power loader means that a counterbalancing weight would have to be at the rear of the vehicle equal to or greater than the average weight of the objects needed to be lifted, this means that the loader would at least need to 'lean forward' until a weight is lifted, at that point the tech inside the loader would arrange the weight distribution somehow, so that the machine can lift the load safely.

This all falls around our ears the second one of the loader's feet leaves the ground. The now central COG would have to dramatically shift to the opposite side to the lifted leg to stop the machine tipping over, and back again as each step is made. If you have 7 ton ...


www.infinitegamepublishing.com
 
2014-03-11 04:38:04 PM

stuhayes2010: God I hate attention whoring parents.  You have a child.  It gets the attention now, not you.


Sounds like someone is jealous.
 
2014-03-11 04:43:45 PM

Mikey1969: kroonermanblack: Mikey1969: It DOES exist. Not a self contained PSU, still needs an umbilical, but totally wearable and currently lifts 200 lbs. Actually, that was "currently" back in '10 or so, so it could be even better by now...

Well, no. That's pretty much the lifter I was thinking about when I wrote this. We're still decades from a practical solution, especially when you know the actual limits of the technology, ergo my statement 'it does not exist'.

It's like carving a round rock out of stone and going 'ok, we've got F1 cars now, let's get to it guys'.  It's the ancestor to the technology which will allow something like this to function.

What's the limit? A power umbilical and a 200 lb. workload? It would still work for loading up planes with ordnance. The thing is wearable, mobile and functional.

Of course, a 4 or 5 man crew is SO much more "practical".

[s1.ibtimes.com image 770x498]


Human labor is cheap and easy to replace. In the given situation, it obviously IS more practical for a 4 or 5 man crew to do that job. What's your point?

Let's stick to your example right now. Let's say we run a hydraulic lifter, because electronics + sea water, even very well sealed, is bad. Hydraulics are easier, cheaper, and you can flush the lines with more fluid and be done. Ok. So then we have to worry about the massive amounts of heat generated by the lifter. Because hydraulic units work by compressing fluid. If the fluid gets too hot, it changes density, denatures, and will eventually blow out the pump.  Where does the cooling happen? On the device? Where is the storage tank? On the device? Do we play out a power AND hydraulic line?

Let's assume the unit is bipedal. It probably weights an extra 200-500 lbs over what a human does. What do you do when you need to load things in heavy surf? Does it have mag-boots? That's a lot of power. Does it move on tracks? We've just lost the benefit of a bipedal loader. What keeps it from slipping and falling on rough terrain, given the slippery nature of boat decks? How does it keep it's balance? How does it counterbalance heavy loads?

These are the things I mean when I say 'the technology doesn't exist yet'. Power consumption, heat dissipation, all of these are real problems engineers spend entire careers trying to design and redesign.

We have the computers and the technology to make/run these things, but we've had THAT since the 1800s. It's all about power and heat. And human safety of course.
 
2014-03-11 04:44:52 PM

StoPPeRmobile: Stantz: netringer: < YouTube Comment >

It's FAKE!

If you look closely the machine doesn't respond right away to the baby's controls.

I think there's a man inside the back part of the machine.

< / YouTube Comment>

It wasn't until I saw the 3 hours behind the scenes of Aliens that I realised that's pretty much how the one in the movie worked too. I honestly thought it was a working unit suspended by cables (deleted in post). It was the 'Power Loader designed by Caterpillar' credit that threw me.

As for the practicality of something like this existing in real life, it would constantly need to shift its COG every time it reached out in front to move a heavy load. The activities depicted in the movie show a heavy missile being loaded onto the dropship and ripley lifting a (supposedly) heavy crate. I drive forklifts, and the whole 'counterbalance' concept is drummed into us in training. All the weight is at the rear of the vehicle to balance out the load being lifted, and that weight, in our case, is generally 3.5 tonnes, which signifies the amount that can be lifted before the truck starts to tip forward if overloaded. This is of course, regarding a vehicles with 4 or 3 wheels on the ground at all times, with the front wheels acting as the balancing point

Putting these factors into the concept of a bipedal power loader means that a counterbalancing weight would have to be at the rear of the vehicle equal to or greater than the average weight of the objects needed to be lifted, this means that the loader would at least need to 'lean forward' until a weight is lifted, at that point the tech inside the loader would arrange the weight distribution somehow, so that the machine can lift the load safely.

This all falls around our ears the second one of the loader's feet leaves the ground. The now central COG would have to dramatically shift to the opposite side to the lifted leg to stop the machine tipping over, and back again as each step is made. If you ha ...


It would have to be ENORMOUS
 
2014-03-11 04:54:16 PM

kroonermanblack: Mikey1969: kroonermanblack: Mikey1969: It DOES exist. Not a self contained PSU, still needs an umbilical, but totally wearable and currently lifts 200 lbs. Actually, that was "currently" back in '10 or so, so it could be even better by now...

Well, no. That's pretty much the lifter I was thinking about when I wrote this. We're still decades from a practical solution, especially when you know the actual limits of the technology, ergo my statement 'it does not exist'.

It's like carving a round rock out of stone and going 'ok, we've got F1 cars now, let's get to it guys'.  It's the ancestor to the technology which will allow something like this to function.

What's the limit? A power umbilical and a 200 lb. workload? It would still work for loading up planes with ordnance. The thing is wearable, mobile and functional.

Of course, a 4 or 5 man crew is SO much more "practical".

[s1.ibtimes.com image 770x498]

Human labor is cheap and easy to replace. In the given situation, it obviously IS more practical for a 4 or 5 man crew to do that job. What's your point?

Let's stick to your example right now. Let's say we run a hydraulic lifter, because electronics + sea water, even very well sealed, is bad. Hydraulics are easier, cheaper, and you can flush the lines with more fluid and be done. Ok. So then we have to worry about the massive amounts of heat generated by the lifter. Because hydraulic units work by compressing fluid. If the fluid gets too hot, it changes density, denatures, and will eventually blow out the pump.  Where does the cooling happen? On the device? Where is the storage tank? On the device? Do we play out a power AND hydraulic line?

Let's assume the unit is bipedal. It probably weights an extra 200-500 lbs over what a human does. What do you do when you need to load things in heavy surf? Does it have mag-boots? That's a lot of power. Does it move on tracks? We've just lost the benefit of a bipedal loader. What keeps it from slipping and falling on rough ...


OK, here's the link again to the unit I'm talking about. Most of your questions should be answered by watching the video, or looking up the Ratheyon 'Iron Man Suit'.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mO0xNI3xpmE

And since we are Waterworld, you're right, everything is dependent on seawater.
 
2014-03-11 04:54:50 PM
Yet another reminder of how lame I was as a parent.
 
2014-03-11 05:43:51 PM

To The Escape Zeppelin!: strangeluck: Why don't these machines exist for real already? Don't we have the tech yet to make this happen?

To quote someone from a thread yesterday. "power source, power source, power source". We could probably build a pretty badass mechsuit with today's technology, the problem is that you'd need one hell of an extension cord. With on board power possible today you'd be hard pressed to run it for more than a few minutes.


that's where the Arc Reactor comes into play......
 
2014-03-11 06:02:17 PM

Mikey1969: OK, here's the link again to the unit I'm talking about. Most of your questions should be answered by watching the video, or looking up the Ratheyon 'Iron Man Suit'.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mO0xNI3xpmE


so SHIELD is funding it?
 
2014-03-11 06:14:57 PM

NYRBill: Mikey1969: OK, here's the link again to the unit I'm talking about. Most of your questions should be answered by watching the video, or looking up the Ratheyon 'Iron Man Suit'.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mO0xNI3xpmE

so SHIELD is funding it?


I had never seen this particular video before a few weeks ago. I remember when the story made the news since it was here in Salt Lake, but the Coulson thing adds a great geek touch to it. Wish I'd been there, it would have been cool.
 
2014-03-11 06:46:00 PM

airsupport: Satan's Bunny Slippers: airsupport: Get away from her you biatch!

I watch the entire movie for that line.

Really.  :)

ME TOO!

Still spine tingling after all these years.


ME THREE!
/Your Welcome

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=01NO-0lASUw
 
2014-03-11 09:00:46 PM

Mikey1969: OK, here's the link again to the unit I'm talking about. Most of your questions should be answered by watching the video, or looking up the Ratheyon 'Iron Man Suit'.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mO0xNI3xpmE

And since we are Waterworld, you're right, everything is dependent on seawater.


Sigh.

Whatever. I give in. You're clearly right about everything, and I totally apologize for not agreeing with you in the first place, that advertising video has me completely convinced that the product is without any limitations.
 
2014-03-11 09:07:33 PM

yves0010: Mikey1969: TNel: kroonermanblack: Plus, honestly, the technology exists. it's a forklift. It's safe, simple, reliable, and they run without real interaction for 20-50 years. There's no incentive to make a hydraulic lifter exoskeleton. Plus you can mount/dismount a forklift in 1 second, probably not true for a lifter...

Yeah i don't see the point of a lifter exoskeleton when a forklift does the same job.  If they can make the power supply for the exo suit small enough then it would be useful for tight areas but for now a forklift is perfect.

One of the ideas is weapon loadouts on planes, where it takes multiple people and a dolly, since a forklift is too tall... Besides, forklifts take way more space than a man, and these exoskeleton suits are getting pretty streamlined, if they figure out the power supply, these things will be cool.

I was about to say something about a space issue. I was thinking a slim hallway where a fork lift can not maneuver so easily. Something like this has a better chance getting the job done. It is smaller and has a slight edge with maneuverability.


www.yummymummyclub.ca
 
2014-03-11 09:17:40 PM

kroonermanblack: Mikey1969: OK, here's the link again to the unit I'm talking about. Most of your questions should be answered by watching the video, or looking up the Ratheyon 'Iron Man Suit'.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mO0xNI3xpmE

And since we are Waterworld, you're right, everything is dependent on seawater.

Sigh.

Whatever. I give in. You're clearly right about everything, and I totally apologize for not agreeing with you in the first place, that advertising video has me completely convinced that the product is without any limitations.


No, you're the one who insisted that it was nothing BUT limitations, and when you had exhausted all possible avenues, you decided that this could only possibly ever be used to work in the ocean on high seas and nothing else, so as a result, it could never work. I started by showing a working model that answered almost all of the questions you decided to ask 5 posts later.

Don't blame me.
 
2014-03-11 09:21:41 PM

To The Escape Zeppelin!: strangeluck: Why don't these machines exist for real already? Don't we have the tech yet to make this happen?

To quote someone from a thread yesterday. "power source, power source, power source". We could probably build a pretty badass mechsuit with today's technology, the problem is that you'd need one hell of an extension cord. With on board power possible today you'd be hard pressed to run it for more than a few minutes.


That solution for a powered exoskeleton worked for NERV. I mean if Japanese manga writers feel that independently powered exoskeletons might break reality in a story about a war between the angels of heaven and humanity, I would say including an umbilical cord on a real world powered exoskeleton is sufficient.

Hell that would have upped the tension in Ripley's scene even more.
 
2014-03-11 11:30:48 PM

stuhayes2010: God I hate attention whoring parents.  You have a child.  It gets the attention now, not you.


Normally I'd agree with you but in this case for some reason I couldn't help but think "wow, cool dad".  Dunno what it is this time over any of the others though.
 
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