Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Brand Republic)   "Before the internet existed, enforced downtime helped us think - now we have white noise"   (brandrepublic.com) divider line 39
    More: Sad, downtimes, digital revolution, Nokia phones, rubbish bin  
•       •       •

2146 clicks; posted to Geek » on 11 Mar 2014 at 11:00 AM (50 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



39 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-03-11 09:13:06 AM  
Thinking is so 1999. Now I have Instagram.
 
2014-03-11 10:41:33 AM  
Thinking is so 1999. Now I have Flappy Birds.
 
2014-03-11 10:50:14 AM  

plushpuppy: Thinking is so 1999. Now I have Flappy Birds.


shiat dude, sorry to hear about that.
 
2014-03-11 11:11:21 AM  
No, before the internet the people who waste time online were just wasting time in front of the TV. Back then people called it the idiot box. And we wore onions on our belts. It was the fashion at the time.

Before that they played checkers. Or solitaire. Or just sitting and watching the camp fire in the cave.

 Wasting time in mindless pursuits appears to be a basic human function. Take your alarmist claptrap somewhere else.
 
2014-03-11 11:12:28 AM  
That''s why I collect MeowMeowBeenz

www.thatsswell.ca
 
2014-03-11 11:20:12 AM  
Before the digital revolution, marketers were able to "tell" customers about their products and could relatively easily influence what they should think and/or feel about them. There were a limited number of mainly mass-market, non-interactive channels, where brands could talk at customers, but had little ability to be able to listen to what customers were saying in return.

Lady, I think that you're full of shiat. People wrote letters and called companies all the time back then to let them know if they thought the product was good or junk. What I'm taking away from this article, is she's complaining about having to adapt to the constantly growing and changing commercial world.
 
2014-03-11 11:21:08 AM  

SpectroBoy: No, before the internet the people who waste time online were just wasting time in front of the TV. Back then people called it the idiot box. And we wore onions on our belts. It was the fashion at the time.

Before that they played checkers. Or solitaire. Or just sitting and watching the camp fire in the cave.

 Wasting time in mindless pursuits appears to be a basic human function. Take your alarmist claptrap somewhere else.


Before TV, radio. Before radio, bars and live music venues and such. Human kind has a long and storied history of inventing ways to pass the time. It's literally part of our fundamental nature, from a historic viewpoint, the hunter-gatherer ancestors could only hunt and gather for so long each day. They had to do something in the down time, and we aren't like cats/dogs, we can't just sleep 18 hours a day.

It's a stupid point to say 'if this didn't exist we would all be philosophers, engineers, writers, chefs, and great people!  I don't do any of that shiat NOW because I don't want to. The chances are there, I just like playing video games in my underwear.

/took off to play titanfall
//probably wasn't worth it
///wasn't honestly THAT excited about the game to begin with
 
2014-03-11 11:21:28 AM  
This is a case where the headline should have included or at least mentioned the context of the quote.  Instead of referring to the social media aspects of the internet as being mindless, the article is complaining about the way always being connected and reachable means that work can't go away.

On that note,

Here's your #OWS update: work doesn't bleed over into home because capitalism is evil, work bleeds over to home because we have no idea what else to do at home, and thank God we can blame it on work.
 
2014-03-11 11:23:28 AM  
Barnes Wallis took an hour or so every day as think time. Just sat and thought about a particular problem.

I believe Einstein did the same thing.

Lots of people who accomplish amazing things seem able to schedule their time to make those things happen.

Oh and naps. Churchill was a famous napper. Alcohol and amazing meals probably helped him with that.
 
2014-03-11 11:26:01 AM  

SpectroBoy: No, before the internet the people who waste time online were just wasting time in front of the TV. Back then people called it the idiot box. And we wore onions on our belts. It was the fashion at the time.

Before that they played checkers. Or solitaire. Or just sitting and watching the camp fire in the cave.

 Wasting time in mindless pursuits appears to be a basic human function. Take your alarmist claptrap somewhere else.


The Internet has had some effect on political thought. Or rather, the rise of bloggers who used to have to at least print their screeds, and that took a bit of time even then. Now, you see a LOT of content that isn't just ill considered, but now united in purpose, because communications are fast. Not necessarily better, but you can see political memes spreading quickly.

Without the Internet, and the NEED to look DECISIVE I think that the GOP might have learned a bit from McCain's defeat. Taken the time to actually consider why they lost. Instead, they had to respond IMMEDIATELY and that congealed into the USURPER DESPOT DO NOTHING EMPTY SUIT meme that infects discourse. Folks tend to look to be first, as opposed to best. Or rather, they judge being first IS best, as opposed to thinking matters through. You can see that just with the coverage in the crisis in the Crimea.

There are folks who are thinking still. But they're not thinking on a larger scale, but how to unify the message across various platforms. It is a narrowing of thought, and yeah, in politics, that ain't great...
 
2014-03-11 11:27:36 AM  

SpectroBoy: That''s why I collect MeowMeowBeenz

[www.thatsswell.ca image 600x225]


UNINSTALL!
 
2014-03-11 11:39:13 AM  

hubiestubert: There are folks who are thinking still. But they're not thinking on a larger scale, but how to unify the message across various platforms. It is a narrowing of thought, and yeah, in politics, that ain't great...


I disagree.  They're still there, in the same numbers, but the democratization of mass communication that is the internet has drowned them out.
 
2014-03-11 11:43:15 AM  

strangeluck: Before the digital revolution, marketers were able to "tell" customers about their products and could relatively easily influence what they should think and/or feel about them. There were a limited number of mainly mass-market, non-interactive channels, where brands could talk at customers, but had little ability to be able to listen to what customers were saying in return.

Lady, I think that you're full of shiat. People wrote letters and called companies all the time back then to let them know if they thought the product was good or junk. What I'm taking away from this article, is she's complaining about having to adapt to the constantly growing and changing commercial world.


So, essentially, she sucks at her job and probably needs to get a new one.
 
2014-03-11 11:47:11 AM  

hubiestubert: SpectroBoy: No, before the internet the people who waste time online were just wasting time in front of the TV. Back then people called it the idiot box. And we wore onions on our belts. It was the fashion at the time.

Before that they played checkers. Or solitaire. Or just sitting and watching the camp fire in the cave.

 Wasting time in mindless pursuits appears to be a basic human function. Take your alarmist claptrap somewhere else.

The Internet has had some effect on political thought. Or rather, the rise of bloggers who used to have to at least print their screeds, and that took a bit of time even then. Now, you see a LOT of content that isn't just ill considered, but now united in purpose, because communications are fast. Not necessarily better, but you can see political memes spreading quickly.

Without the Internet, and the NEED to look DECISIVE I think that the GOP might have learned a bit from McCain's defeat. Taken the time to actually consider why they lost. Instead, they had to respond IMMEDIATELY and that congealed into the USURPER DESPOT DO NOTHING EMPTY SUIT meme that infects discourse. Folks tend to look to be first, as opposed to best. Or rather, they judge being first IS best, as opposed to thinking matters through. You can see that just with the coverage in the crisis in the Crimea.

There are folks who are thinking still. But they're not thinking on a larger scale, but how to unify the message across various platforms. It is a narrowing of thought, and yeah, in politics, that ain't great...


It depends on what you mean by "learn from McCain."  Would they try to pull all of the debt ceiling and budgeting stunts that they did in the last few years?  Probably not, but those succeeded from their base's perspective.  Would they still have run Romney in 2012?  Probably since he was the favorite of the "thinking" wing of the Republican party while the angry bloggers jumped from one flash in the pan to another before settling on Santorum.  Would members of the Republican party still make empty criticisms about a lack of leadership in Crimea and an empty suit president?  Yes, because one of the roles of the opposition party is to make vague, unsubstantiated criticisms about the party in power.  Would cranks still sneak into office?  Joseph McCarthy was a two term senator.  All of the things you mentioned have always been a constant presence in politics.

As for first vs best, that is a phenomenon older than the internet.  Just look at all the crap 60 Minutes has pulled over its career.  Journalism irresponsibility is an old thing and even the best outlets can be guilty of it (see the early 2000's NY Times as an example of this).  The world didn't get darker, your eyes have just gotten worse.
 
2014-03-11 11:49:46 AM  
"revolutioned"?

Cheez.
 
2014-03-11 11:50:33 AM  

gnosis301: hubiestubert: There are folks who are thinking still. But they're not thinking on a larger scale, but how to unify the message across various platforms. It is a narrowing of thought, and yeah, in politics, that ain't great...

I disagree.  They're still there, in the same numbers, but the democratization of mass communication that is the internet has drowned them out.


On the other hand, no one listened to them back when there were only three stations and your local paper.  The problem is not technology, the problem is you and me.
 
2014-03-11 12:12:47 PM  

llortcM_yllort: The problem is not technology, the problem is you and me.


The same people who killed Kennedy.
 
2014-03-11 12:14:04 PM  
You know, I hear a lot of talk.

And so I'm headed for the stereo store.

To get a white noise maker, and turn it up to "10".
 
2014-03-11 12:15:22 PM  
The fark kind of rambling buzzword laden bullshiat did I just read?

This isn't about thinking, or white noise, or enforced downtime.

It's some old lady being asked to talk about how great her career in marketing has been.
 
2014-03-11 12:22:48 PM  
13 Things Your Boobs Would Say If They Could Talk (Featured Partner)


WE NEED MORE OF THIS KIND OF INTELLIGENT THINGAMAJIG!
 
2014-03-11 12:26:43 PM  
Hey geeks, anybody know the story on SoylentNews.org , the result of the Slashdot "fark beta" boycott?

One of its founders (John Barrabas) pulled a serious diva dick move routine, demanded $2,000, and then without even waiting his own week's deadline, sold the domain and DNS out from under the actual site maintainers.  Right now it's completely offline, perhaps because the new buyer wasn't quite as benevolent as expected.  The guy seems to have been a serious asshole and just about destroyed this baby tech news site.

Even its VM host address isn't delivering any more.
http://li694-22.members.linode.com/

Anybody have any more information?
 
2014-03-11 12:34:56 PM  

Far Cough: Hey geeks, anybody know the story on SoylentNews.org , the result of the Slashdot "fark beta" boycott?

One of its founders (John Barrabas) pulled a serious diva dick move routine, demanded $2,000, and then without even waiting his own week's deadline, sold the domain and DNS out from under the actual site maintainers.  Right now it's completely offline, perhaps because the new buyer wasn't quite as benevolent as expected.  The guy seems to have been a serious asshole and just about destroyed this baby tech news site.

Even its VM host address isn't delivering any more.
http://li694-22.members.linode.com/

Anybody have any more information?



Oh no! Slashdot is down! Where will the failed engineers go now?
 
2014-03-11 12:44:54 PM  

strangeluck: Before the digital revolution, marketers were able to "tell" customers about their products and could relatively easily influence what they should think and/or feel about them. There were a limited number of mainly mass-market, non-interactive channels, where brands could talk at customers, but had little ability to be able to listen to what customers were saying in return.

Lady, I think that you're full of shiat. People wrote letters and called companies all the time back then to let them know if they thought the product was good or junk. What I'm taking away from this article, is she's complaining about having to adapt to the constantly growing and changing commercial world.


It was a nice way of saying that it's now harder to keep a coverup operation going, both from the PR side and the middle management side. If a product is a bomb then everyone including customers and investors are going to know instantly.

Of course if this is a problem for her, she can still squeeze by for a few more years in china. I hear it's still the year of the snake oil there.
 
2014-03-11 12:48:39 PM  

Sugarbombs: strangeluck: Before the digital revolution, marketers were able to "tell" customers about their products and could relatively easily influence what they should think and/or feel about them. There were a limited number of mainly mass-market, non-interactive channels, where brands could talk at customers, but had little ability to be able to listen to what customers were saying in return.

Lady, I think that you're full of shiat. People wrote letters and called companies all the time back then to let them know if they thought the product was good or junk. What I'm taking away from this article, is she's complaining about having to adapt to the constantly growing and changing commercial world.

It was a nice way of saying that it's now harder to keep a coverup operation going, both from the PR side and the middle management side. If a product is a bomb then everyone including customers and investors are going to know instantly.

Of course if this is a problem for her, she can still squeeze by for a few more years in china. I hear it's still the year of the snake oil there.


if you're in any kind of problem-solving/creative field, yeah down time is extremely important

if you're in a consumer mindset, then as much information as possible is a good thing
 
2014-03-11 01:47:38 PM  
Thinking is white noise.
 
2014-03-11 02:10:43 PM  
At some point there was some crabby columnist complaining about all the time spent in idle pursuits such as barn dances, when Bible-reading was really more self-improving.  Surely if you don't wise up you will end up as a hobo or stevedore.
 
2014-03-11 02:11:45 PM  
www.dkimages.com

I was thinking the exact same thing last night.
 
2014-03-11 02:40:18 PM  
Blizzard is doing their part by inexplicably still taking their servers down weeks for maintenance. How that can still be necessary in 2014 is a technological mystery.
 
2014-03-11 02:47:30 PM  

cretinbob: [www.dkimages.com image 424x348]

I was thinking the exact same thing last night.


Those are funny looking beans.
 
2014-03-11 02:50:31 PM  

strangeluck: Before the digital revolution, marketers were able to "tell" customers about their products and could relatively easily influence what they should think and/or feel about them. There were a limited number of mainly mass-market, non-interactive channels, where brands could talk at customers, but had little ability to be able to listen to what customers were saying in return.


The headline suggested an article about how we've lost something essential and human through the invention of medium that makes it possible to drown out our own thoughts effectively at all times.  Instead it's an article about how much harder it is for advertisers to piss all over our collective consciousness.  Gross.
 
2014-03-11 03:53:52 PM  

TheShavingofOccam123: Barnes Wallis took an hour or so every day as think time. Just sat and thought about a particular problem.

I believe Einstein did the same thing.

Lots of people who accomplish amazing things seem able to schedule their time to make those things happen.

Oh and naps. Churchill was a famous napper. Alcohol and amazing meals probably helped him with that.


I thought he was a brit.
 
2014-03-11 04:18:37 PM  

SpectroBoy: No, before the internet the people who waste time online were just wasting time in front of the TV. Back then people called it the idiot box. And we wore onions on our belts. It was the fashion at the time.

Before that they played checkers. Or solitaire. Or just sitting and watching the camp fire in the cave.

 Wasting time in mindless pursuits appears to be a basic human function. Take your alarmist claptrap somewhere else.


Reckon Internet is different. I learn something every day on Fark. Even on Imgur I get a prompt to think of something new.

Whereas in TV age the only education I got was watching America's Funniest Home Videos
 
2014-03-11 05:18:52 PM  

llortcM_yllort: This is a case where the headline should have included or at least mentioned the context of the quote.  Instead of referring to the social media aspects of the internet as being mindless, the article is complaining about the way always being connected and reachable means that work can't go away.

On that note,

Here's your #OWS update: work doesn't bleed over into home because capitalism is evil, work bleeds over to home because we have no idea what else to do at home, and thank God we can blame it on work.


The technology gives the means, but it is our society's fault that people work all the time.  Before cell phones and computers, people just stuck around in the office for hours or came in on weekends...and they still do.  Some people believe the more they work, the faster they will go up the ladder...and other people see those people and think they have to work to 'keep up'.  And businesses tap into that mentality, making it difficult for people to truly disconnect from work.

My husband is a nuclear engineer and works 9 hours a day and gets every other Friday off.  He's the only one in his group who comes in on time (instead of early) and leaves on time (instead of late)...nor does he go in on his Fridays or weekends off.  But this hasn't affected his upward mobility at all, and he always gets top marks on his reviews.  After talking to the wives of the rest of the engineers in the group, I realized that I'm quite lucky that my husband doesn't work over all the time.  He's the only one in his group that can truly leave his work at work and enjoy family life at home.
 
2014-03-11 05:57:47 PM  

bborchar: llortcM_yllort: This is a case where the headline should have included or at least mentioned the context of the quote.  Instead of referring to the social media aspects of the internet as being mindless, the article is complaining about the way always being connected and reachable means that work can't go away.

On that note,

Here's your #OWS update: work doesn't bleed over into home because capitalism is evil, work bleeds over to home because we have no idea what else to do at home, and thank God we can blame it on work.

The technology gives the means, but it is our society's fault that people work all the time.  Before cell phones and computers, people just stuck around in the office for hours or came in on weekends...and they still do.  Some people believe the more they work, the faster they will go up the ladder...and other people see those people and think they have to work to 'keep up'.  And businesses tap into that mentality, making it difficult for people to truly disconnect from work.

My husband is a nuclear engineer and works 9 hours a day and gets every other Friday off.  He's the only one in his group who comes in on time (instead of early) and leaves on time (instead of late)...nor does he go in on his Fridays or weekends off.  But this hasn't affected his upward mobility at all, and he always gets top marks on his reviews.  After talking to the wives of the rest of the engineers in the group, I realized that I'm quite lucky that my husband doesn't work over all the time.  He's the only one in his group that can truly leave his work at work and enjoy family life at home.


A smart person works to support a family and other persuits. A fool works their lives away while letting their loved ones go without.
 
2014-03-11 06:05:11 PM  

llortcM_yllort: gnosis301: hubiestubert: There are folks who are thinking still. But they're not thinking on a larger scale, but how to unify the message across various platforms. It is a narrowing of thought, and yeah, in politics, that ain't great...

I disagree.  They're still there, in the same numbers, but the democratization of mass communication that is the internet has drowned them out.

On the other hand, no one listened to them back when there were only three stations and your local paper.  The problem is not technology, the problem is you and me.


Maybe you, but not me.
 
2014-03-11 06:20:41 PM  

bborchar: llortcM_yllort: This is a case where the headline should have included or at least mentioned the context of the quote.  Instead of referring to the social media aspects of the internet as being mindless, the article is complaining about the way always being connected and reachable means that work can't go away.

On that note,

Here's your #OWS update: work doesn't bleed over into home because capitalism is evil, work bleeds over to home because we have no idea what else to do at home, and thank God we can blame it on work.

The technology gives the means, but it is our society's fault that people work all the time.  Before cell phones and computers, people just stuck around in the office for hours or came in on weekends...and they still do.  Some people believe the more they work, the faster they will go up the ladder...and other people see those people and think they have to work to 'keep up'.  And businesses tap into that mentality, making it difficult for people to truly disconnect from work.

My husband is a nuclear engineer and works 9 hours a day and gets every other Friday off.  He's the only one in his group who comes in on time (instead of early) and leaves on time (instead of late)...nor does he go in on his Fridays or weekends off.  But this hasn't affected his upward mobility at all, and he always gets top marks on his reviews.  After talking to the wives of the rest of the engineers in the group, I realized that I'm quite lucky that my husband doesn't work over all the time.  He's the only one in his group that can truly leave his work at work and enjoy family life at home.


Pretty much this.  "Work smarter not harder" and all that.  I managed a multimedia company during the dot com boom... when people were proud of working insane hours.  Not once did I award someone with a raise, compliment, promotion for working longer and harder.  Hell, more often than not I was impressed when someone could figure out a solution in a few hours and take the afternoon off... compared to those who needed a 12+ hour day to do likewise.
 
2014-03-11 07:21:01 PM  

SpectroBoy: No, before the internet the people who waste time online were just wasting time in front of the TV. Back then people called it the idiot box. And we wore onions on our belts. It was the fashion at the time.

Before that they played checkers. Or solitaire. Or just sitting and watching the camp fire in the cave.

 Wasting time in mindless pursuits appears to be a basic human function. Take your alarmist claptrap somewhere else.


They're going to love the Internet of Things.
 
2014-03-11 08:41:49 PM  

llortcM_yllort: The world didn't get darker, your eyes have just gotten worse.


Is that yours? No matter, I'm totally stealing that.
 
2014-03-12 03:46:29 AM  

TheShavingofOccam123: Barnes Wallis took an hour or so every day as think time. Just sat and thought about a particular problem.


I do too.

Of course, usually the problem I think about is something along the lines of "Is that hot teen lesbian going to succumb to her MILF friend's erotic overtures?"

Thank you, internet.
 
Displayed 39 of 39 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report