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(Kansas City)   Missouri joins the race to get all those high taxes from marijuana legalization   (kansascity.com) divider line 37
    More: Obvious, Missouri, marijuana legalization, high taxes, excise taxes, JEFFERSON CITY  
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3804 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Mar 2014 at 9:34 AM (31 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-11 09:36:03 AM  
Rep. Kenneth Wilson, a retired police officer, said he was concerned about the effect of secondhand smoke if marijuana was used in homes around children.

"What I fear is that if we do decriminalize this we are going to make it attractive," said Rep. Galen Higdon, R-St. Joseph, a former sheriff's deputy. "I do not want to bring anything else that is going to create a negative impact on our young children."


Who gives a fark about the children?
 
2014-03-11 09:36:09 AM  
Good luck getting that past the Bible thumpers
 
2014-03-11 09:36:21 AM  
Show-Me-State indeed

www.pitch.com
 
2014-03-11 09:37:58 AM  

scottydoesntknow: Rep. Kenneth Wilson, a retired police officer, said he was concerned about the effect of secondhand smoke if marijuana was used in homes around children.

"What I fear is that if we do decriminalize this we are going to make it attractive," said Rep. Galen Higdon, R-St. Joseph, a former sheriff's deputy. "I do not want to bring anything else that is going to create a negative impact on our young children."

Who gives a fark about the children?


I'm more concerned about the effects of second hand stupidity on children. The kind spread by members of that particular political party.
 
2014-03-11 09:39:43 AM  

scottydoesntknow: Rep. Kenneth Wilson, a retired police officer, said he was concerned about the effect of secondhand smoke if marijuana was used in homes around children.

"What I fear is that if we do decriminalize this we are going to make it attractive," said Rep. Galen Higdon, R-St. Joseph, a former sheriff's deputy. "I do not want to bring anything else that is going to create a negative impact on our young children."

Who gives a fark about the children?


Because nothing illegal is attractive to kids.
 
2014-03-11 09:40:46 AM  
Since this is Misery it is also the savings from not having to arrest, incarcerate, feed, and (later) re-incarcerate  poor brown people and make them Felons4LifeTM
 
2014-03-11 09:41:08 AM  
It won't pass. The desire for new revenue will lose to prison industry lobbyists. If weed were legal, the prison population would crater - then how would would all those private prisons get their hands on that sweet tax payer money?
 
2014-03-11 09:45:19 AM  
I'm all for it, the more states that make this a reality the quicker the federal government will have to come around. This coming from a conservative who is also a federal law enforcement officer, imagine that.
 
2014-03-11 09:51:23 AM  
I'd be shocked if it happened in Missouri. Their cops are pretty nazi and it would be surprising if they let this through.
 
2014-03-11 09:53:30 AM  

Private_Citizen: It won't pass. The desire for new revenue will lose to prison industry lobbyists. If weed were legal, the prison population would crater - then how would would all those private prisons get their hands on that sweet tax payer money?


The prison population would remain the same, although it might go down by attrition.  Legalization doesn't mean people already in prison automatically get released.  They broke the law at the time and that doesn't change.

Sadly.
 
2014-03-11 09:58:46 AM  

scottydoesntknow: Rep. Kenneth Wilson, a retired police officer, said he was concerned about the effect of secondhand smoke if marijuana was used in homes around children.

"What I fear is that if we do decriminalize this we are going to make it attractive," said Rep. Galen Higdon, R-St. Joseph, a former sheriff's deputy. "I do not want to bring anything else that is going to create a negative impact on our young children."

Who gives a fark about the children?


I love all these ancillary arguments people throw out when discussing legalization. The handwringing over things that 1) are already happening and 2) are separate issues, but when you try to discuss the (far more destructive) side effects of the drug war it's crickets from their side.  Apparently the only way to avoid "sending the wrong message to kids" is to launch a 40-year quasi-military campaign against your own citizens.

Private_Citizen: It won't pass. The desire for new revenue will lose to prison industry lobbyists. If weed were legal, the prison population would crater - then how would would all those private prisons get their hands on that sweet tax payer money?


Oh, good; another one on the "private prison" bogeyman that is the current scapegoat among those who want to appear to "know the real story" when in reality they know jack shiat. As if everything was wonderful and people were so open-minded about these things before the evil private prison industry came along and farked everything up. Of course it has nothing to do with the bible-thumping/law-and-order crowd out there, the push from overzealous prosecutors and legislatures for three-strikes and other draconian sentencing laws. It's all just a smokescreen, the private prison industry is really behind the whole thing.

I'm not a fan of private prisons either, but there is a big difference between an industry capitalizing on an already-occurring phenomenon and being the cause of it. Do you really think we'd have fewer people in prison if they were all state-run? The dramatic rise in the prison population came first; private prisons were a response in an effort to keep up with the overcrowding. At some point you get a symbiotic relationship, but the Fark narrative on the subject is pretty ridiculous.
 
2014-03-11 10:03:09 AM  

FumblingTowardsSanity: Private_Citizen: It won't pass. The desire for new revenue will lose to prison industry lobbyists. If weed were legal, the prison population would crater - then how would would all those private prisons get their hands on that sweet tax payer money?

The prison population would remain the same, although it might go down by attrition.  Legalization doesn't mean people already in prison automatically get released.  They broke the law at the time and that doesn't change.

Sadly.


I'll bet the stock for Prison corps would tank on the news. You're right, the population won't change overnight, but the future projections would be around 30-50% lower (the amount of people in prison for drug or drug related charges). Some prisons would have to close/be consolidated.

So, the prison industry will fight it with the best lobbyists and astroturf groups money can buy.
 
2014-03-11 10:08:10 AM  

Hobodeluxe: Good luck getting that past the Bible thumpers


And lo, God said unto his followers: smokest thou not the bud of the cannabis plant, or thoust shall surely be smote down with the fornicators and those who talk in the theater.  So sayeth The Lord.
 
2014-03-11 10:08:14 AM  
Hey Harvey, you know it's ok when people discuss things you don't agree with.... right? The prison industry doors fund pushback against legalization efforts. They didn't start it, but they sure want it to continue.
 
2014-03-11 10:08:26 AM  

FumblingTowardsSanity: Private_Citizen: It won't pass. The desire for new revenue will lose to prison industry lobbyists. If weed were legal, the prison population would crater - then how would would all those private prisons get their hands on that sweet tax payer money?

The prison population would remain the same, although it might go down by attrition.  Legalization doesn't mean people already in prison automatically get released.  They broke the law at the time and that doesn't change.

Sadly.


Not true. Check-up on what happened in Colorado.
 
2014-03-11 10:11:16 AM  
I'd say less than 10 years now, possibly even by 2020.
 
2014-03-11 10:12:08 AM  
Rep. Kenneth Wilson, a retired police officer, said he was concerned about the effect of secondhand smoke if marijuana was used in homes around children

Great, so I'm sure you're also pushing for the complete ban of all tobacco products in the state by that same logic, correct? You know, a substance with second hand smoke that has actually been PROVEN to have adverse health affects to both children and adults.
 
2014-03-11 10:21:38 AM  
We will have flying cars before legal weed in Missouri.
 
2014-03-11 10:39:18 AM  

Mid_mo_mad_man: We will have flying cars before legal weed in Missouri.


I don't know, didn't it come pretty close to passing in Springfield a year or two ago?  I don't know that it would be that hard to get StL and KC on board, then you have Columbia and Springfield next.  Columbia seems like it would be a somewhat easy pass, and Springfield has already tried it once.  Get those 4 cities on board and it doesn't matter what the rest of the state thinks.
 
2014-03-11 10:41:26 AM  
The bill's sponsor said he was against legalizing marijuana use until he changed his mind after serving on the bench.
"I saw too many young people whose lives were ruined by the government for using small amounts of marijuana," said Rep. Chris Kelly, D-Columbia, and a former Boone County judge.


 
ftfy
 
2014-03-11 10:50:13 AM  
I hope it happens. I don't like having to make the 20-hour round trip to Denver from STL once a month.
 
2014-03-11 11:03:01 AM  
I live in Kansas City, in a area where a TON of cops live.  Most cops I know think we should legalize it.  Well most I have asked will let someone go if it is just a joint or a small amount, unless they want to use it for leverage on something else.  I am sure the courts dont want to deal with small cases and most are pled out anyway.    Seems taxing would free up the cops and get the state the money it wants.

I think the hard core Republicans in the statehouse will be swayed as they are on kick to cut taxes.   If they legalize and set a sin tax on it (all ways a free pass on taxes for conservatives)  they can be cash positive with cutting income taxes.  I know it would be short term (like legalized casino gaming like few years ago).  When other neighboring states legalized and the novitly wears off, tax revenue will drop.
 
2014-03-11 11:12:06 AM  
There is something in drug legalization for everyone, almost, as I see it:  If you are a mercantilist, you believe that in a demand-driven economy proscription could never work, practically equivalent to subsidizing criminals.  If you are a liberal you must be repelled by the grossly disproportionate enforcement among minorities and social classes.  If you are a libertarian. . .
 
2014-03-11 11:20:49 AM  

Private_Citizen: Hey Harvey, you know it's ok when people discuss things you don't agree with.... right? The prison industry doors fund pushback against legalization efforts. They didn't start it, but they sure want it to continue.


And I'm sure you exercise a lot of patience and understanding with 9/11, Benghazi and birth certificate truthers.
 
2014-03-11 11:28:10 AM  
I wouldn't have thought it possible, but lately I think it might pass in Missouri.  If only so that more pot smokers would rat on meth dealers.
 
2014-03-11 11:38:47 AM  
It would seem to me that a state with a decent agriculture industry, and a strong states right's rights frame of mind, would be for this.

I would figure the regular cops, LEOs, and such would back legalization too. The dangerous elements of MJ are in the business of dealing it in an illegal structure. Money is involved, and people will do dangerous things to protect, acquire and otherwise claim money...   be it a government or individual. As for what elements might be in the MJ other than cannibanoids and thc, the dangerous additions are the kind of thing that happen on the black market to raise value...   in a legal market that elements can be controlled and eradicated, and the other element like second hand smoke can be mitigated by the use of edibles and vapes, and with the new E-cig generation, I can see a generation of new THC vapes of a similar nature finding the market at some point. A very multifaceted market, with a lot of potential revenue compounded with revenue from new markets built on the basis of legal MJ access. So basically...  no second hand smoke danger to be concerned about.

That and power influenced by it.
Rarely is power given away, rarely is money given away by industry...  unless it is given away to protect assets and market.

The same kind of old mind conservative thought process, gripping with white knuckled determination to hold on to old ideas and dogma in the face of evolving factual contradiction. Still...   rednecks like weed and meth, hopefully we can get more of them interested in MJ and calm down the meth use...    maybe. But at least the prison industry will have that stuff to go after.
 
2014-03-11 11:48:01 AM  
even if all other 49 states legalize even medical marijuana, this state of Missouri never will

/ I need to move
 
2014-03-11 12:08:01 PM  

Harvey Manfrenjensenjen: Private_Citizen: Hey Harvey, you know it's ok when people discuss things you don't agree with.... right? The prison industry doors fund pushback against legalization efforts. They didn't start it, but they sure want it to continue.

And I'm sure you exercise a lot of patience and understanding with 9/11, Benghazi and birth certificate truthers.


In the beginning, I did exercise patience with them. But once the evidence was in, and they still refused to see truth, I just choose to leave them alone. Faith is a private matter.

As for the prison industry funding push back against legalization, that's a matter of public record. I know the prison industry didn't start the US trend of incarcerating huge numbers for minor offences, but now they do profit from it. And they are fighting to preserve their business model.

Which brings me back to my original point: the prison industry fights hard and they are well funded. My money is on them successfully killing the legalization bill.

/I would love to be wrong about that.
 
2014-03-11 12:53:53 PM  

Private_Citizen: FumblingTowardsSanity: Private_Citizen: It won't pass. The desire for new revenue will lose to prison industry lobbyists. If weed were legal, the prison population would crater - then how would would all those private prisons get their hands on that sweet tax payer money?

The prison population would remain the same, although it might go down by attrition.  Legalization doesn't mean people already in prison automatically get released.  They broke the law at the time and that doesn't change.

Sadly.

I'll bet the stock for Prison corps would tank on the news. You're right, the population won't change overnight, but the future projections would be around 30-50% lower (the amount of people in prison for drug or drug related charges). Some prisons would have to close/be consolidated.

So, the prison industry will fight it with the best lobbyists and astroturf groups money can buy.


Missouri doesn't have any private prisons at all; all of the prisons in the state are run by the Missouri Department of Corrections. Some of the services provided in those prisons (such as health care) are provided by private contractors, but all corrections officers, superintendents, wardens, etc. are state employees.

The legalization bill was sponsored by a Boone County Democrat and former judge. He's actually been a long-serving representative despite Missouri's term limit laws; he initially served in the House from 1982-94, then took a hiatus until his recent tenure started in 2008. On his first time through, he passed Missouri's DWI and Abuse and Lose laws. In his most recent tenure, he's reformed crack sentencing and reformed probation and parole laws. So, it seems like he's mellowed on the law & order side since his time on the bench and this seems to be a continuation of that. He also covers the most liberal part of Missouri that isn't St. Louis or Kansas City - his district includes Mizzou and the two liberal arts colleges located in Columbia. I'm pretty sure he's already announced that he's not going to seek reelection, too, so this might just be him going out with a bang since he doesn't have to worry about another election this fall.
 
2014-03-11 12:54:38 PM  

scottydoesntknow: Rep. Kenneth Wilson, a retired police officer, said he was concerned about the effect of secondhand smoke if marijuana was used in homes around children.

"What I fear is that if we do decriminalize this we are going to make it attractive," said Rep. Galen Higdon, R-St. Joseph, a former sheriff's deputy. "I do not want to bring anything else that is going to create a negative impact on our young children."

Who gives a fark about the children?


How about gangs? Do gangs still have an impact on children? Decriminalization will improve that.
 
2014-03-11 12:57:13 PM  

FumblingTowardsSanity: Private_Citizen: It won't pass. The desire for new revenue will lose to prison industry lobbyists. If weed were legal, the prison population would crater - then how would would all those private prisons get their hands on that sweet tax payer money?

The prison population would remain the same, although it might go down by attrition.  Legalization doesn't mean people already in prison automatically get released.  They broke the law at the time and that doesn't change.

Sadly.


People get out of prison every day. If less people are getting put in prison, then the prison population will decline.

COME ON!
 
2014-03-11 01:01:55 PM  
Once CO announced their revenue from cannabis, I pretty well figured all the states would be like "Remember how we always said that marijuana is so terrible and would completely destroy the universe?  Yeah, about that...".
 
2014-03-11 01:17:46 PM  

gu1tarjohn: Once CO announced their revenue from cannabis, I pretty well figured all the states would be like "Remember how we always said that marijuana is so terrible and would completely destroy the universe?  Yeah, about that...".


There have to be some smart conservatives in government, and their out is right on the surface without having to admit being wrong.

"We still contend that injecting marijuanas is highly dangerous, but decriminalization will reduce the stigma associated with getting help with chronic, persistent, debilitating, physical marijuana addictions"
 
2014-03-11 01:36:00 PM  

SNGX1275: Mid_mo_mad_man: We will have flying cars before legal weed in Missouri.

I don't know, didn't it come pretty close to passing in Springfield a year or two ago?  I don't know that it would be that hard to get StL and KC on board, then you have Columbia and Springfield next.  Columbia seems like it would be a somewhat easy pass, and Springfield has already tried it once.  Get those 4 cities on board and it doesn't matter what the rest of the state thinks.


I agree. Yay, were next! M-Liquid
 
2014-03-11 02:20:37 PM  
Colorado just announced they made 2.1 million from the tax revenue from 24 stores that had recreational pot for sale in the month of January.  The state also brought in another 1.3 million in permits and licensing fees.  In 2013, all the stores and breweries in the state brought in 2 million for the month of January.

There are now 160+ store around Colorado that are licensed.

Do the math.
 
2014-03-11 02:23:32 PM  
^Stores and breweries selling alcohol.

/sick in bed today.
 
2014-03-11 02:56:23 PM  
There is a lot of good stuff in this article and the entire action of legalization, but one really sad note. It is all driven by $...

The bill's sponsor said he was against legalizing marijuana use until he changed his mind after serving on the bench.
Kelly added that he did not condone marijuana use or advocate for it... legalization could save money and stop ineffective government regulation.

How pleasant to see that someone can read just their stance on something from observing the futility of the current laws/actions.

The only ones who are going to fight this is are the Conservatives, Religious and top LEO. Conservatives because, Religious because God, and top LEOs because they can't/won't admit that what they have been doing in this case is stupid and wrong. Most street cops seem to think it should be legalized...

The money would be divided between pensions for law enforcement officers, education, mental health, substance abuse programs and local governments.
Too bad we have to bribe the top LEOs to go along with it. I agree with all the rest of the funding, but why pensions for LEOs? They already have plenty, and why do they get a cut of making their job easier and more realistic?

Just a few thoughts from a non-smoker:
The whole country needs to realize the war on drugs, marajuana at least, has been an abject failure and tax payer drain. I've never seen a scarcity if it. Go after the meth, blow and heroin those are the real problems!
We need more states to boost their tax revenue with legal weed to the point that the Feds repeal the laws making it illegal, paving the way for industrial hemp farms. Hemp is a marvelous plant that would help us out in a lot of ways!

/Damn, now I sound like a smelly hippie
//Hates smelly hippies
///Hates smelly hipsters too, but that is another conversation...
////Slashies in threes!
 
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