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(New Europe)   It's hard for Europe to call the shots when Russia sends us the gas bill   (neurope.eu ) divider line
    More: Obvious, Europe, Russia, Polish PM, Germany's Russian, Angela Merkel, prime ministers, sovereignty, gas producer  
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1174 clicks; posted to Business » on 11 Mar 2014 at 10:10 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



25 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-03-11 10:11:22 AM  
Hey Europe - we've got a shiat ton of natural gas here in North Dakota come and get...

graphics8.nytimes.com

Oh sh*t no we burned it off, so sorry.
 
2014-03-11 10:18:35 AM  

bdub77: Hey Europe - we've got a shiat ton of natural gas here in North Dakota come and get...

[graphics8.nytimes.com image 650x416]

Oh sh*t no we burned it off, so sorry.


We have restrictions for the export of LNG for some reason.  I'm sure somebody bribed somebody one day.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2014-03-11 10:24:07 AM  
MugzyBrown:

We have restrictions for the export of LNG for some reason.  I'm sure somebody bribed somebody one day.

It just has to be approved.  The problem is that you can't just pour it into a tanker, you need special ships and handling facilities to transport in in cooled liquid form.
 
2014-03-11 10:28:17 AM  

vpb: It just has to be approved.  The problem is that you can't just pour it into a tanker, you need special ships and handling facilities to transport in in cooled liquid form.


You say that like you can just make a call.

It just needs to be approved, no big whoop.
 
2014-03-11 10:32:37 AM  
To date, the U.S. government has conditionally granted export licenses to just five 
applications to export LNG. The application for the first project was pending for several months 
prior to approval, while the second, third, fourth and fifth applications were pending for more 
than two years prior to approval. The U.S. government is expected to grant more licenses and 
appears to be shortening the time between decisions, but many anticipate that it may take 
several more years to process the remaining license applications. In addition to the five 
approved applications, the DOE is considering 19 more LNG export licenses. Three of the 
remaining applications have been awaiting approval since 2011, while several others have 
been pending for many months. 
 
Given that each project can take five years or more from the DOE's approval to export, 
the current backlog of LNG export applications and the delay in approval translate to real 
economic costs. Many industry observers fear that certain projects may be delayed beyond the 
window of economic opportunity. The concern is heightened by new and planned export 
terminals in Canada, Australia and Africa, all of which will compete with the United States for 
Asian markets. 

http://www.nam.org/~/media/9CCC6B36723C4AEDB37F78C19EBE8971.ashx (p df)
 
2014-03-11 10:39:24 AM  

MugzyBrown: To date, the U.S. government has conditionally granted export licenses to just five
applications to export LNG. The application for the first project was pending for several months
prior to approval, while the second, third, fourth and fifth applications were pending for more
than two years prior to approval. The U.S. government is expected to grant more licenses and
appears to be shortening the time between decisions, but many anticipate that it may take
several more years to process the remaining license applications. In addition to the five
approved applications, the DOE is considering 19 more LNG export licenses. Three of the
remaining applications have been awaiting approval since 2011, while several others have
been pending for many months.

Given that each project can take five years or more from the DOE's approval to export,
the current backlog of LNG export applications and the delay in approval translate to real
economic costs. Many industry observers fear that certain projects may be delayed beyond the
window of economic opportunity. The concern is heightened by new and planned export
terminals in Canada, Australia and Africa, all of which will compete with the United States for
Asian markets.

http://www.nam.org/~/media/9CCC6B36723C4AEDB37F78C19EBE8971.ashx (p df)


I guess it has more to do with preventing the likes of...

www.ammonslaw.com
 
2014-03-11 10:45:07 AM  
Meh. Europe was already diversifying its gas sources before this Ukraine thing happened. Now with the world awash with gas, it's just a matter of time and building a global gas market. Ultimately, Russia needs Europe to buy its gas more than Europe needs Russia. At least 50% of the Russian government budget is from energy exports, if the Russians tried to mess with that they would only be hurting themselves. There wouldn't be enough money to hand out to loyal Putin supporters and pretty soon we would end up with massive street protests in Moskow. Putin understands this, which is why he's been so quiet on the gas issue.
 
2014-03-11 11:18:56 AM  
Ugh, I'd have to get out of bed to insert the link to The Tiger Lillies "Running out of gas" which you have to go through at least twice to get the joke.
 
2014-03-11 11:20:40 AM  
Submitter: You're incorrect and wrong.
 
2014-03-11 11:32:54 AM  

vpb: MugzyBrown:

We have restrictions for the export of LNG for some reason.  I'm sure somebody bribed somebody one day.

It just has to be approved.  The problem is that you can't just pour it into a tanker, you need special ships and handling facilities to transport in in cooled liquid form.


I saw a tanker for LNG it was the weirdest looking cargo ship that I have ever seen.
 
2014-03-11 01:16:17 PM  
I'm sure Libya will gladly ship LNG to Europe.
 
2014-03-11 01:25:09 PM  
Yes - this is what the fighting and posturing is all about.  Forget freedom, forget laws, forget the concept of right and wrong....

Russia having more control/influence in the Ukraine means higher prices for the the gas they export.  So the EU is against.
 
2014-03-11 01:28:31 PM  
Hmm..if only there was some way to get that gas to europe..

http://mobile.reuters.com/article/idU SL6N0M72GZ20140311?irpc=932
 
2014-03-11 01:35:38 PM  
Why shoot your largest customer in the foot?
 
2014-03-11 02:04:18 PM  
Europe might have to get all kissy-kissy with Israeli tuches.

East Mediterranean Eyes EU, Global LNG Markets
 
2014-03-11 02:18:15 PM  
The U.S.A. could always blow up Russia's(U.S.S.R.) natural gas pipeline, again.

/Mr. Ruskie. Tear down this fence. --Ronald Reagan
 
2014-03-11 02:37:54 PM  
Shut up Poland and go deal in stolen automobiles - it is your countries only use anyways.
 
2014-03-11 03:29:33 PM  

MugzyBrown: We have restrictions for the export of LNG for some reason. I'm sure somebody bribed somebody one day.


I think it has more to do with a reasonable fear that LNG tankers can level entire ports when their poorly paid Malaysian crew decides to "fark it, let's go get a smoke and then get back to work."
 
2014-03-11 03:49:04 PM  

spawn73: Submitter: You're incorrect and wrong.


This and that. Analysts are laughing at the notion that Russia has the EU over a barrel wrt gas. Not only do gas sales to the EU make up an incredible proportion of Russia's hard currency income, but EU financing of energy exploration and extraction is what's holding the Russian economy afloat. Moreover, the Russians basically don't make anything anyone needs, except 3rd rate weapons at cut-throat prices, so they essentially have nowhere to go but down if they try to play hardball with the EU.
 
2014-03-11 03:50:27 PM  
Germany turned its back on democracy in the Ukraine ten years ago and sold its soul to Putin for lucrative gas contracts.  No one ever really calls them on it though.
 
2014-03-11 04:33:53 PM  
Common first thought: "It's hard for Europe to call the shots when Russia sends us the gas bill."

Reality: "It's hard for Russia to get away with antagonizing Europe when much of their government's revenue is from gas sold to Europe."

//There's a reason countries with major trade partnerships don't usually go to war.
 
2014-03-11 05:38:27 PM  
i.imgur.com
 
2014-03-12 01:29:18 AM  

MugzyBrown: To date, the U.S. government has conditionally granted export licenses to just five 
applications to export LNG. The application for the first project was pending for several months 
prior to approval, while the second, third, fourth and fifth applications were pending for more 
than two years prior to approval. The U.S. government is expected to grant more licenses and 
appears to be shortening the time between decisions, but many anticipate that it may take 
several more years to process the remaining license applications. In addition to the five 
approved applications, the DOE is considering 19 more LNG export licenses. Three of the 
remaining applications have been awaiting approval since 2011, while several others have 
been pending for many months. 



Well, now that it has become such a geopolitical hot topic, I imagine some of those licenses may be expedited.  Obama would never move militarily, but I can't imagine him passing on the chance to take away Putin's trump card with respect to bullying Europe.
 
2014-03-12 07:27:16 AM  
Thanks...Afganistan
 
2014-03-12 08:53:05 AM  

Pumpernickel bread: Well, now that it has become such a geopolitical hot topic, I imagine some of those licenses may be expedited.  Obama would never move militarily, but I can't imagine him passing on the chance to take away Putin's trump card with respect to bullying Europe.


I wonder why it wasn't done before. I mean, Europe have already learned the dangers of being dependable on Russian gas from the first Ukrainian crisis, years ago. And then there was that whole Georgia/Osetia thing. I mean, it's not as if it's a new thing.

Or may be there are some other problems with the idea, and in such case Europe will continue to be dependent on Russia's gas no matter what...
 
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