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(RealClear)   Colorado collects $2 millon in recreational pot taxes. Who could have seen that coming? Oh, about 300 million Americans   (realclear.com) divider line 27
    More: Obvious, Colorado, state Department of Revenue, Americans, Colorado collects, excise taxes, sales taxes  
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4933 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Mar 2014 at 9:15 PM (32 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2014-03-10 08:26:57 PM  
10 votes:
I'm betting they saved more than that by not locking up pot smokers.
2014-03-10 09:31:29 PM  
4 votes:

Gyrfalcon: 45  state referendums to legalize pot private prison industries start spending SERIOUS lobby money to prevent any further legalization from state legislatures in 3...2...

FTFY

2014-03-10 09:24:10 PM  
4 votes:

Sgygus: violentsalvation: Oh, really?!

Ya really.  Apparently not incarcerating people for cannabis possession is costly.


That and their  bonus pool slush fund safety and training budget needs some help now that forfeitures aren't in the mix for pot anymore.
2014-03-10 08:36:30 PM  
3 votes:
Gov. John Hickenlooper already has sent the Legislature a detailed $134 million proposal for spending recreational and medical marijuana money, including new spending on anti-drug messaging to kids and more advertising discouraging driving while high.

State police chiefs have asked for more money, too.


Oh, really?!
2014-03-10 09:43:47 PM  
2 votes:

somemoron: I'm not a lawyer or government studiologist, so maybe someone familiar with the state vs federal system can chime in:

Let's say the feds never legalize pot at the national level... but all the states individually do.  What power/authority does the fed have in a case where no crime is committed at the state level, but on a federal level, if only on paper?  Is it even possible (legally) for the fed to maintain its illegality?

Doesn't have to be pot, could be anything.  Just curious about how this odd scenario would work out.


If it is on federal land, then there is a federal charge, if it crosses state borders, then there are other federal charges. But my guess is the Federal government will drops the legislation once a few more states start changing their laws.
2014-03-10 09:41:06 PM  
2 votes:
Now if only brothels were legal nationwide. Our national deficit would be wiped out AND we'd have enough funding for at least one Mars colony by the end of the year.
2014-03-10 09:30:28 PM  
2 votes:
It's only going to keep going up.  In most areas there isn't any shops that have received approval for recreational yet.  That number could easily double by mid-year.
2014-03-10 09:28:44 PM  
2 votes:

GanjSmokr: Sadly, I think it's way less than what they were expecting.

"Last year's pot vote guessed that the taxes would produce $70 million a year, and it's unclear what lawmakers can do with tax money that exceeds that figure.

Colorado's Joint Budget Committee plans a Wednesday briefing with lawyers to lay out their options for spending pot taxes beyond $70 million."

Unless my math is off, I don't think they're going to have to worry about that anytime soon.


There are still a lot of places that it will be legal to sell recreationally and just isn't yet. Boulder comes to mind, and I'm sure there are others. They won't hit $70 million this year, but the "per month" figure should pick up once more stores are opened.
2014-03-10 09:20:28 PM  
2 votes:
45 state referendums to legalize pot hit the legislatures in 3...2...
2014-03-11 03:54:25 PM  
1 votes:

dr_blasto: dywed88: somemoron: I'm not a lawyer or government studiologist, so maybe someone familiar with the state vs federal system can chime in:

Let's say the feds never legalize pot at the national level... but all the states individually do.  What power/authority does the fed have in a case where no crime is committed at the state level, but on a federal level, if only on paper?  Is it even possible (legally) for the fed to maintain its illegality?

Doesn't have to be pot, could be anything.  Just curious about how this odd scenario would work out.

The Feds have every legal right to bust your ass for having pot in your own living room and to charge the state licensed distributor who sold it to you with drug trafficking (and probably a lot of follow up crimes). Federal law trumps state law, plain and simple.

They have said they won't pursue minor possession or state approved activities off of Federal land. But that is an administrative policy and if the next President decided he really needed the law and order vote, there is nothing stopping him from reversing that policy.

They certainly do have the legal authority, but they do not have the personnel. The DEA isn't so massive that they could attack the legal pot "problem" at the user end. There is zero chance of them projecting that legal authority to the user base. They can and will perform the small busts of morons that need to challenge their authority directly. They may go after the larger pot businesses, but at some point the DEA and other alphabet agencies won't be able to chase down all the bits and pieces as there will simply be too many. They won't have the needed bandwidth with USAs and they will have a very difficult time with juries.

In the end, the IRS will be the only way to stop the pot industry.


"Gettin' up fo Alpha-Bits is EZ!"
s29.postimg.org
2014-03-11 08:36:31 AM  
1 votes:

fusillade762: I'm betting they saved more than that by not locking up pot smokers.

And not arming local police with military grade weapons and armor to bust down doors to look for the pot smokers.

2014-03-11 12:21:01 AM  
1 votes:
The majority of states just need to legalize it already.
The War on Drugs has been an epic failure that has done nothing but militarize our police and waste billions of dollars.
2014-03-10 11:22:52 PM  
1 votes:

TV's Vinnie: Now if only brothels were legal nationwide. Our national deficit would be wiped out AND we'd have enough funding for at least one Mars colony by the end of the year.


Legalize ALL consensual crimes.

You dont want to fark a whore? Then dont sleep with your wife.

But seriously, film the sex and it is legal porn, dont film it and it is illegal prostitution?
FARTARDS
2014-03-10 11:21:42 PM  
1 votes:
Meanwhile in Michigan, a medical marijuana state, the cops are spewing lies and using scare tactics via the local newspaper editorial page. The next day a local doctor rebutted and tore him a new one. Damage was done though

http://www.themorningsun.com/opinion/20140301/the-dangers-of-decrimi na lizing-marijuana
2014-03-10 11:08:21 PM  
1 votes:

Old Man Winter: I hope lawyers get involved. They will shiat themselves about secondhand marijuana M

arihuana  smoke and marijuanaMarihuana  causing autism. So much money in that.

...aaaaand we're back to 1931. Did anyone else get an accurate reading on the precise characteristics of that temporal shift so we can get back to the future.... again....
2014-03-10 10:49:11 PM  
1 votes:

somemoron: I'm not a lawyer or government studiologist, so maybe someone familiar with the state vs federal system can chime in:

Let's say the feds never legalize pot at the national level... but all the states individually do.  What power/authority does the fed have in a case where no crime is committed at the state level, but on a federal level, if only on paper?  Is it even possible (legally) for the fed to maintain its illegality?

Doesn't have to be pot, could be anything.  Just curious about how this odd scenario would work out.


Basically, Federal law always wins. BUT, the Feds lack the resources to effectively enforce most of the laws they pass. Especially a 'possession' crime like MJ. That is why states legalizing is such a big deal. With the Feds lacking the resources to enforce, if the states/locals won't or can't, it becomes an unenforceable law.

The Feds NEED the states and locals to enforce their laws or they don't mean shiat. There is a reason some Federal LEOs are freaking out and it's not just about MJ being legal, it's a direct and serious threat to Federal law enforcement authority.

//When you can't buy local help with drug war cash and toys, then what?
2014-03-10 10:34:17 PM  
1 votes:
Who gives a shiat about the tax revenue? How about legalizing it because it's the right thing to do? Everything else is just a side effect.

somemoron: I'm not a lawyer or government studiologist, so maybe someone familiar with the state vs federal system can chime in:

Let's say the feds never legalize pot at the national level... but all the states individually do.  What power/authority does the fed have in a case where no crime is committed at the state level, but on a federal level, if only on paper?  Is it even possible (legally) for the fed to maintain its illegality?

Doesn't have to be pot, could be anything.  Just curious about how this odd scenario would work out.


Depends on whether the feds have their own enforcement capabilities. As far as I know, treason isn't a crime in any particular state but you can bet your ass the feds can enforce that one. And given the budget and reach of the DEA, if the feds really wanted to put the screws down they'd have no problem doing so.

And the power of the purse can be a lot stronger than anything else... "Nice lower-than-we-like drinking age you have there. Be a shame if anything happened to that highway funding you get from us." Sound familiar?
2014-03-10 10:20:19 PM  
1 votes:
Here's a wiki for Colorado's TABOR law:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taxpayer_Bill_of_Rights
2014-03-10 10:10:35 PM  
1 votes:
Marijuana is a gateway drug to even better marijuana.
Or something.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dy4rA_esYo0no ON
 Salvia. No one ever mentions salvia.
2014-03-10 09:45:07 PM  
1 votes:
Between the taxes and the money they'll save on trials and jail space, I'll bet you see more states doing this.
2014-03-10 09:41:52 PM  
1 votes:
I'm not a lawyer or government studiologist, so maybe someone familiar with the state vs federal system can chime in:

Let's say the feds never legalize pot at the national level... but all the states individually do.  What power/authority does the fed have in a case where no crime is committed at the state level, but on a federal level, if only on paper?  Is it even possible (legally) for the fed to maintain its illegality?

Doesn't have to be pot, could be anything.  Just curious about how this odd scenario would work out.
2014-03-10 09:40:11 PM  
1 votes:
Just for shiats and grins I pulled up the Amtrak site to see what an Orlando to Denver trip would be like. Four days, three different trains, and nearly $300 one way for a coach seat. fml

/need someone on this side of the Mississippi to go "fark it... make it legal"
//was hoping for North Carolina but they've been going 'pants on head on fire' the last few years
///farkin' teabaggers ruin everything
2014-03-10 09:38:05 PM  
1 votes:
This is what will make the other states fall in line like dominoes.
2014-03-10 09:37:53 PM  
1 votes:

uber humper: What's Colorado's budget deficit? $500 million or so?


zero.  Seriously, look it up.
2014-03-10 09:35:33 PM  
1 votes:
localtvwjw.files.wordpress.com

what $14 million in pot looks like based on current police estimates.
2014-03-10 09:27:45 PM  
1 votes:
Next thing they'll be telling us is licensing and checking ID's helps keep abusable substances out of the hands of minors by creating a trail of accountability.

What about keeping funds out of the hands of underground drug gangs? Stupid potheads.
2014-03-10 09:23:12 PM  
1 votes:
"There probably is a tendency to want to just grab on to this revenue from marijuana and feed my own pet projects, and I don't think it's going to be that simple," said Sen. Kent Lambert, R-Colorado Springs and another committee member.

Yay revenue.
 
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