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(Slate)   Man tests a 3-D printer target for home use, winds up printing out a giant pile of goo. "You'll never need one of these infernal machines at home"   (slate.com) divider line 228
    More: Unlikely, whales, prints, printers, cup holders, Microbotics, tweezers, ABS plastic, table tennises  
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14477 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Mar 2014 at 8:36 AM (42 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-10 08:31:34 AM  
Person bad at something they've never done before, news at 11.
 
2014-03-10 08:38:19 AM  
"My inability to use this product invalidates it."
 
2014-03-10 08:41:42 AM  
Who needs a $1,000 3D printing machine to make a huge pile of goo?

/right, Rosie?!?
 
2014-03-10 08:41:46 AM  

LasersHurt: "My inability to use this product invalidates it."


You joke, but it kind of does - if they're testing the viability of it being an common appliance rather than a geek toy, they need to throw idiots at it and have it still succeed
 
2014-03-10 08:41:57 AM  
Send this man a meat slicer, a soldering iron, and an AR-15 to review, STAT!
 
2014-03-10 08:42:23 AM  
See? Getting banned from Fark and you can write interdasting articles for Slate!
 
2014-03-10 08:42:41 AM  

LasersHurt: "My inability to use this product invalidates it."


You can say the same thing about cars, guns, birth control, green energy, anything. You can't engineer intelligent customers.
 
2014-03-10 08:42:42 AM  

Subby's Mother: they need to throw idiots at it and have it still succeed


So that's how AOL survives.
 
2014-03-10 08:43:39 AM  

vudukungfu: Send this man a meat slicer, a soldering iron, and an AR-15 to review, STAT!


at the same time?
That could be interesting, though he'll probably have to dictate the review
 
2014-03-10 08:43:40 AM  

Fano: See? Getting banned from Fark and you can write interdasting articles for Slate!


He didn't get banned, he just left
 
2014-03-10 08:44:09 AM  

Subby's Mother: LasersHurt: "My inability to use this product invalidates it."

You joke, but it kind of does - if they're testing the viability of it being an common appliance rather than a geek toy, they need to throw idiots at it and have it still succeed


I wonder how the first home radio devices worked?
 
2014-03-10 08:44:14 AM  
FTFA:
Some folks might enjoy making various DIY widgets at home, as a hobby, iterating their own designs and creating new products. Bully for them. I liken these early adopters to the kind of people who were on ham radios in 1923.

So basically, this first iteration is where the techno-weenies start making improvements and making the technology smaller, more capable, and easier for the dumbshiats to figure out?

I'm actually kind of laughing at the guy:  We're all so used to "Plug n' Play" type devices that spending the time necessary to get something on the bleeding edge of technology to work well is "frustrating".  Good for you.  Go back to playing Talking Tom on your iPad.
 
2014-03-10 08:45:19 AM  

duffblue: You can't engineer intelligent customers.


This needs to be on giant motivational posters in every R&D facility everywhere.
 
2014-03-10 08:46:04 AM  

the_sidewinder: Fano: See? Getting banned from Fark and you can write interdasting articles for Slate!

He didn't get banned, he just left


thank god for small mercies.
 
2014-03-10 08:46:48 AM  
I'm having a similar experience with a cnc router. It's taken about 30 hours to really get the amateur hang of it. I still have a long way to go.
 
2014-03-10 08:46:49 AM  
I'm satisfied that the poor results from his 3D printer adequately represent the viability of the technology as a whole.
 
2014-03-10 08:47:51 AM  

Subby's Mother: LasersHurt: "My inability to use this product invalidates it."

You joke, but it kind of does - if they're testing the viability of it being an common appliance rather than a geek toy, they need to throw idiots at it and have it still succeed


It's pretty early on - too early to assume we've reached "consumer" levels (that is to say, average/dumb consumers).

That said, I was sort of reacting to "never", which it turns out is in the headline only and not in the article. So, I temper my judgment slightly.
 
2014-03-10 08:48:16 AM  

dittybopper: FTFA:
Some folks might enjoy making various DIY widgets at home, as a hobby, iterating their own designs and creating new products. Bully for them. I liken these early adopters to the kind of people who were on ham radios in 1923.

So basically, this first iteration is where the techno-weenies start making improvements and making the technology smaller, more capable, and easier for the dumbshiats to figure out?

I'm actually kind of laughing at the guy:  We're all so used to "Plug n' Play" type devices that spending the time necessary to get something on the bleeding edge of technology to work well is "frustrating".  Good for you.  Go back to playing Talking Tom on your iPad.


HA!  Joke's on you!  It's Flappy Birds!

/pwn3d1!18
 
2014-03-10 08:49:28 AM  
So you're telling me that...

1) brand-new technology is better suited for knowledgable early-adopter enthusiasts than for Joe iPad?
2) the future potential uses for new technology might not be immediately apparent to non-enthusiasts, leading them erroneously to believe that just because they have no use for such technology now, they won't EVER have a use for it?

Get out!

/my first MP3 player only held 64 MB or about 8-10 songs. So many friends laughed: "my CDs have more music than that!"
 
2014-03-10 08:49:42 AM  

Fano: Subby's Mother: LasersHurt: "My inability to use this product invalidates it."

You joke, but it kind of does - if they're testing the viability of it being an common appliance rather than a geek toy, they need to throw idiots at it and have it still succeed

I wonder how the first home radio devices worked?


Or home computers - like an Altair 8800 in 1975.
 
2014-03-10 08:50:53 AM  
I need to get one of my friends who have a 3D printer to make me a replacement part for my coffee grinder. Lucky for me, someone already made the model on Thingiverse
 
2014-03-10 08:53:53 AM  
A man vs. machine giant pile of goo-off, would make for a great pornographic John Henry.
 
2014-03-10 08:56:32 AM  

the_sidewinder: Fano: See? Getting banned from Fark and you can write interdasting articles for Slate!

He didn't get banned, he just left


No, he died. Possibly of severe grump when some kids wouldn't get off his lawn with their toy spaceships that they taunted were 3d printed. So sad. Such a waste. He had so much more grump left to give. Now how will we ever get research into life extension done?
 
2014-03-10 08:57:53 AM  
Obviously the guy is not technically inclined, and instead should spend his time making his blog not suck.
 
2014-03-10 08:58:26 AM  
Article aside, you are still talking 1000 for a machine that most people won't be able to use beyond making common items you can get at the store. It will need to come down in price, and be simplified to the point the average person can customize the designs before 3d printing takes off.
 
2014-03-10 08:58:55 AM  
All his failure aside, he did raise a good question:

"What could you manufacture at home in a manner that's cheaper and more efficient than could be done in a giant factory? I'm open to ideas. If "customizable, personal designs" is part of your answer, remember that those designs will be limited to plastic, and that any use of wood or metal or suede will require additional procurement and assemblage, which means speed and convenience are out the window. There were very sound reasons behind society's transition to centralized manufacturing. "

He also compared the 3D-printer to a sewing machine, which I think is a very apt analogy.  A sewing machine is a very powerful device, everyone wears clothes, so you think it would be used everywhere.  Yet even my mother's own sewing machine gets used about once every couple of years.
 
2014-03-10 08:59:52 AM  
I remember my first dot matrix printer and how much hassle it was to keep the ribbon in place and everything working.

Who am I kidding, the thing was a beast!
 
2014-03-10 09:00:16 AM  
White guy: I can't figure it out or understand it therefore it is useless to all mankind.

This is how all male Republicans feel about women.
 
2014-03-10 09:01:14 AM  
CEO: "Ok, let's move onto Finance. Bill, how many Solidoodle units do we need to sell to re-cap the VC money we've burned through so far?"

CFO: "22,945,239 at full retail of $999.95. At the current product run rate, we should reach that goal in 459 years."

CEO: "So that's not good. We need to cut expenses. Let the IT and research teams go and outsource the workload to India."

CFO: "Will do."

CEO: "Is there anything else? ... Well then, let's get a sushi chef in here to make us a bite of dinner. And break out another bottle of that 25 year old McCallan! This calls for a celebration! And call those hookers we had in here lat week. Those gals really knew their stuff."
 
2014-03-10 09:05:48 AM  
Assuming he did get it to work, what is the killer app for home plastic 3-d printing? Thousands of statues and trinkets? Yeah sure there are plenty of industrial uses for even plastic 3-d printing, but what would be the point of having a printer in every home?
 
2014-03-10 09:10:06 AM  

Sidecrab: Assuming he did get it to work, what is the killer app for home plastic 3-d printing? Thousands of statues and trinkets? Yeah sure there are plenty of industrial uses for even plastic 3-d printing, but what would be the point of having a printer in every home?


Probably not much of a point from a practical basis. The person who designs a $200-300 printer that allows people's kids to make whatever art design they want will become very rich.
 
2014-03-10 09:10:54 AM  
Clearly, nobody here in this thread has used a solidoodle. If you had, you would not be throwing shade his way.
You're right: it is early days. But as I sit here, waiting for the slicer to compute my model, after attempting yet again to get the z-height correct so that it'll lay down *just* the right amount of ABS so that it'll stick to the bed, yet not so much that the extruder will bump into that which has already extruded, I will say he has a point.
There is a lot to that what he says, grumpy and sure-to-be-wrong-in-20-years as it is. This is not a device if you're expecting point and click.
The aquanet tip is great, though. I'll have to get some. Now to warm up the bed and see how it goes this time.
 
2014-03-10 09:12:00 AM  
People still use bubblejet printers and they're as reliable as a weather forecast.
 
2014-03-10 09:14:47 AM  
I, for one, would LOVE a goo-making 3D printer. I'm sick & tired of making goo by hand.
Having a machine do it would allow me more time to think-up bad jokes about masturbation.
 
2014-03-10 09:14:54 AM  

dittybopper: FTFA:
Some folks might enjoy making various DIY widgets at home, as a hobby, iterating their own designs and creating new products. Bully for them. I liken these early adopters to the kind of people who were on ham radios in 1923.

So basically, this first iteration is where the techno-weenies start making improvements and making the technology smaller, more capable, and easier for the dumbshiats to figure out?

I'm actually kind of laughing at the guy:  We're all so used to "Plug n' Play" type devices that spending the time necessary to get something on the bleeding edge of technology to work well is "frustrating".  Good for you.  Go back to playing Talking Tom on your iPad.


This is really the crux of it.

Apple fooled idiots into thinking they were tech savvy. So now, when a new product hits the market, if it isn't iEasy to use it immediately alienates a large portion of the public.

I'm OK with this.
 
2014-03-10 09:18:07 AM  

Copperbelly watersnake: Probably not much of a point from a practical basis. The person who designs a $200-300 printer that allows people's kids to make whatever art design they want will become very rich.


Yeah if they could make one for that range and print something smallish that I could give to my kids and let them build their own stuff I would buy one.  I've been tempted at $1k but it's just too steep for what I would use it for.
 
2014-03-10 09:18:48 AM  
I use my Mendel to print parts for model trains and strange lego pieces. I still have to spend time on my dremmel to make the parts perfect. It also took me many evenings to get the thing to print semi-reliably. I share his opinion that it isn't the killer app that will forever shatter our consumer oriented economy. It's a ton of fun for a geek like me though.
 
2014-03-10 09:19:25 AM  
I keep hearing people talk about using 3D printers to print replacement automotive parts so you don't have to go junkyard shopping or pay through the nose at a dealership.  Assuming it's possible to do this today, does the end product have the same characteristics as a forged or machined part: strength, toughness, ductility, weldability, and durability?  I'd hate to buy a printed part off some schmuck on eBay only to have it sheer off while I'm going 70 mph on the highway.
 
2014-03-10 09:20:06 AM  
Bet he was trying to make a fleshlight.
 
2014-03-10 09:20:14 AM  

Sidecrab: Assuming he did get it to work, what is the killer app for home plastic 3-d printing? Thousands of statues and trinkets? Yeah sure there are plenty of industrial uses for even plastic 3-d printing, but what would be the point of having a printer in every home?


Dildos. Lots and lots of dildos. But no seriously, anyone who can turn a wrench would probably have a use for one, so maybe 2% of the population. As would anyone who tried to fix a broken children's toy. But I guess if you would rather throw something away than fix it or have no imagination, you'd have little to no use.
 
2014-03-10 09:20:17 AM  

moeburn: All his failure aside, he did raise a good question:


He also compared the 3D-printer to a sewing machine, which I think is a very apt analogy.  A sewing machine is a very powerful device, everyone wears clothes, so you think it would be used everywhere.  Yet even my mother's own sewing machine gets used about once every couple of years.


But, only since the rise of our cheaper, throw away culture.  Lots of people are still sewing, and using other things like ham radios; it's just that most people want it right now.  Doesn't matter if it falls apart a few washes later, or the programs are more complicated to locate.

I want one just because I missed out on emerging tech as a kid, and I want to be one of those old farts that people come to in later years to ask about the good old days.  Watching my grandma exclaim over a sewing machine that used electricity instead of a foot treadle was still brings a smile, 40 years later.
 
2014-03-10 09:21:25 AM  
Also its very, very, very slow.

valkore: I keep hearing people talk about using 3D printers to print replacement automotive parts so you don't have to go junkyard shopping or pay through the nose at a dealership.  Assuming it's possible to do this today, does the end product have the same characteristics as a forged or machined part: strength, toughness, ductility, weldability, and durability?  I'd hate to buy a printed part off some schmuck on eBay only to have it sheer off while I'm going 70 mph on the highway.


You can print in ABS plastic but because of the layered manufacturing its nowhere near as strong as a cast or molded single piece. I'd have no problem with a throttle lever or a switch on your dash but your bumper would be dangerous.
 
2014-03-10 09:23:52 AM  

jaybeezey: Apple fooled idiots into thinking they were tech savvy.


Most oft heard moron-twitting by someone who can't afford an iPad and wouldn't know where to start with a UNIX-based OS.
 
2014-03-10 09:24:11 AM  

jaybeezey: dittybopper: FTFA:
Some folks might enjoy making various DIY widgets at home, as a hobby, iterating their own designs and creating new products. Bully for them. I liken these early adopters to the kind of people who were on ham radios in 1923.

So basically, this first iteration is where the techno-weenies start making improvements and making the technology smaller, more capable, and easier for the dumbshiats to figure out?

I'm actually kind of laughing at the guy:  We're all so used to "Plug n' Play" type devices that spending the time necessary to get something on the bleeding edge of technology to work well is "frustrating".  Good for you.  Go back to playing Talking Tom on your iPad.

This is really the crux of it.

Apple fooled idiots into thinking they were tech savvy. So now, when a new product hits the market, if it isn't iEasy to use it immediately alienates a large portion of the public.

I'm OK with this.


Apply will be making a 3D printer - in about 10 years, when everyone else has worked out the hard stuff, and they can just make a shiny, white one with rounded corners.
 
2014-03-10 09:24:54 AM  

Slaxl: the_sidewinder: Fano: See? Getting banned from Fark and you can write interdasting articles for Slate!

He didn't get banned, he just left

No, he died. Possibly of severe grump when some kids wouldn't get off his lawn with their toy spaceships that they taunted were 3d printed. So sad. Such a waste. He had so much more grump left to give. Now how will we ever get research into life extension done?


Annnnnd favorited.  The whole time I was reading the article I kept wondering where the Apostrophe was in the guy's name.
 
2014-03-10 09:25:15 AM  
I'm not a fan of his analogy to the sewing machine. Maybe my wife just uses hers more than most people who own them these days.
She's 33 and makes her own uniforms for work (RNn so just scrubs), makes skirts and dresses for our daughter, pajamas for all three kids, curtains for our house, etc. I use it to make bags, top quilts, and underquilts for hiking/camping and there are several sites where people share patterns for that kind of stuff.
 
2014-03-10 09:25:51 AM  

CheekyMonkey: Apply will be making a 3D printer - in about 10 years, when everyone else has worked out the hard stuff, and they can just make a shiny, white one with rounded corners.


It's just as terrible as Apple: http://cubify.com/Products/Cube2TechSpecs
 
2014-03-10 09:27:48 AM  

JackieRabbit: CEO: "Ok, let's move onto Finance. Bill, how many Solidoodle units do we need to sell to re-cap the VC money we've burned through so far?"

CFO: "22,945,239 at full retail of $999.95. At the current product run rate, we should reach that goal in 459 years."

CEO: "So that's not good. We need to cut expenses. Let the IT and research teams go and outsource the workload to India."

CFO: "Will do."

CEO: "Is there anything else? ... Well then, let's get a sushi chef in here to make us a bite of dinner. And break out another bottle of that 25 year old McCallan! This calls for a celebration! And call those hookers we had in here lat week. Those gals really knew their stuff."


Sushi and scotch? Your palate might need to be recalibrated.
 
2014-03-10 09:28:34 AM  
The guy is obviously not terribly mechanically/technologically inclined, but he does have a point. 3D printing, in the stage it's in now is really only good for hobbyists and people with lots of patience. Unless/until 3D printers can do multiple materials and be as simple as loading a design spec you found online, ubiquitous home 3D printing is still a long ways off and there's no reason for your average Joe Schmoe to get one.

That said, its current applications in the medical fields and in prototyping are showing great promise.
 
2014-03-10 09:29:30 AM  

Copperbelly watersnake: The person who designs a $200-300 printer that allows people's kids to make whatever art design they want will become very rich.


Here you go ...

www.spookshows.com

Mmmmm ... the smell of melting plastic.
 
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