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(UPI)   Are you smarter than a preschooler? New research suggests not   (upi.com) divider line 45
    More: Interesting, developmental psychologist, preschools, abstracts  
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5307 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Mar 2014 at 8:09 PM (41 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



45 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-03-09 08:01:51 PM  
Then we spend the next 12 Years teaching them to think inside the box.
 
2014-03-09 08:11:52 PM  
Yeah, but I can kick their asses!
 
2014-03-09 08:14:35 PM  
Hey these boogers aint gonna eat themselves!
 
2014-03-09 08:15:30 PM  
I'm reminded of this every time I spend time with the grandkids.
 
2014-03-09 08:20:55 PM  
I'm at least much more experienced

/and bitter
 
2014-03-09 08:21:53 PM  
"help them outperform adults in figuring out how unusual toys and gadgets work."

I'm sure any parent out there can back me up on this, whoever did that study doesn't know shiat about kids. As the father of five kids I can assure you that kids give up on shiat pretty fast, that's when they hand it to dear old dad to figure out for them.
 
2014-03-09 08:25:18 PM  
Kids these days are so smart. They're cooler and sexier too. My neighbor's 7-year old has a 9" prick, rides a motorcycle, and has a wicked hot model girlfriend. You'd think he'd be a huge asshole, but he runs this Italian deli on Fairfax and every time I go in he's like, "Hey Unca F, any sanwich you want. For fwee. On da house." Total bro on every level. He knows this guy who gets him the new "Lots and Lots of Trains" DVDs like three months before they're released, and he always spots me a copy. Like how am I suppose to compete with a kid that?
 
2014-03-09 08:29:34 PM  
Why?

/Why?
//Why?
///Why?
 
2014-03-09 08:30:15 PM  
Is this about Occam's Razor?
 
2014-03-09 08:33:11 PM  
Jeff Foxworthy could host that show, and people would still lose.
 
2014-03-09 08:38:51 PM  
So, small kids are on par with orangutangs for fiddling with things.
 
2014-03-09 08:41:19 PM  
The face of you is the blicket!
 
2014-03-09 08:45:03 PM  
FTA: "Now, scientists say a preschooler's way of thinking -- having more flexible and less biased ideas about cause and effect -- can help them outperform adults in figuring out how unusual toys and gadgets work."

On the other hand, I rather enjoy having experience to draw on when making decisions.

"Why did you throw the iPad in the bathtub?"
"I wanted to see what would happen."
 
2014-03-09 08:48:52 PM  
Sounds Like Everyone Owes Jaden Smith An Apology.
 
2014-03-09 08:52:30 PM  

ReapTheChaos: "help them outperform adults in figuring out how unusual toys and gadgets work."

I'm sure any parent out there can back me up on this, whoever did that study doesn't know shiat about kids. As the father of five kids I can assure you that kids give up on shiat pretty fast, that's when they hand it to dear old dad to figure out for them.


This. The only advantage kids have is all day long to figure out the shiat they want.
 
2014-03-09 08:55:09 PM  
Wait, so I just read the article. Basically they constantly changed the rules of the game so that what was a winning move last round now isn't, and some new random combination is now a winner? Isn't this like asking them to take a multiple choice test without telling them they're suppose to pick any answer other than the correct one?
 
2014-03-09 08:58:38 PM  

Splish: Wait, so I just read the article. Basically they constantly changed the rules of the game so that what was a winning move last round now isn't, and some new random combination is now a winner? Isn't this like asking them to take a multiple choice test without telling them they're suppose to pick any answer other than the correct one?


So, a subtle variation on "darts trounce pros?" I guess this has implications for the Calvinball World Cup.
 
2014-03-09 09:00:08 PM  

Splish: Basically they constantly changed the rules of the game so that what was a winning move last round now isn't


Welcome to the 21st Century American economy.
 
2014-03-09 09:00:27 PM  
If I understand the article correctly, there was a constantly changing set of rules.  The adults would figure out the rule form the previous set, then the rule would change and they were wrong.  A child who was essentially choosing random blocks performed better because they weren't trying to use previously learned rules.

Example, if I tell you to count to 5 you can do it better than a preschooler because you know the rules of counting.  If I randomly decide that the the numbers 1 through 5 go 1, 3, 4, 2, 5 a preschooler will do better through random guessing than you will because your first try will be 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.
 
2014-03-09 09:00:57 PM  
img.fark.net
 
2014-03-09 09:03:00 PM  
My preschooler apparently thinks that preschool is the time where she can plan play dates with her friends, talk about different princess movies and 'break up' with boys in class. She's 5. I can already see what her future school career will look like.
 
2014-03-09 09:06:41 PM  
Can someone just post the damn xkcd/PHD comic and close this thread?

/scientists: children's brains have to learn to understand the world they've suddenly found themselves living in; adults already know how to continue surviving
//reporter: HAHA UR dumber then baby!
 
2014-03-09 09:10:36 PM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: FTA: "Now, scientists say a preschooler's way of thinking -- having more flexible and less biased ideas about cause and effect -- can help them outperform adults in figuring out how unusual toys and gadgets work."

On the other hand, I rather enjoy having experience to draw on when making decisions.

"Why did you throw the iPad in the bathtub?"
"I wanted to see what would happen."


But what if it makes it BETTER, what then, smart guy?

Off to fly off the roof with my umbrella with racing stripes
 
2014-03-09 09:14:35 PM  

RogermcAllen: The adults would figure out the rule form the previous set, then the rule would change and they were wrong.  A child who was essentially choosing random blocks performed better because they weren't trying to use previously learned rules.


The article describes it poorly, but your understanding is not correct.  The sets required to win the game are explicitlynot random, and random guessing doesnot explain the superior performance of the children.

The specific set of blocks required to activate the lights changed regularly, but not randomly -- it had a defined relationship to previously correct sets. For example, if red worked by itself, sets containing red might not work in future trials. Or if red and blue worked together the next set might need to contain one of those two to work, and the set after that might require the other.
 
2014-03-09 09:16:38 PM  
*click*
Oh.
The task is learning how to operate a new electronic device.
Of course they're "smarter" at that.
Duh.
 
2014-03-09 09:29:54 PM  

profplump: RogermcAllen: The adults would figure out the rule form the previous set, then the rule would change and they were wrong.  A child who was essentially choosing random blocks performed better because they weren't trying to use previously learned rules.

The article describes it poorly, but your understanding is not correct.  The sets required to win the game are explicitlynot random, and random guessing doesnot explain the superior performance of the children.

The specific set of blocks required to activate the lights changed regularly, but not randomly -- it had a defined relationship to previously correct sets. For example, if red worked by itself, sets containing red might not work in future trials. Or if red and blue worked together the next set might need to contain one of those two to work, and the set after that might require the other.


The way you described it makes it sound random.
 
2014-03-09 09:31:08 PM  
1. How do you put a giraffe into a refrigerator?
Correct Answer: Open the refrigerator, put in the giraffe, and close the door. This question tests whether you tend to do simple things in an overly complicated way.
2. How do you put an elephant into a refrigerator?
Did you say, Open the refrigerator, put in the elephant, and close the refrigerator?
Wrong Answer.
Correct Answer: Open the refrigerator, take out the giraffe, put in the elephant and close the door. This tests your ability to think through the repercussions of your previous actions.
3. The Lion King is hosting an animal conference. All the animals attend.... except one. Which animal does not attend?
Correct Answer: The Elephant. The elephant is in the refrigerator. You just put him in there. This tests your memory.
Okay, even if you did not answer the first three questions correctly, you still have one more chance to show your true abilities.
4. There is a river you must cross but it is used by crocodiles, and you do not have a boat. How do you manage it?
Correct Answer: You jump into the river and swim across. Have you not been listening? All the crocodiles are attending the Animal Meeting.
 
2014-03-09 09:32:44 PM  
Next up, to see if urban kids are better at identifying blickets, especially the ones that are blickity blickity black.
 
2014-03-09 09:41:35 PM  
Wait until the weight of the world crushes their little spirits.
 
2014-03-09 10:26:27 PM  
If adults had the luxury of spending all day every day mucking about with a bunch of random stuff in a nearly cost-free, risk-free, expectation-free and consequence-free environment, they'd be able to come up with some pretty creative shiat too. Adults don't learn the same way because years of having to triage makes them try to quickly focus on the perceived goal and most likely (based on their knowledge and experience) effective methods to achieve it.
 
2014-03-09 10:38:21 PM  
It isn't intelligence they're testing for, it's arrogance. When you assume you know an answer you're less likely to think with flexibility. Kids do that less.
 
2014-03-09 10:38:21 PM  
Intelligence is not knowledge.

Adults are knowledgeable. They know many things.

Kids are intelligent. They rapidly form connections between things and assimilate new data.
 
2014-03-09 10:38:52 PM  
I don't eat paste, so yeah, I am.
 
2014-03-09 10:57:48 PM  

bborchar: My preschooler apparently thinks that preschool is the time where she can plan play dates with her friends, talk about different princess movies and 'break up' with boys in class. She's 5. I can already see what her future school career will look like.


Are you letting her watch the Disney channel or something?
 
2014-03-09 11:03:31 PM  
Of course pre-schoolers are more intelligent than adults. Isn't this already well established? Just consider how many new things they have to master each year. It's staggering in comparison to simply building onto an already broad base of knowledge like an adult does.
 
2014-03-09 11:12:22 PM  

Robert1966: Of course pre-schoolers are more intelligent than adults. Isn't this already well established? Just consider how many new things they have to master each year. It's staggering in comparison to simply building onto an already broad base of knowledge like an adult does.


Given how quickly little kids can pick up new languages, I would tend to agree with you...
 
2014-03-09 11:38:34 PM  

moeburn: 1. How do you put a giraffe into a refrigerator?
Correct Answer: Open the refrigerator, put in the giraffe, and close the door. This question tests whether you tend to do simple things in an overly complicated way.
2. How do you put an elephant into a refrigerator?
Did you say, Open the refrigerator, put in the elephant, and close the refrigerator?
Wrong Answer.
Correct Answer: Open the refrigerator, take out the giraffe, put in the elephant and close the door. This tests your ability to think through the repercussions of your previous actions.
3. The Lion King is hosting an animal conference. All the animals attend.... except one. Which animal does not attend?
Correct Answer: The Elephant. The elephant is in the refrigerator. You just put him in there. This tests your memory.
Okay, even if you did not answer the first three questions correctly, you still have one more chance to show your true abilities.
4. There is a river you must cross but it is used by crocodiles, and you do not have a boat. How do you manage it?
Correct Answer: You jump into the river and swim across. Have you not been listening? All the crocodiles are attending the Animal Meeting.


I've seen this before, and it's kind of silly. It presupposes that all of the questions are linear and related.  For example, question 2 says "a refrigerator" - one can not necessarily assume it's the same refrigerator as question 1. What if you failed to answer question 1 correctly? The giraffe would not be in the refrigerator, so you wouldn't have to remove it first.

Besides, if I had both a giraffe and an elephant, I'd like to think I could afford more than one fridge.
 
2014-03-09 11:43:00 PM  
Doesn't surprise me they couldn't find anyone smarter than a preschooler in Berkeley.
 
2014-03-10 12:35:02 AM  

ImpendingCynic: moeburn: 1. How do you put a giraffe into a refrigerator?
Correct Answer: Open the refrigerator, put in the giraffe, and close the door. This question tests whether you tend to do simple things in an overly complicated way.
2. How do you put an elephant into a refrigerator?
Did you say, Open the refrigerator, put in the elephant, and close the refrigerator?
Wrong Answer.
Correct Answer: Open the refrigerator, take out the giraffe, put in the elephant and close the door. This tests your ability to think through the repercussions of your previous actions.
3. The Lion King is hosting an animal conference. All the animals attend.... except one. Which animal does not attend?
Correct Answer: The Elephant. The elephant is in the refrigerator. You just put him in there. This tests your memory.
Okay, even if you did not answer the first three questions correctly, you still have one more chance to show your true abilities.
4. There is a river you must cross but it is used by crocodiles, and you do not have a boat. How do you manage it?
Correct Answer: You jump into the river and swim across. Have you not been listening? All the crocodiles are attending the Animal Meeting.

I've seen this before, and it's kind of silly. It presupposes that all of the questions are linear and related.  For example, question 2 says "a refrigerator" - one can not necessarily assume it's the same refrigerator as question 1. What if you failed to answer question 1 correctly? The giraffe would not be in the refrigerator, so you wouldn't have to remove it first.

Besides, if I had both a giraffe and an elephant, I'd like to think I could afford more than one fridge.


Is anybody trying to honestly use this as a test of intelligence and not just a joke?  If that's the kind of question that labels kids as smarter than adults, we're doomed.  Congratulations kid, you told me to do something that's impractical at best, but probably impossible.  Straight to management with you!

- Incorrectly assumes that the fridge can not hold both animals at the same time.  Given that a common fridge can't hold either animal, an uncommon one might as well be really big.
- Assuming some practical reality has prevented us from building the really big fridge, we now have to assume that the fridge is tall enough to hold a giraffe and wide enough to hold an elephant.  That means that regardless of which animal is in there, you'll be spending serious money on electricity to cool all that air.  If either animal is refrigerated for a substantial amount of time, the cost of a custom fitted fridge is going to pay for itself.
- How am I supposed to swim across a river while I'm busy attending a meeting for "all the animals"?

This is where I would close the ticket as unactionable and my boss would come by to lecture me about the importance of being a team player.
 
2014-03-10 01:11:30 AM  
Glad to see The Onion is licensing out their content.
 
2014-03-10 01:16:09 AM  
We already know that their capacity for learning and flexibility is greater than an adult's. It has to be.

That said, I'm stronger and I know more, so I'm pretty sure I could beat them at everything else.
 
2014-03-10 02:20:20 AM  

moeburn: 1. How do you put a giraffe into a refrigerator?
Correct Answer: Open the refrigerator, put in the giraffe, and close the door. This question tests whether you tend to do simple things in an overly complicated way.
2. How do you put an elephant into a refrigerator?
Did you say, Open the refrigerator, put in the elephant, and close the refrigerator?
Wrong Answer.
Correct Answer: Open the refrigerator, take out the giraffe, put in the elephant and close the door. This tests your ability to think through the repercussions of your previous actions.
.


See, this how I KNOW you don't think like a kid. Because if you told a kid that his answer to question two was wrong, he would say "nuh-uh. It was a really BIG refrigerator."
 
2014-03-10 11:07:59 AM  
Isn't "Blickets" something from Max Headroom? Or am I mentally combining Blipverts and Whackets?
 
2014-03-10 12:39:35 PM  

NobleHam: We already know that their capacity for learning and flexibility is greater than an adult's. It has to be.

That said, I'm stronger and I know more, so I'm pretty sure I could beat them at everything else.


You don't have to be smart to beat up a bunch of kids. I could probably take an entire second grade class all by myself. Your intelligence is irrelevant, suck it kids.
 
2014-03-10 01:11:10 PM  
Younger minds have greater plasticity and therefore are more highly adaptable. This is an amazing quality for accumulating the necessary experiences needed for later survival, with current survival owed to the previous generation.
 
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