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(DFW Star-Telegram)   225 home subdivision being built over Native American burial grounds by developer too young to watch '80s movies. They're heeeeere   (star-telegram.com) divider line 54
    More: Scary, Texas State University, Central Texas, human bones, KB Home, Austin American-Statesman  
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5307 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Mar 2014 at 6:27 PM (27 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-09 05:17:34 PM
Hopefully they moved the bodies too.
 
2014-03-09 05:25:12 PM
img2.timeinc.net

/obscure?
 
2014-03-09 05:56:55 PM
I still don't understand why Coach's house was the only one to implode, or experience any supernatural activity for that matter.
 
2014-03-09 06:09:47 PM

Shostie: I still don't understand why Coach's house was the only one to implode, or experience any supernatural activity for that matter.


Because he was on welfare and food stamps and nobody helped him!
 
2014-03-09 06:30:06 PM
The rise of 24-hour cable channels has really hurt the poltergeisting industry.
 
2014-03-09 06:31:22 PM

fusillade762: Shostie: I still don't understand why Coach's house was the only one to implode, or experience any supernatural activity for that matter.

Because he was on welfare and food stamps and nobody helped him!


That's exactly what I was thinking!!
 
2014-03-09 06:35:11 PM

Shostie: I still don't understand why Coach's house was the only one to implode, or experience any supernatural activity for that matter.


I always got the impression that his neighbors were having lesser experiences, but not the full Monty.

But the second movie established that the women of the family had a psychic gift, so I think it pretty much boils down to what their house had that none of the others did.

www.piratewench.org
 
2014-03-09 06:35:32 PM
My favorite part about this shiat is that developers keep on building when the subdivisions are way above the price range most people can pay, and so demand for those particular houses is very low.  Ten bucks says they go running to the government with their hands out asking for a bailout.  There are a couple of subdivisions around here that are almost completely empty (under 10% utilization) that have been around for a few years now.
 
2014-03-09 06:35:58 PM

Shostie: I still don't understand why Coach's house was the only one to implode, or experience any supernatural activity for that matter.


Maybe they knew he was in part responsible for it?
 
2014-03-09 06:36:15 PM

calbert: [img2.timeinc.net image 612x380]

/obscure?


ofmusingsandwonderings.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-03-09 06:36:36 PM
BTW, that house in the movie is real and is here: 4267 Roxbury Street, Simi Valley, California
 
2014-03-09 06:37:58 PM
I thought their house got it because they were the ones to find the corpses by digging the pool.
 
2014-03-09 06:38:30 PM

Hrist: My favorite part about this shiat is that developers keep on building when the subdivisions are way above the price range most people can pay, and so demand for those particular houses is very low.  Ten bucks says they go running to the government with their hands out asking for a bailout.  There are a couple of subdivisions around here that are almost completely empty (under 10% utilization) that have been around for a few years now.


Probably a fair bit of quid pro quo happening behind those scenes.
 
2014-03-09 06:40:32 PM
Sleep tight
encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com
 
2014-03-09 06:41:19 PM
I'm ok with supernatural child abduction and attempted tree rape, so long as I get a few fleeting moments of seeing Jo Beth Williams in her panties.

encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com
Bonus: if you screencap and frame the above image, she'll apparently autograph it for you.

img.photobucket.com
 
2014-03-09 06:42:38 PM
Sad that "The Shining" version with Jack Nicholson didn't emphasize that the reason all that shiat was happening in the hotel is because it was built on an Indian burial ground. It wasn't only because a lot of bad stuff happened in the hotel.

lovelace-media.imgix.net
 
2014-03-09 06:43:13 PM
img.fark.net
RIP Little girl (12yo):
Date of Death 1 February 1988 San Diego, California, (cardiopulmonary arrest and intestinal stenosis)
 
2014-03-09 06:43:54 PM

rkiller1: [img.fark.net image 400x301]
RIP Little girl (12yo):
Date of Death 1 February 1988 San Diego, California, (cardiopulmonary arrest and intestinal stenosis)


And the older daughter was murdered.
 
2014-03-09 06:44:12 PM
Bah, just move the headstones and you are good to go.
 
2014-03-09 06:44:20 PM

calbert: [img2.timeinc.net image 612x380]

/obscure?


Obscure? No. Your TV pic and a reply such as "Quasar, works in a drawer" may be obscure.

/born before zip codes
 
2014-03-09 06:45:03 PM
Be cool or be cast out
 
2014-03-09 06:49:17 PM

Shostie: I still don't understand why Coach's house was the only one to implode, or experience any supernatural activity for that matter.


I think the welfare answer is the best, but in the movie itself they say that Carol Anne was born in the house and it's implied that gave her a connection to "the other side."
 
gja [TotalFark]
2014-03-09 06:50:14 PM

texdent: Sleep tight
[encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com image 320x157]


Oh FARK you! I hate those mudderfarking dolls.
 
2014-03-09 06:52:15 PM

Agent Smiths Laugh: rkiller1: [img.fark.net image 400x301]
RIP Little girl (12yo):
Date of Death 1 February 1988 San Diego, California, (cardiopulmonary arrest and intestinal stenosis)

And the older daughter was murdered.


Julien Beck was dying of cancer.
 
2014-03-09 06:53:45 PM
God is in his holy temple.
Earthly thoughts, be silent now,
While with rev'rence we assemble
And before his presence bow.
He is with us, now and ever,
When we call upon his name,
Aiding ev'ry good endeavor,
Guiding ev'ry upward aim.
 
2014-03-09 06:56:29 PM

Agent Smiths Laugh: Hrist: My favorite part about this shiat is that developers keep on building when the subdivisions are way above the price range most people can pay, and so demand for those particular houses is very low.  Ten bucks says they go running to the government with their hands out asking for a bailout.  There are a couple of subdivisions around here that are almost completely empty (under 10% utilization) that have been around for a few years now.

Probably a fair bit of quid pro quo happening behind those scenes.


I live in Round Rock (Austin suburb) and due to people moving to the area there's actually a shortage of housing.  I own several rentals and have had real estate agent contact me to see if anyone is moving out of any of my houses.   Rents and houses are going up at an alarming rate.
 
2014-03-09 06:59:32 PM
From tv tropes:
The scene with the clown nearly choked Oliver Robbins to death but Steven Spielberg saved his life when he realized that something wasn't right during the filming of the scene. The next take had the clown prop not be as tight as before.
 
2014-03-09 07:00:39 PM

AnyName: I live in Round Rock (Austin suburb) and due to people moving to the area there's actually a shortage of housing. I own several rentals and have had real estate agent contact me to see if anyone is moving out of any of my houses. Rents and houses are going up at an alarming rate.


Not sure why this would alarm you?  Does increased revenue frighten you in some way?
 
2014-03-09 07:03:23 PM
Came for reference to this Brady Bunch episode.

Leaving unsatisfied.
 
2014-03-09 07:03:26 PM

Hrist: My favorite part about this shiat is that developers keep on building when the subdivisions are way above the price range most people can pay, and so demand for those particular houses is very low.  Ten bucks says they go running to the government with their hands out asking for a bailout.  There are a couple of subdivisions around here that are almost completely empty (under 10% utilization) that have been around for a few years now.


Being out of the price range is just part of the problem. Another problem is that many of these developments are way out in the boondocks and with the cost of gas most people can't afford the commute, and those that can aren't willing to take that commute anymore.

Interesting story. Back in the 90's i knew a guy who worked for a developer. His job was to market these homes they were building. Back then homes in these developments out in the boonies were flying off the market for the most part. However this developer had a few developments with modestly priced homes, all of the developments this company built had the same basic type of homes, the more expensive ones were a little fancier on the inside and the communities they were built in had more amenities, that they could not sell. The plan they came up with was to raise the price of the homes in the lower priced developments by 25-30%. Once they did that, these homes sold like hotcakes.
 
2014-03-09 07:06:54 PM
I or someone I may or may not know might have been on a construction project in a southern area of Africa. After a few bodies were, theoretically, dug up, delaying progress on the project for a few months, hypothetically, there might have been a standing order to STFU and ignore any other discovered remains. Hypothetically.
 
2014-03-09 07:07:07 PM

rkiller1: Not sure why this would alarm you? Does increased revenue frighten you in some way?


When they shoot up too quickly they tend to come flying down at a later date.  We didn't get hit too bad by the bubble, but there were still lots of people that lost their homes.  I'd rather things creep up slowly and stay there.
 
2014-03-09 07:07:36 PM
I excavated a native American cemetery some time back. This was neat the Sandusky bay and a bunch of summer homes were being built on the cemetery. Skeletons were discovered but only one developer cared (or watched poltiguist) enough to notify the natural history museum. We recovered some small burial gifts but the skeletons were reburied in an undisclosed location. So yea, it happens.
 
2014-03-09 07:20:31 PM
One watchword I heard from anthropologists was that "you didn't find human remains. I don't care what the bone looks like, it isn't human remains". No idea if they were as quick to sweep it under the rug as developers, but the big step in paperwork (enough to pretty much end the dig) was enough to deny any easily deniable remains.
 
2014-03-09 07:21:49 PM

calbert: [img2.timeinc.net image 612x380]

/obscure?


What's that from?
 
2014-03-09 07:25:41 PM

EnderX: calbert: [img2.timeinc.net image 612x380]

/obscure?

[ofmusingsandwonderings.files.wordpress.com image 500x420]


What's that from?
 
2014-03-09 07:27:58 PM
Unfortunately I watched the Poltergeist sequels.

If I recall, coache's  house was built  on the spot where the creepy cultist guy dug a bunker where he and his followers all died in a murder suicide.

The cemetery expanded from there over time.

1st movie is good, and still quite watchable
 
2014-03-09 07:28:52 PM
you big dummy....
 
2014-03-09 07:37:19 PM

skinink: Sad that "The Shining" version with Jack Nicholson didn't emphasize that the reason all that shiat was happening in the hotel is because it was built on an Indian burial ground. It wasn't only because a lot of bad stuff happened in the hotel.

[lovelace-media.imgix.net image 790x444]


That's because that never happened in the book.  In the 'making of' video it's revealed that Kubrick added those parts into the movie to make a statement about America's treatment of Native Americans. That you noticed it shows he was successful.
 
2014-03-09 07:38:29 PM
Considering that people have been on this continent for at least 12,000 years and moved in everywhere as the glaciers retreated, I doubt you could dig anywhere without "disturbing a NA burial ground." Whether there's any visible remains is another story.

It is one of the reasons the whole danged landscape is sacred. Everywhere ever habitable, bang there's someone who died and was buried.

Europeans aren't much different. We call it sacred ground, consecrate it and demand graves never be disturbed. FEMA has to go recover all the bodies every time a flood erodes a cemetary so that the long-deceased can be re-buried (hence why they buy 10s of thousands of body bags at a time).

I used to think that all this was a lot of hoopla over nothing until I realizes that we do it too when it involves people we can identify with more directly. And ultimately it is an exercise in futility because we would eventually have a whole world we can't dig in because we made it into one big necropolis.

On the other hand I knew a guy whose great uncle's grave was dug up by a university because it was a "native burial" and hence at the time not protected by state or federal law. His skeleton and grave goods are still kept by the archaeology dept there because the guy's tribe was disbanded by Congress in the 1880s and so they have no patrimony rights under NAGPRA.

There's got to be a practical, amicable way of dealing with these things besides "protecting all graves forever" and "everything outside of this narrow definition is fair game." Like the lifetime of anyone who knew someone personally. That gives it basically 110 years of protection, and after that maybe we can preserve the monuments in other contexts and have a digital recreation of the original context so that the familial and temporal spatial relationships could still be preserved for later study.

Poltergeist is an interesting piece of pop culture as a gateway for much deeper discussions on a topic many people are very emotionally invested in.
 
2014-03-09 07:43:02 PM
ghostology.com
/sleep tight. tell Jody good night.
 
2014-03-09 07:45:44 PM
NO, we don't want the swimming pool option.
 
2014-03-09 07:59:38 PM

Shostie: I still don't understand why Coach's house was the only one to implode, or experience any supernatural activity for that matter.


Don't know about the implosion but the novel basically said part of it was the classic poltergeist being attached to a single person, in this case the girl and that's why no one else got spookies.
Course whoever wrote the novelization was clearly trippin balls. With the tree sport and bird sport stuff.
 
2014-03-09 08:07:03 PM

rkiller1: AnyName: I live in Round Rock (Austin suburb) and due to people moving to the area there's actually a shortage of housing. I own several rentals and have had real estate agent contact me to see if anyone is moving out of any of my houses. Rents and houses are going up at an alarming rate.

Not sure why this would alarm you?  Does increased revenue frighten you in some way?


The problem is that it actually weakens the community. I remember back in 1998 reading an article in Business Voice, which was a magazine put out by the Las Vegas Chamber of Commerce that had a very foreboding tone warning the Las Vegas Valley about "brain drain". Vegas had a definite technology culture and the cheap housing was attractive in luring many residents. But the concern was that young professionals and current kids and teens who would eventually graduate to become professionals themselves would not be able to put down roots. Roots are key to a city's success. The reason is because you need families that cannot leave due to social ties and monetary debts such as houses. These people stick around and continue working their jobs because they want to keep their homes when economic times go sour. They'll keep working A job somewhere no matter what to retain their property, and the beneficial side effects of this are stabilized real-estate prices, stable tax revenue to government agencies, and a loyal workforce that stays put and develops itself that future companies who want to relocate look for. Which of course diversifies the economy and keeps it ever more stable.

When real estate prices inflated too far ahead of salaries and young workers with no roots had no reason to stay, they didn't. So the burgeoning technology sector in Vegas collapsed. Even when you have a viable tech industry for example such as Silicone Valley, it starts to destroy the local community. Yeah there's money up there in Cupertino, but the community has been destroyed and chased off innovation. Any new innovation doesn't come from around there and has to be imported. Which is why we have Austin as a new source of talent to be mined until it all collapses there too.

The suburbs though get hit worst of all. Recovery for Vegas is still another 10 years away at least, assuming that the bottom in China doesn't fall out resulting in a massive sell-off of real-estate by foreign investors. But places such as North Las Vegas won't recover for another 15-20 while Mesquite, Nevada won't recover for most likely another 20-30 years. When the central real-estate gets too high, people start to move outwards into those suburbs of course, but the problem becomes that construction becomes the biggest industry. Once everything in the central city's economy tanks, the suburbs die off. Like Mesquite: No one stayed behind except unskilled laborers and retirees, neither of which pay enough taxes or have enough disposable income to fuel the local economies. The you simply end up with the exurban ghettoes of Mesquite, North Las Vegas, Palmdale/Lancaster, Hemit, and other countless places. Give it enough time and Round Rock, TX will become nothing more than just another casualty.

So yeah, enjoy that extra revenue surge while you can, because it will come at a helluva cost later on when you go from investment property owner to slum lord fighting for Section 8 tenants.
 
2014-03-09 08:21:23 PM
Calling shenanigans:

s3.amazonaws.com
 
2014-03-09 08:37:40 PM

EnderX: calbert: [img2.timeinc.net image 612x380]

/obscure?

[ofmusingsandwonderings.files.wordpress.com image 500x420]


That is a totally obscure jpeg you used
 
2014-03-09 08:38:15 PM

calbert: [img2.timeinc.net image 612x380]

/obscure?


Ummm, that was the reference in the freakin' headline.
 
2014-03-09 08:46:48 PM

Naritai: skinink: Sad that "The Shining" version with Jack Nicholson didn't emphasize that the reason all that shiat was happening in the hotel is because it was built on an Indian burial ground. It wasn't only because a lot of bad stuff happened in the hotel.

[lovelace-media.imgix.net image 790x444]

That's because that never happened in the book.  In the 'making of' video it's revealed that Kubrick added those parts into the movie to make a statement about America's treatment of Native Americans. That you noticed it shows he was successful.


Dammit. I did read the book and always remembered that I did read it in the book. How I thought that for all these years is confusing.
 
2014-03-09 09:52:11 PM

Trid_Kicker: Came for reference to this Brady Bunch episode.

Leaving unsatisfied.


But you ended up looking for what you came for. So, in retrospect , you got what you came for.. So you should be leaving satisfied.
 
2014-03-10 01:15:33 AM

Old Man Winter: Shostie: I still don't understand why Coach's house was the only one to implode, or experience any supernatural activity for that matter.

Don't know about the implosion but the novel basically said part of it was the classic poltergeist being attached to a single person, in this case the girl and that's why no one else got spookies.
Course whoever wrote the novelization was clearly trippin balls. With the tree sport and bird sport stuff.


So, Stephen King?
 
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