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(Slate)   The latest generation of farmers are apparently all hipsters   (slate.com ) divider line
    More: Unlikely, C.S.A.: The Confederate States of America, farmers  
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5482 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Mar 2014 at 5:52 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-09 07:24:09 PM  

TheShavingofOccam123: DarkSoulNoHope: Did someone read my opinion against Hipster farmers and made a post out of it from the last Hipster thread today? If so good job! I still hope it isn't true and the people doing this farming are honestly doing it because they want to farm and grow their own food and sell it to people who will enjoy it. I would hate to find that a majority of them are doing it as a status symbol and overprice their products for the Hipster market to further overprice their restaurant menus.

One statement I heard on a documentary about coffee was the guy who founded Pete's Coffee (I think it was Pete's). He stated going into the business that they were going to charge more than any competitor for a cup of coffee. And they succeeded with that business plan.


If people really cared about the cost of a cup of coffee, they'd make their own at home.  It's pennies on the dollar compared to the cost at Peet's or Starbucks or anywhere else you'd buy a regular cup of coffee.
 
2014-03-09 07:24:53 PM  
Hunh. Never knew my grandmother who grew almost all her own food was a hipster. And she had enough every year to give away shiattons of canned goods as gifts. And for a lot of that time she did it in her space time as she had a factory job until she was in her 60s. She worked maybe a half acre in two plots.
 
2014-03-09 07:30:23 PM  

Jim_Callahan: TheJonesBoy: How about we call them "gardeners" and everyone lightens up a bit?

Organic gardens are also at terrible, terrible resource black hole, both in financial and environmental terms.

Non-organic gardens actually approach full-scale operations in resource and monetary efficiency with fairly minimal effort for certain resource-intensive crops (notably: tomatoes, carrots) if you're growing in the right climate band, because GMO plants are farkin' awesome.


I "garden" in my back yard, with chemical free blackberries, figs, peppers, lettuce, tomatoes, cantaloupes and herbs. It is a small back yard, but it is very productive. In two years, I plan to move to South Carolina and to put in a half acre fo natural, chemical free crops, most of which I will sell to restaurants (hopefully). I learned how to farm from a video of all things. http://vimeo.com/28055108

And here is a snapshot from September of some of my organic, thornless blackberry plants.

www.freeimagehosting.net
 
2014-03-09 07:34:14 PM  
Look at all these pretentious hipster 20-something douchebags.  Wearing throwback fashions, long beards, and insisting on embracing outdated technologies.

Um, dude, THEY'RE AMISH!
 
2014-03-09 07:38:03 PM  
I live in a hipster farming town in Nebraska. You've probably never heard of it.
 
2014-03-09 07:43:50 PM  

TheShavingofOccam123: DarkSoulNoHope: Did someone read my opinion against Hipster farmers and made a post out of it from the last Hipster thread today? If so good job! I still hope it isn't true and the people doing this farming are honestly doing it because they want to farm and grow their own food and sell it to people who will enjoy it. I would hate to find that a majority of them are doing it as a status symbol and overprice their products for the Hipster market to further overprice their restaurant menus.

One statement I heard on a documentary about coffee was the guy who founded Pete's Coffee (I think it was Pete's). He stated going into the business that they were going to charge more than any competitor for a cup of coffee. And they succeeded with that business plan.


Makes me crazy that they can succeed now with charging more, because to these Hipsters charging less means it isn't a "quality, artisanial" product despite what is the actual quality of the product.

BTW, "Pete's Coffee" reminds me of this rant from Denis Leary.

"Pete's Brew, Pete's Wicked Summer Brew, who the f*ck is 'Pete'?! F*ck Pete!" (I wonder if that's what Denis was talking about, though his rant was against "microbreweries" which Hipsters then later on changed the name to "craft brewery" because they want to pretend they're artists now instead of just selling drink mixes)
 
2014-03-09 07:54:03 PM  

knobmaker: And for all you dimwits who are making fun of young farmers because of their fashion sense, where do you think your food is going to come from in the future?  The average age of farmers in now well over 60.  Robots?  Yeah that's the  ticket.


A few generations ago, plowing a field meant spending a day harnessed to a beast of burden, taking care to make sure neither of you succumbed to heatstroke.

One generation ago, plowing a field meant spending a few hours on an open-air tractor, driving in repetitive patterns and making a mental note to have Doc cut off the latest patch of skin cancer that's shown up.

Today, plowing a field means climbing into an air-conditioned cabin and letting the GPS-controlled autonavigator do its job while you sit back and listen to satellite radio.

Within the next ten years, a farm's entire fleet of tractors will be monitored and supervised in real time by one guy with a smartphone app.
 
2014-03-09 07:59:12 PM  
Some of those people are probably hippies, not hipsters, but it's hard to tell without being able to smell the pictures through my monitor.
 
2014-03-09 08:02:46 PM  
I really have no problem with this. Most liberals' idea of sustainable living is driving their Prius to Whole Foods to buy organic (maybe) food. If people grow their own, then good for them. Those are the people who will survive when society collapses. Well, them and the casts of 'Duck Dynasty' and 'Swamp People.'
 
2014-03-09 08:35:39 PM  
I think it was step 4 on the instructions to a happy life.

Drink over priced coffee.
"That will be 37 dollars."
"That will be 42 dollars."
 
2014-03-09 08:50:43 PM  

alternaloser: It looks as though they each produce 1% of the food they'd need to feed themselves.


Over in 3.   Wait until the trust funds run out.
 
2014-03-09 08:55:28 PM  

Foxxinnia: I live in a hipster farming town in Nebraska. You've probably never heard of it.


Nice : )
 
2014-03-09 09:02:26 PM  

EVERYBODY PANIC: Jim_Callahan: TheJonesBoy: How about we call them "gardeners" and everyone lightens up a bit?

Organic gardens are also at terrible, terrible resource black hole, both in financial and environmental terms.

Non-organic gardens actually approach full-scale operations in resource and monetary efficiency with fairly minimal effort for certain resource-intensive crops (notably: tomatoes, carrots) if you're growing in the right climate band, because GMO plants are farkin' awesome.

I "garden" in my back yard, with chemical free blackberries, figs, peppers, lettuce, tomatoes, cantaloupes and herbs. It is a small back yard, but it is very productive. In two years, I plan to move to South Carolina and to put in a half acre fo natural, chemical free crops, most of which I will sell to restaurants (hopefully). I learned how to farm from a video of all things. http://vimeo.com/28055108

And here is a snapshot from September of some of my organic, thornless blackberry plants.

[www.freeimagehosting.net image 150x112]


Very, my ex and I were doing the urban gardening thing. After I left she converted the part for growing corn to a chicken coup. Granted Nashville made her get rid of the rooster . Oh and she had ducks. W e had built koi ponds in the back yard as well.
 
2014-03-09 09:09:44 PM  
As long as they're growing something successfully, I don't care how they wear their neckbeard-monacle-pabst-plaid-I'veneverheardof.
 
2014-03-09 09:11:16 PM  

MemeSlave: alternaloser: It looks as though they each produce 1% of the food they'd need to feed themselves.

Over in 3.   Wait until the trust funds run out.


pfft.   buy your corn and wheat.   You can't buy a lot with 1.5 acres and tend it ?  apart from truly impacted urban zones, it is entirely manageable. Apart from the truly industrialized crops (corn, wheat, beef) all it takes is an acre or two to abandon the the supermarket.  You still need at least one income earner to keep the lights on and natural gas on and pay the property taxes.

Northern zones with a short season and dry zones with limited water are more difficult.
 
2014-03-09 09:19:22 PM  

knobmaker:  where do you think your food is going to come from in the future?    Robots?  Yeah that's the  ticket.


I fully expect that to be the next step, considering how incredibly industrialized the American farming industry has become.  In fact, I was honestly surprised to find they aren't in very widespread use just yet:

imgs.ntd.tv
 
2014-03-09 09:38:30 PM  
They look like the people at our farmer's market. For the last 25 years.
 
2014-03-09 09:54:20 PM  
I think I'm becoming a plant hoarder. I'm running out of room on the back porch for herbs and veggies that are already growing nicely and I keep buying more and more plants every time I see them at a market. I'm gonna see if I can bribe the landlord to let me turn up that worthless lawn in the back that he's letting go to hell, and get some real crops going there. The weather here is perfect for growing almost anything.
 
2014-03-09 10:29:58 PM  

knobmaker: And for all you dimwits who are making fun of young farmers because of their fashion sense, where do you think your food is going to come from in the future?  The average age of farmers in now well over 60.  Robots? Yeah that's the  ticket.


gadgets.boingboing.net
 
2014-03-09 11:07:39 PM  
Have over an acre here on the edge of the prairie.  Makes no sense to grow corn or tomatoes - can't get any cheaper than at the local market.  I waste my time on higher-margin items, like berries, cherries, peaches, lettuces and cascade hops.

Well, when there are no jobs, or your jobs don't pay enough to live, you get farming.

Farming is hard.  I know. I grew up farming.  We went broke. Thankfully by then the town nearby was a lot bigger and they wanted our land for houses.  That's my parent's pension now.

no degree needed, don't have to speak English, just have to work 12 hours a day and kiss your weekends goodbye if you want to earn a living.

Young people aren't "discovering" farming.  They have almost no options anymore.  I grow to supplement our diet but I know how much bigger and harder it would be for me to quit my day job and try to live like that.  no thanks.


dbaggins Johnson is right!  Lots of people I know start tilling the back yard to try to save a few bucks or improve their diet.  The raising chickens thing, tho...
 
2014-03-09 11:33:08 PM  

rkiller1: You know you would.
[img.fark.net image 278x287]
And I don't mean the chicken...or do I?


Likes the Cock...

/the Chicken does
//OK she does too...
 
2014-03-10 12:51:40 AM  
I think it's really cool what they're doing, but they aren't farmers. They're gardeners.
 
2014-03-10 01:16:57 AM  

Boo_Guy: /I'm be on the roof with my free range honey bees if anyone needs me


Aren't honey bees pretty much "free range" by their very nature?
 
2014-03-10 01:27:01 AM  

Dwight_Yeast: Boo_Guy: /I'm be on the roof with my free range honey bees if anyone needs me

Aren't honey bees pretty much "free range" by their very nature?


They're usually kept in giant barns under very poor conditions.
 
2014-03-10 06:40:59 AM  

Boo_Guy: Why do people keep writing articles about every little things hipsters get into?

Everyone hates hipsters,  so why would you want to hear about them?

/I'm be on the roof with my free range honey bees if anyone needs me


Free range honey bees are our last hope!!
 
2014-03-10 08:31:47 AM  
Considering bees forage a 6 to 8 mile radius from the hive, the chances of honey being truly organic, east of the Rockies, is about nil, nada, zero, zip. Anyone who tells you different is either really stupid or lying.

On the other hand probably 99.999% of all maple syrup is, and always has been "organic". It's sap harvested from wild trees out in the woods. No spraying or fertilizer necessary, ever. The only possibility that it might not be organic, is if the sap was collected from trees in the city, that might be growing in lawns that might have been sprayed or fertilized.
 
2014-03-10 01:34:51 PM  

Pick: Considering bees forage a 6 to 8 mile radius from the hive, the chances of honey being truly organic, east of the Rockies, is about nil, nada, zero, zip. Anyone who tells you different is either really stupid or lying.

On the other hand probably 99.999% of all maple syrup is, and always has been "organic". It's sap harvested from wild trees out in the woods. No spraying or fertilizer necessary, ever. The only possibility that it might not be organic, is if the sap was collected from trees in the city, that might be growing in lawns that might have been sprayed or fertilized.


Our library had a book on sugarmaking, so I read it out of curiosity.

Most syrup stops being organic when they add a surfectant to stop the bubbles from forming when they're boiling. They can use a lot of organic vegetable oil or a tiny amount of an industrial and safe bubble-stopper and most choose the latter.

So the source material is exactly as you said - organic - but the processing usually screws up the certification.
 
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