Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(News.com.au)   So, how old is the plane you're flying in? Are you sure you really want to know? Just have another drink and forget about it   (news.com.au ) divider line
    More: Scary, national carrier  
•       •       •

2423 clicks; posted to Business » on 09 Mar 2014 at 3:28 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



73 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2014-03-08 10:22:26 PM  
When they start the engines and somebody yells: "Contact," it's old.
 
2014-03-08 10:59:11 PM  
About 70 years old.
www.warbirdalley.com
 
2014-03-08 11:09:02 PM  

teto85: About 70 years old.
[www.warbirdalley.com image 550x367]


sweet
 
2014-03-09 12:00:07 AM  
The military still flies B-52s built in the 50s.  As long as the planes are well maintained I don't see the issue.
 
2014-03-09 01:15:07 AM  
I'd trust some older Aircraft that's well maintained better than some modern computerized 'fly by wire' stuff that uses a Window OS.
 
2014-03-09 01:35:49 AM  
The missing Malaysian plane was fairly new according to media reports
 
2014-03-09 03:24:36 AM  
And yet commercial air travel is still the by-far safest way to go.

Despite the whole "ooga-booga corporations" attitude that's so pervasive these days. Air carriers understand that a single plane crash will destroy their near-term future, and in this market, probably sink the airline as a whole.
 
2014-03-09 03:36:28 AM  

optikeye: I'd trust some older Aircraft that's well maintained better than some modern computerized 'fly by wire' stuff that uses a Window OS.


I was with you until the Windows comment.  You do realize that Windows isn't actually used in anywhere in the sky don't you?
 
2014-03-09 03:42:36 AM  

teto85: About 70 years old.
[www.warbirdalley.com image 550x367]


Starts don't match the stripes.
 
2014-03-09 03:43:34 AM  
Well, according to Airfare Watchdog the skies are full of old clunkers including Boeing 717s...

Either the article's author is an idiot, or the author is trying to take advantage of the out of order Boeing numbering sequence to incite fear.  The oldest 717 is barely over 15 years old and the youngest is five years old.  Hardly old by any stretch of the imagination when it comes to jetliners.

Ah yeah, as others have indicated, there's nothing wrong with a properly maintained, old plane.  I've been on plenty of 30 year old jetliners flown by reputable airlines where I felt safer than I did on planes half that age flown by questionable ones.  And I feel safer in both those scenarios than I ever felt when my grandmother got behind the wheel.

/is this the Country Kitchen Buffet?
 
2014-03-09 03:47:23 AM  

teto85: About 70 years old.
[www.warbirdalley.com image 550x367]


How tear-inducing.  Look at how they mutilated that once-beautiful plane by amputating much of the wings.
 
2014-03-09 03:52:13 AM  
Really? They point people to a plane spotter site.

http://registry.faa.gov/aircraftinquiry/nnum_inquiry.aspx

It's the certs for all the N-numbered aircraft.
 
2014-03-09 03:57:10 AM  

Radak: I've been on plenty of 30 year old jetliners flown by reputable airlines where I felt safer than I did on planes half that age flown by questionable ones.


Agreed. I think I might be concerned with flying in a Fokker aircraft, now that Fokker (bought out of bankruptcy twice, I think) won't offer maintenance on their planes built before 1996 because the airlines that own them are too far away from the company's headquarters.
 
2014-03-09 04:02:11 AM  
These are funny...

• The flight attendant call button symbol is wearing a skirt or is labelled stewardess.
• There's still an ashtray on your seat's arm rest and in the bathrooms.


Interiors are modular.  There's nothing to prevent an airline putting a 30 year old module in a five year old plane.  And yes, a few carriers (nobody big) still allow smoking, so there is still some market for modules equipped with ashtrays.

• There's a stairway to the outside in the tail of the plane.

The MD-90 has airstairs in the tail, and could be as young as 14 years old.  So does the Yak-42, which could be only 12 years old.

• You'll find a no-smoking sign above the seats instead of a 'turn off electronics' symbol.

What exactly does this author consider old?

• Your entertainment screens drop from the ceiling.

This was my favorite, and proof that the author must frequent people's lawns.  I wonder how he would react to seeing a huge old three-gun CRT projector for his inflight entertainment.  And the headphones that were just rubber tubes.  Ah, the halcyon days of the L-1011.  I miss you.  But not the smoking sections.
 
2014-03-09 06:00:57 AM  

Radak: Well, according to Airfare Watchdog the skies are full of old clunkers including Boeing 717s...

Either the article's author is an idiot, or the author is trying to take advantage of the out of order Boeing numbering sequence to incite fear.  The oldest 717 is barely over 15 years old and the youngest is five years old.  Hardly old by any stretch of the imagination when it comes to jetliners.


The 717 also has zero hull losses and zero fatalities to date, even though a bunch are in inter-island service in Hawaii, where doing 5 takeoffs and landings in a single day ("high cycles") isn't unheard of.  Of course, Hawaiian Airlines  as a whole has zero hull losses and zero fatalities since 1929, and they've flown planes from Airbus, Bellanca, Beechcraft, Boeing, Convair, de Havilland Canada, Douglas, Lockheed, McDonnell Douglas, Nihon Aircraft Manufacturing Corporation, Shorts, Sikorsky, and Vickers.
 
2014-03-09 06:01:19 AM  
Just try flying American Airlines out of St. Louis: they still have a number of McDonnell-Douglas MD90s.

Nothing worse than sitting down, looking at the sun shade handle and it says McDonnell Douglas. Then as you taxi from the gate and take off its a wonderful combination of creaks, groans and rattles.
 
2014-03-09 06:54:27 AM  
As someone who develops aircraft inspection technologies, I'm getting a kick.
 
2014-03-09 07:04:58 AM  

Fubini: And yet commercial air travel is still the by-far safest way to go.

Despite the whole "ooga-booga corporations" attitude that's so pervasive these days. Air carriers understand that a single plane crash will destroy their near-term future, and in this market, probably sink the airline as a whole.


FAA wasn't involved at all, huh? All just free-market stuff, huh?
 
2014-03-09 07:08:23 AM  
I don't care how many years a plane has existed. i care how many takeoffs and landings it's had. Planes used on short hops can end up with several times as many as planes used on longer routes. And it's the takeoffs and landings - I.E. - the number of pressurizations and depressurizations - that give you the real working age of a plane.
 
2014-03-09 07:23:35 AM  
I know exactly how old my 1976 Cessna Skyhawk II is.
 
2014-03-09 07:27:53 AM  

optikeye: I'd trust some older Aircraft that's well maintained better than some modern computerized 'fly by wire' stuff that uses a Window OS.


f3.thejournal.ie
 
2014-03-09 08:55:24 AM  
I'd feel much better flying in a new Boeing 787.
 
2014-03-09 09:04:02 AM  
The thing about old planes is that people generally know what fails on them and how not to fly them so they crash.

New airplanes are more likely to fail in a way unforeseen by designers and testers.
 
2014-03-09 09:07:03 AM  

Fubini: And yet commercial air travel is still the by-far safest way to go.

Despite the whole "ooga-booga corporations" attitude that's so pervasive these days. Air carriers understand that a single plane crash will destroy their near-term future, and in this market, probably sink the airline as a whole.


Until they all merge into one major airline and you are left with no choice but to ride their deathtraps.
 
2014-03-09 10:04:21 AM  
also known as the N-number on US planes
This sounds racist

I was recently on a plane that had ashtrays. I actually thought to myself "How farking old is this plane?", but then the Valium kicked in and I fell asleep. Of course, the carpet paneling on the wall was also peeling away, so I'm sure that plane was well maintained. Appearances are everything.
/Allegiant sucks
//once and never again
 
2014-03-09 10:32:25 AM  
From what I recall, the age of planes can be attributed to the safety engineering. It takes years and years to implement a lot of the safety features in modern aircraft, so manufacturers can't just whip up a new fancy plane in a year and expect it to get the FAA greenlight.

/dnrtfa
 
2014-03-09 10:39:51 AM  
Who the hell was writing this?  Like Radak said, the 717 isn't that old, even if it's effectively a warmed-up DC-9 (and there's absolutely nothing wrong with that).  Unless you're a FedEx package pilot or flying charters from Belarus or North Korea (the Tu-154) the chances you're going to get in a 3-engine plane today is zero.
 
2014-03-09 10:40:22 AM  
Radak

Ditto the comment on the "El Ten"  best aircraft ever.

/racked up 150K miles with EAL cruising Latin America & the Caribbean on business in the '80's

last commercial aircraft that required a flight Engineer.

Understand there are only 2 active in the USA  http://www.airliners.net/aviation-forums/general_aviation/read.main/4 5 05936/
 
2014-03-09 10:41:04 AM  
 
2014-03-09 10:45:12 AM  

Lawnchair: Who the hell was writing this?  Like Radak said, the 717 isn't that old, even if it's effectively a warmed-up DC-9 (and there's absolutely nothing wrong with that).  Unless you're a FedEx package pilot or flying charters from Belarus or North Korea (the Tu-154) the chances you're going to get in a 3-engine plane today is zero.


What about my brand new Falcon 900?

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-03-09 10:47:18 AM  

Lawnchair: Unless you're a FedEx package pilot or flying charters from Belarus or North Korea (the Tu-154) the chances you're going to get in a 3-engine plane today is zero.


There are a few other exceptions...

i.imgur.com

At least it doesn't have ashtrays.
 
2014-03-09 10:50:36 AM  

Lawnchair: Who the hell was writing this?  Like Radak said, the 717 isn't that old, even if it's effectively a warmed-up DC-9 (and there's absolutely nothing wrong with that).  Unless you're a FedEx package pilot or flying charters from Belarus or North Korea (the Tu-154) the chances you're going to get in a 3-engine plane today is zero.


Is there anything inherently wrong with 3-jet planes?  Has the move away from them just been because advances in engine technology make it cheaper to build 2-jet planes?
 
2014-03-09 10:56:24 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: Lawnchair: Who the hell was writing this?  Like Radak said, the 717 isn't that old, even if it's effectively a warmed-up DC-9 (and there's absolutely nothing wrong with that).  Unless you're a FedEx package pilot or flying charters from Belarus or North Korea (the Tu-154) the chances you're going to get in a 3-engine plane today is zero.

Is there anything inherently wrong with 3-jet planes?  Has the move away from them just been because advances in engine technology make it cheaper to build 2-jet planes?


Cost and reliability. Regulation used to ban twin engined planes from long flights over water due to safety concerns. Since they now allow that twins have become more popular because they are cheaper to buy and run.
 
2014-03-09 11:07:05 AM  

Lawnchair: Who the hell was writing this?  Like Radak said, the 717 isn't that old, even if it's effectively a warmed-up DC-9 (and there's absolutely nothing wrong with that).  Unless you're a FedEx package pilot or flying charters from Belarus or North Korea (the Tu-154) the chances you're going to get in a 3-engine plane today is zero.


I think there are some airlines still flying the Lockheed L-1011.
 
2014-03-09 11:08:22 AM  

optikeye: I'd trust some older Aircraft that's well maintained better than some modern computerized 'fly by wire' stuff that uses a Window OS.


That puts a whole different spin on the "blue screen of death".
 
2014-03-09 11:14:11 AM  

Cybernetic: optikeye: I'd trust some older Aircraft that's well maintained better than some modern computerized 'fly by wire' stuff that uses a Window OS.

That puts a whole different spin on the "blue screen of death".


That's why Windows 8 is so good. You can reboot it so much faster, hopefully before you hit the ground.
 
2014-03-09 11:15:54 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: Lawnchair: Who the hell was writing this?  Like Radak said, the 717 isn't that old, even if it's effectively a warmed-up DC-9 (and there's absolutely nothing wrong with that).  Unless you're a FedEx package pilot or flying charters from Belarus or North Korea (the Tu-154) the chances you're going to get in a 3-engine plane today is zero.

Is there anything inherently wrong with 3-jet planes?  Has the move away from them just been because advances in engine technology make it cheaper to build 2-jet planes?


Fewer engines is always cheaper.  The third engine was always biatchier to work on.  Partially just being higher in the air (or crazy-ducted).  Partially because you were always dealing with the tail one way or the other.  Once ETOPS was relaxed (the rules about how far you can be from an airfield with what level of redundancy) they didn't really add up.

The DC-10/MD-11 (and 727s until recently) have worked out well for FedEx, thrust-for-capacity-wise.  But, even then, they've acquired most of the running fleet of them mostly because they were relatively-cheap in the used market.
 
2014-03-09 11:28:40 AM  
FedEx just recently retired its Boeing 727s - LOUD SOBs - and the USAF's KC-10s (a tanker/cargo version of the DC-10) are still going strong after 33 years, without a single major flying accident (IIRC one was lost early 90s in a ground accident while under repair).  The key is maintenance, maintenance, and maintenance.
 
2014-03-09 11:42:59 AM  
It's all about the maintenance. Every 10-12 years for most aircraft, they undergo heavy check where the plane is basically taken apart and everything is inspected for fatigue, time limited parts are replaced, and the whole thing is put back together. As long as the plane hasn't hit it's hard limit on cycles (which for some planes, including the MD-80, is around 110,000) and it checks out during the maintenance checks, there's no real reason to scrap it, especially if it ls already paid for.
 
2014-03-09 11:52:50 AM  

Radak: And yes, a few carriers (nobody big) still allow smoking, so there is still some market for modules equipped with ashtrays.


And nobody in the US. Smoking has been banned on all US domestic carriers since the late '90s.
 
2014-03-09 12:29:06 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: The military still flies B-52s built in the 50s.  As long as the planes are well maintained I don't see the issue.


That's the thing - the military's maintenance operations aren't expected to turn a profit.
 
2014-03-09 12:34:12 PM  
Or, you can look at the nameplate in the doorframe as you get on the plane.
 
2014-03-09 01:51:42 PM  

CraicBaby: Radak: And yes, a few carriers (nobody big) still allow smoking, so there is still some market for modules equipped with ashtrays.

And nobody in the US. Smoking has been banned on all US domestic carriers since the late '90s.


Ashtrays are legally required in the lavs. There is enough of a problem with people still smoking in there even though it's illegal that they have the ashtrays so they don't freak out and toss the lit butt in the trash, setting the whole damn thing on fire.
 
2014-03-09 02:17:55 PM  
The Boeing aircraft that I crewed and was responsible for was a mere three years younger than I. It is now 50 years old, and still serving in Afghanistan. I have no idea if this is it, but it very well could be:

padresteve.files.wordpress.com

When I crewed it, it had over 8,000 airframe hours, and was a pockmarked Viet Nam veteran. By now, I'd bet the airframe hours have either doubled or tripled, and it's now a veteran of two wars. Would I fly on it again? In a heartbeat.
 
2014-03-09 02:18:54 PM  
Oh, you mean a $100+ M commercial aircraft isn't designed for a 1-year lifespan like the latest piece of iGarbage?! This is an outrage, America demands engineered obsolescence in our products so that we have an excuse to go out and sate our consumer urges.
 
2014-03-09 02:52:45 PM  

dbirchall: Radak: Well, according to Airfare Watchdog the skies are full of old clunkers including Boeing 717s...

Either the article's author is an idiot, or the author is trying to take advantage of the out of order Boeing numbering sequence to incite fear.  The oldest 717 is barely over 15 years old and the youngest is five years old.  Hardly old by any stretch of the imagination when it comes to jetliners.

The 717 also has zero hull losses and zero fatalities to date, even though a bunch are in inter-island service in Hawaii, where doing 5 takeoffs and landings in a single day ("high cycles") isn't unheard of.  Of course, Hawaiian Airlines  as a whole has zero hull losses and zero fatalities since 1929, and they've flown planes from Airbus, Bellanca, Beechcraft, Boeing, Convair, de Havilland Canada, Douglas, Lockheed, McDonnell Douglas, Nihon Aircraft Manufacturing Corporation, Shorts, Sikorsky, and Vickers.


the.honoluluadvertiser.com
 
2014-03-09 02:59:49 PM  
@ TedCruz'sCrazyDad: My sister flew on that very aircraft a week before before that image was taken. They were involved in a hard landing on arrival in Honolulu that popped all the overhead bins open, dumping luggage and gear upon everyone's heads. She said that there were visible popped rivets on the exterior of the aircraft, upon exiting. She said it was the worst landing she'd ever been in.
 
2014-03-09 03:10:14 PM  

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: [the.honoluluadvertiser.com image 598x280]


FWIW, that was Aloha Airlines, not Hawaiian Airlines.  That incident was, however, the result of the very frequent, short flights dbirchall was describing.
 
2014-03-09 03:11:19 PM  

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: dbirchall: Radak: Well, according to Airfare Watchdog the skies are full of old clunkers including Boeing 717s...

Either the article's author is an idiot, or the author is trying to take advantage of the out of order Boeing numbering sequence to incite fear.  The oldest 717 is barely over 15 years old and the youngest is five years old.  Hardly old by any stretch of the imagination when it comes to jetliners.

The 717 also has zero hull losses and zero fatalities to date, even though a bunch are in inter-island service in Hawaii, where doing 5 takeoffs and landings in a single day ("high cycles") isn't unheard of.  Of course, Hawaiian Airlines  as a whole has zero hull losses and zero fatalities since 1929, and they've flown planes from Airbus, Bellanca, Beechcraft, Boeing, Convair, de Havilland Canada, Douglas, Lockheed, McDonnell Douglas, Nihon Aircraft Manufacturing Corporation, Shorts, Sikorsky, and Vickers.

[the.honoluluadvertiser.com image 598x280]


Your photo response makes no sense. That is a Boeing 737 (not 717) that was operated by Aloha Airlines (not Hawaiian).
 
2014-03-09 04:27:30 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: The military still flies B-52s built in the 50s. As long as the planes are well maintained I don't see the issue.


THIS.   IIRC there was a story a few years back about an AF pilot who got assigned to pilot the same BUFF his father flew.

Although, as frequently as aircraft are maintained, it's really only the "same" aircraft in the "my grandfather's axe" sense of the word.
 
Displayed 50 of 73 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter








In Other Media
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report