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(Sky.com)   Want to see the asteroid as big as three double-decker buses whizzing past the Earth? Look no further than this video to see how close   (news.sky.com) divider line 39
    More: Scary, Earth, asteroids  
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4194 clicks; posted to Geek » on 06 Mar 2014 at 3:36 PM (20 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



39 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-03-06 02:11:28 PM
Within the distance of the moon? I don't think we'd have to wake up Bruce Willis or Morgan Freeeman.
 
2014-03-06 03:43:49 PM
Meh, it's not THAT much closer than the Moon, and it's nowhere near as big.

Calm the fark down, people, this isn't an increase in asteroids, just an increase in our ability to detect them.
 
2014-03-06 03:52:34 PM
awesome name or unfortunate name: Peter Birtwhistle
 
2014-03-06 03:52:39 PM
How many refrigerators is that? How many times would it fit on a football field, college to be specific?
 
2014-03-06 03:54:55 PM

Mikey1969: Meh, it's not THAT much closer than the Moon, and it's nowhere near as big.

Calm the fark down, people, this isn't an increase in asteroids, just an increase in our ability to detect them.


LIES! We here at the Asteroid Insurance Company, LLC have conducted studies that proved conclusively that there is likely to be an increase in asteroids of up to 45% between now and this time six and a half years from now.

Get your policy quote today! 1-888-ASTEROID
 
2014-03-06 03:59:35 PM
"Was detected four days ago".

Bloody hell. Still, "three buses" is pretty small as asteroids go, isn't it? Would that make it to the surface with enough energy to do some damage?  *looks it up* It'd cause a 1 MT airburst at 49,000 ft, and "large fragments may strike the surface".
 
2014-03-06 04:01:36 PM

God-is-a-Taco: How many refrigerators is that? How many times would it fit on a football field, college to be specific?


0.01 Rhode Islands.
 
2014-03-06 04:02:49 PM

JayCab: "Was detected four days ago".

Bloody hell. Still, "three buses" is pretty small as asteroids go, isn't it? Would that make it to the surface with enough energy to do some damage?  *looks it up* It'd cause a 1 MT airburst at 49,000 ft, and "large fragments may strike the surface".


Or Evel Kenevel will jump it on his motorcycle.
 
2014-03-06 04:05:13 PM

JayCab: "Was detected four days ago".

Bloody hell. Still, "three buses" is pretty small as asteroids go, isn't it? Would that make it to the surface with enough energy to do some damage?  *looks it up* It'd cause a 1 MT airburst at 49,000 ft, and "large fragments may strike the surface".


Keep in mind that the object that did this:
www.meteorcrater.com

Was about 150 ft long.

We still don't need to get all Chicken Little over this shiat.
 
2014-03-06 04:07:51 PM
"two more that will be even closer discovered just this mornin [endvideo]"

wut?
 
2014-03-06 04:19:29 PM
In some respects, I wouldn't mind something of this size, preferably made of iron, to plow into someplace uninhabited or otherwise desolate, but close enough to civilization to leave an impression strong enough to reboot space exploration.

Say, Cleveland.
 
2014-03-06 04:20:58 PM

Mikey1969: Meh, it's not THAT much closer than the Moon, and it's nowhere near as big.

Calm the fark down, people, this isn't an increase in asteroids, just an increase in our ability to detect them.


Indeed... but it should be alarming that were detecting some significantly sized ones which are making relatively close passes just days before they arrive. Then there's the one that blew up over Russia last year that no one saw coming... and the one over Brazil... and etc..

So sure it's not like there are any more asteroids out there.... it's just that we don't actually know what is out there. There very well could be one with some city's name on it (so to speak) and we just don't know about it yet. That should trouble us since we could actually do something about it.
 
2014-03-06 04:39:53 PM

Valiente: In some respects, I wouldn't mind something of this size, preferably made of iron, to plow into someplace uninhabited or otherwise desolate, but close enough to civilization to leave an impression strong enough to reboot space exploration.

Say, Cleveland.


Now now...we wouldn't want people to get the impression that asteroids impacts were a good thing, would we?
 
2014-03-06 04:45:07 PM

Valiente: In some respects, I wouldn't mind something of this size, preferably made of iron, to plow into someplace uninhabited or otherwise desolate, but close enough to civilization to leave an impression strong enough to reboot space exploration.

Say, Cleveland.


In "Rendezvous with Rama" by Clark a meteorite hit in Northern Italy on 9/11/2077 and that is what prompted building the early warning network that first discovered the spacecraft.
 
2014-03-06 04:47:30 PM

jaggspb: awesome name or unfortunate name: Peter Birtwhistle


Better name: Hugh Jassteroid
 
2014-03-06 04:54:09 PM
swing and a miss....
 
2014-03-06 04:54:51 PM

mongbiohazard: Mikey1969: Meh, it's not THAT much closer than the Moon, and it's nowhere near as big.

Calm the fark down, people, this isn't an increase in asteroids, just an increase in our ability to detect them.

Indeed... but it should be alarming that were detecting some significantly sized ones which are making relatively close passes just days before they arrive. Then there's the one that blew up over Russia last year that no one saw coming... and the one over Brazil... and etc..

So sure it's not like there are any more asteroids out there.... it's just that we don't actually know what is out there. There very well could be one with some city's name on it (so to speak) and we just don't know about it yet. That should trouble us since we could actually do something about it.


There is a LOT of stuff out there, 100 feet is minuscule compared to the sizes and speeds we're talking about. I'm impressed that we're finding this many. Although if we find many more, the Doom and Gloom crowd is gonna have a field day over gay marriage.

Hell, there's already a new one since this story, only about 33 feet across, but something like 65,000 miles. They're gonna wait till we've found one for each state that's recognized gay marriage and present it as a big as 'Gotcha' boquet, I bet...
 
2014-03-06 05:03:55 PM
In science, the correct unit of measure for large objects is elephants, not buses.
 
2014-03-06 05:17:14 PM
Want to see the asteroid as big as three double-decker buses whizzing past the Earth? Look no further than this video to see how close nothing
 
2014-03-06 05:29:55 PM

Mikey1969: JayCab: "Was detected four days ago".

Bloody hell. Still, "three buses" is pretty small as asteroids go, isn't it? Would that make it to the surface with enough energy to do some damage?  *looks it up* It'd cause a 1 MT airburst at 49,000 ft, and "large fragments may strike the surface".

Keep in mind that the object that did this:
[www.meteorcrater.com image 720x480]

Was about 150 ft long.

We still don't need to get all Chicken Little over this shiat.


I hope we do. Anything that gets people paying attention to space and realising the need to increase funding for research for all things extra-terrestrial is a good thing. It will have knock on effects in other branches of astronomy as well. Let the good times roll, under a cloud of panic.
 
2014-03-06 05:46:03 PM

Slaxl: Mikey1969: JayCab: "Was detected four days ago".

Bloody hell. Still, "three buses" is pretty small as asteroids go, isn't it? Would that make it to the surface with enough energy to do some damage?  *looks it up* It'd cause a 1 MT airburst at 49,000 ft, and "large fragments may strike the surface".

Keep in mind that the object that did this:
[www.meteorcrater.com image 720x480]

Was about 150 ft long.

We still don't need to get all Chicken Little over this shiat.

I hope we do. Anything that gets people paying attention to space and realising the need to increase funding for research for all things extra-terrestrial is a good thing. It will have knock on effects in other branches of astronomy as well. Let the good times roll, under a cloud of panic.


Can you imagine the amount of funding an early warning meteorite system would get if that meteorite had hit in the US rather than Russia?
 
2014-03-06 05:55:34 PM

Mikey1969: this isn't an increase in asteroids, just an increase in our ability to detect them.


Been wondering about that.
 
2014-03-06 06:19:04 PM

Zul the Magnificent: Mikey1969: this isn't an increase in asteroids, just an increase in our ability to detect them.

Been wondering about that.


When I took Astronomy back on '02 or so, the instructor talked about just how much stuff misses us on a regular basis and how much other stuff just happens to land in the empty, unoccupied corners of the globe.

It almost scares you into sterility.
 
2014-03-06 06:26:29 PM
Wow! It's a pink asteroid!

You know what that means
 
2014-03-06 06:28:59 PM

Jeng: Slaxl: Mikey1969: JayCab: "Was detected four days ago".

Bloody hell. Still, "three buses" is pretty small as asteroids go, isn't it? Would that make it to the surface with enough energy to do some damage?  *looks it up* It'd cause a 1 MT airburst at 49,000 ft, and "large fragments may strike the surface".

Keep in mind that the object that did this:
[www.meteorcrater.com image 720x480]

Was about 150 ft long.

We still don't need to get all Chicken Little over this shiat.

I hope we do. Anything that gets people paying attention to space and realising the need to increase funding for research for all things extra-terrestrial is a good thing. It will have knock on effects in other branches of astronomy as well. Let the good times roll, under a cloud of panic.

Can you imagine the amount of funding an early warning meteorite system would get if that meteorite had hit in the US rather than Russia?


This smacks of "science" and would never get past the teatard brigade. They're taxed enough already, donchaknow.
 
2014-03-06 06:35:07 PM
Great. I may never sleep again. Fark you subby. FARK YOU!
 
2014-03-06 06:55:27 PM

SewerSquirrels: Valiente: In some respects, I wouldn't mind something of this size, preferably made of iron, to plow into someplace uninhabited or otherwise desolate, but close enough to civilization to leave an impression strong enough to reboot space exploration.

Say, Cleveland.

Now now...we wouldn't want people to get the impression that asteroids impacts were a good thing, would we?


Ever heard of "a cleansing fire"?

jmstevenson.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-03-06 06:56:50 PM

Jeng: Valiente: In some respects, I wouldn't mind something of this size, preferably made of iron, to plow into someplace uninhabited or otherwise desolate, but close enough to civilization to leave an impression strong enough to reboot space exploration.

Say, Cleveland.

In "Rendezvous with Rama" by Clark a meteorite hit in Northern Italy on 9/11/2077 and that is what prompted building the early warning network that first discovered the spacecraft.


I fear the late Clarke will be right with his predictions here as well, meaning I won't live to see a resumption of manned space travel.
 
2014-03-06 07:07:03 PM

Mikey1969: Calm the fark down, people, this isn't an increase in asteroids, just an increase in our ability to detect them


And detect them we have.
 
2014-03-06 08:16:21 PM

Mikey1969: JayCab: "Was detected four days ago".

Bloody hell. Still, "three buses" is pretty small as asteroids go, isn't it? Would that make it to the surface with enough energy to do some damage?  *looks it up* It'd cause a 1 MT airburst at 49,000 ft, and "large fragments may strike the surface".

Keep in mind that the object that did this:
[www.meteorcrater.com image 720x480]

Was about 150 ft long.

We still don't need to get all Chicken Little over this shiat.


True, but overlay that crater with any major city to see what could happen.  Or an ocean strike in shallow, coastal waters near a large port city...
 
2014-03-06 08:17:08 PM
According to Purdue Impact Earth, using the data given in the article: 30m diameter, 50,000 kph (~ 14 km/s)

And assuming an iron meteorite, with a 45 degree impact angle onto sedimentary rock:

You'd see an impact with the force of 2.65 Megatons of TNT, leaving a crater 2500 feet wide and 500 feet deep.
 
2014-03-06 08:23:16 PM

RatMaster999: Mikey1969: JayCab: "Was detected four days ago".

Bloody hell. Still, "three buses" is pretty small as asteroids go, isn't it? Would that make it to the surface with enough energy to do some damage?  *looks it up* It'd cause a 1 MT airburst at 49,000 ft, and "large fragments may strike the surface".

Keep in mind that the object that did this:
[www.meteorcrater.com image 720x480]

Was about 150 ft long.

We still don't need to get all Chicken Little over this shiat.

True, but overlay that crater with any major city to see what could happen.  Or an ocean strike in shallow, coastal waters near a large port city...


The percentage of populated area on the earth is actually pretty low(compared to what most people think) though. I can't remember exactly what it is. Especially when you add in the oceans.
 
2014-03-06 09:53:57 PM

Evil High Priest: Jeng: Slaxl: Mikey1969: JayCab: "Was detected four days ago".

Bloody hell. Still, "three buses" is pretty small as asteroids go, isn't it? Would that make it to the surface with enough energy to do some damage?  *looks it up* It'd cause a 1 MT airburst at 49,000 ft, and "large fragments may strike the surface".

Keep in mind that the object that did this:
[www.meteorcrater.com image 720x480]

Was about 150 ft long.

We still don't need to get all Chicken Little over this shiat.

I hope we do. Anything that gets people paying attention to space and realising the need to increase funding for research for all things extra-terrestrial is a good thing. It will have knock on effects in other branches of astronomy as well. Let the good times roll, under a cloud of panic.

Can you imagine the amount of funding an early warning meteorite system would get if that meteorite had hit in the US rather than Russia?

This smacks of "science" and would never get past the teatard brigade. They're taxed enough already, donchaknow.


What a retarded comment this is.
 
2014-03-06 10:11:29 PM
What a retarded comment this is.

Forget it, Jake, this is Fark....
 
2014-03-06 10:13:55 PM

Slaxl: Mikey1969:

We still don't need to get all Chicken Little over this shiat.

I hope we do. Anything that gets people paying attention to space and realising the need to increase funding for research for all things extra-terrestrial is a good thing. It will have knock on effects in other branches of astronomy as well. Let the good times roll, under a cloud of panic.


Sorry, I'm not going to get on-board with deceitful practices to sell your budget priorities. That's wrong, and makes you no better than any other weasel special interest groups. Disgusting.
 
2014-03-06 10:33:13 PM
Meh call me when it gets over about 6km in diameter and in K/T type territory.
 
2014-03-06 11:21:42 PM

mongbiohazard: Then there's the one that blew up over Russia last year that no one (who likes Russia) saw coming...

 
2014-03-06 11:58:18 PM
We talk about size/masses often. How big an effect does the speed of the object have? Does 7km/s vs 10km/s matter?
 
2014-03-07 08:05:56 AM

Frederf: We talk about size/masses often. How big an effect does the speed of the object have? Does 7km/s vs 10km/s matter?


In the medium size ranges, velocity plays a significant role in determining impact/airburst energy. Once you get up to the ELE class rocks, velocity just dictates how much time you have to kiss your ass good-bye once it's detected.
 
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