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(STV.tv)   Cab driver suspended after throwing Gaelic speakers out of his taxi. In his defence, he honestly did believe that they were all choking on something   (news.stv.tv) divider line 53
    More: Amusing, Gaelic, Gaelic speakers, taxi driver, private hire, Glasgow City Council  
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2513 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Mar 2014 at 12:33 PM (37 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-06 11:25:57 AM  
"Gaelic" isn't a language.  Irish is a language.
 
2014-03-06 12:11:31 PM  
A language is a dialect with an air force.
 
2014-03-06 12:39:09 PM  
I don't blame him.  I bought a set of 'Blawpunkt' speakers out of the back of some guys van, and I had to throw them out too since they sucked.
 
2014-03-06 12:39:12 PM  
Scots and irish are both Celtic. Similar language. WTF?

/mebbe the taxi driver had some issues with "The Troubles"...
 
2014-03-06 12:39:31 PM  
Maybe he's an audiophile and prefers high-end speakers. I mean, he spends a lot of time in his vehicle. He should be able to at least enjoy some good music.
 
2014-03-06 12:39:47 PM  
encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com

Gay lick?

NTTIAWWT
 
2014-03-06 12:40:01 PM  
You just need someone to translate.

i1.ytimg.com

/"It's not the dog we need!"
 
2014-03-06 12:40:09 PM  
defenSe.

/murr'ca
 
2014-03-06 12:40:16 PM  
submitter is an idiot who obviously has never heard spoken irish.
 
2014-03-06 12:41:49 PM  
This is as ironic as black cab drivers refusing to pick up black passengers, because the Scots, particularly in the west of Scotland, where the Weegies live, are descended from Irish tribes, including ones from Donegal.

/the muir ye ken.
 
2014-03-06 12:41:52 PM  
When the passengers' grans find out, they'll put such a hex on him that his balls will wander around his body and eventually pop out of his ears when he sneezes.

Don't fark with the Gaelic language and the Gaelic language won't fark with you.

The Gaels have ways of spelling things that drive strong men to madness.

Chthulu, for example, is the Gaelic spelling of Kate.

"Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn" (Kiss me quick, Kate, before your Reverend Father sees us!)
 
2014-03-06 12:43:47 PM  
I would too. For me, it's Bose speaker or nuttin'.
 
2014-03-06 12:46:01 PM  
In his defense, it's Glasgow. They probably didn't know the local custom of offering your cab driver a little hit of heroin. Common courtesy.
 
2014-03-06 12:48:21 PM  

cgraves67: Maybe he's an audiophile and prefers high-end speakers. I mean, he spends a lot of time in his vehicle. He should be able to at least enjoy some good music.


So he's an automobile audiophile?
 
2014-03-06 12:51:31 PM  
I'm with the cabbie. Virtually nobody speaks Irish as their first language, and they bloody well can speak enough English to get by in Scotland; they were just being pretentious dicks about not speaking English.
 
2014-03-06 12:51:53 PM  
I dunno subby, heres, some hot chick singing in Irish.  Sounds okay to me.
 
2014-03-06 12:53:02 PM  
Gaelic is the name for a number of dialects and possibly languages such as Scotch Gaelic, Irish Gaelic, Welsh, and Cornish Gaelic. The language is named after the Gaels (of Gaul and the pays de Gaule) and was spoken across much of Europe when the Romans were still in swaddling clothes. The Celts or Kelts (it is correctly pronounced with a hard or a soft "c" and don't let anybody tell you otherwise) were a culture that once spread across most of Europe. We get Celtic from the French (Celtiques) and Keltic from the Romans (kelticus). That is the main difference except that if an Englishman chooses to use one or other other, it is the wrong one.

Modern Irish is a reconstructed language like modern Hebrew as spoken in Israel. Both were nationalistic creations and are somewhat arbitrary. Especially the Irish spelling. They throw in every consonant they can think of and then don't pronounce any of them.

I watched a movie in Scots Gaelic once. What a soft, lilting and beautiful language it was. Absolutely nothing whatsoever like Scottish English. Imagine the difference between a raging Scotsman and Mrs. Doubtfire and then multiply that by ten.

As observed by Jean-Jacques Rousseau, people who live out in the open air speak softly and distinctly, while us urbanites are often harsh and ugly speakers who mangle the Mother tongue, whatever it may be.

The Gaelic I heard was the sweet whispering of the sea breeze across prairies full of wild flowers and sweet-scented hay. It was scented with lavender or possibly the vanishing whiff of lilac.

I imagine that a low caste Dubliner sounds like a pig squeeling in terror in an abattoir by comparison.

So don't bad mouth the Gaelic or the Gaelic Mouth will chew you up and spit out your bones to spell the Gaelic word for something you should have done last Thursday but won't get around to doing until after the next Christmas but one.
 
2014-03-06 12:53:40 PM  
Pog mo thoin
 
2014-03-06 12:53:43 PM  
I'm willing to bet he was a Rangers supporter and a anti-Irish bigot.
 
2014-03-06 12:54:18 PM  
 "I've had a rough night, and I hate the farking Eagles, man."
 
2014-03-06 12:56:31 PM  

brantgoose: Gaelic is the name for a number of dialects and possibly languages such as Scotch Gaelic, Irish Gaelic, Welsh, and Cornish Gaelic. The language is named after the Gaels (of Gaul and the pays de Gaule) and was spoken across much of Europe when the Romans were still in swaddling clothes. The Celts or Kelts (it is correctly pronounced with a hard or a soft "c" and don't let anybody tell you otherwise) were a culture that once spread across most of Europe. We get Celtic from the French (Celtiques) and Keltic from the Romans (kelticus). That is the main difference except that if an Englishman chooses to use one or other other, it is the wrong one.

Modern Irish is a reconstructed language like modern Hebrew as spoken in Israel. Both were nationalistic creations and are somewhat arbitrary. Especially the Irish spelling. They throw in every consonant they can think of and then don't pronounce any of them.

I watched a movie in Scots Gaelic once. What a soft, lilting and beautiful language it was. Absolutely nothing whatsoever like Scottish English. Imagine the difference between a raging Scotsman and Mrs. Doubtfire and then multiply that by ten.

As observed by Jean-Jacques Rousseau, people who live out in the open air speak softly and distinctly, while us urbanites are often harsh and ugly speakers who mangle the Mother tongue, whatever it may be.

The Gaelic I heard was the sweet whispering of the sea breeze across prairies full of wild flowers and sweet-scented hay. It was scented with lavender or possibly the vanishing whiff of lilac.

I imagine that a low caste Dubliner sounds like a pig squeeling in terror in an abattoir by comparison.

So don't bad mouth the Gaelic or the Gaelic Mouth will chew you up and spit out your bones to spell the Gaelic word for something you should have done last Thursday but won't get around to doing until after the next Christmas but one.


You're probably New Jersey irish
 
2014-03-06 12:56:45 PM  

mark12A: Scots and irish are both Celtic. Similar language. WTF?

/mebbe the taxi driver had some issues with "The Troubles"...


No, Scots is actually a dialect of English, or it's own West Germanic language. Scottish Gaelic is however a Celtic language. There are three languages in Scotland, Scots, English, and Scottish Gaelic; there are also various dialects of those.

Example of Scots (part of an excerpt of Robbie Burns):

My memory's no worth a preen; I had amaist forgotten clean, Ye bade me write you what they mean By this "new-light," 'Bout which our herds sae aft hae been Maist like to fight.

If you understand it, it likely isn't a Gaelic language.
 
2014-03-06 12:56:57 PM  
Amusing tag is poor choice for a racist and likely sectarian hate incident.
 
2014-03-06 12:58:38 PM  
sentunim:

No, Scots is actually a dialect of English, or it's own West Germanic language. Scottish Gaelic is however a Celtic language. There are three languages in Scotland, Scots, English, and Scottish Gaelic; there are also various dialects of those.


its*
 
2014-03-06 01:03:49 PM  
Maybe the bastards did not appreciate the Eagles.
 
2014-03-06 01:06:28 PM  

Barton Fink: submitter is an idiot who obviously has never heard spoken irish.


this. we were in Ireland last year and typically, in rural areas (mainly in the south/southwest) is where you will find Gaelic language still spoken; in fact, most of the signs are in English and Gaelic.. examples:

img.fark.net


img.fark.net

/sipping on drought Heineken
 
2014-03-06 01:07:03 PM  

toraque: I don't blame him.  I bought a set of 'Blawpunkt' speakers out of the back of some guys van, and I had to throw them out too since they sucked.


I prefer Crwyn Vygha.
 
2014-03-06 01:07:40 PM  
In cabbie's defense, you don't Irish travellers near your car. 5 minutes and they'll have a caravan hitched to it.
 
2014-03-06 01:11:35 PM  
One sentence and I farked it up...

In cabbie's defense, you don't  want Irish travellers near your car. 5 minutes and they'll have a caravan hitched to it.
 
2014-03-06 01:15:46 PM  

Harry Freakstorm: I would too. For me, it's Bose speaker or nuttin'.


Do you swear by Monster cables too?

/Bose sucks
 
2014-03-06 01:16:39 PM  

mbillips: I'm with the cabbie. Virtually nobody speaks Irish as their first language, and they bloody well can speak enough English to get by in Scotland; they were just being pretentious dicks about not speaking English.


I have to be a bit more liberal than that because I can speak more or less two languages.

I really don't understand the Anglo mania for hating on other languages. Perhaps it is because the anglophones can't be arsed to learn any language, including very often, their own, or simply because they are insular and chauvinistic. They are paranoid and think other people are always talking about them and not too kindly, as they may rightly suspect. This is not true though. Other people don't care. They stopped talking about your ugly mug shortly after they got into the cab.

We have the right to free speech and as far as I am concerned, that includes the choice of language in a private conversation. Canada is a bilingual country and thus divided on the issue, but I don't think either English or French Canadians should worry a bit if the other language is spoken in a private conversation, or indeed, if other people wish to jabber away in any other language (Vive l'allophonie!). Except Klingon, of course. Damned militarist romantics. I won't be having with them. Or Elves. Filthy beasts they are, that bewitch you with their glamour and give you twigs and leaves to eat as foie gras and caviar. They're worse then hippies. Hippies don't carry long swords. Well, not when they're sane. Out of their mind on acid, they've been known to be very dangerous.

Another thing that gets my goat is flags. Americans have so many myths about flags. Originally all that flag etiquette BS only applied to official government flags. Some think it is an insult to fly any flag but their own. On their own soil that is. You can fly the US flag anywhere you like. It's not nationalism, it's patriotism. Others fly the Stars and Bars. Fie on them!

Ha!

One man's nationalism is another man's patriotism and both fade into chauvinism and xenophobia. Nuts to you all! A plague on both of your houses, as the Doge of Venice says to the Montagues and Catapults, Catalepts, Marketeers and Crapulets*, whatever.

*Got that from Dilbert, the TV cartoon. The Dilbert & Juliet episode.

Stupid English people, flying the flag of Saint George because they think they're some kind of minority in their own country. Next thing they'll be getting falling down drunk on Saint George's day and we'll have the full set of beer mugs: Saint Andrew, Saint George, Saint Patrick and Saint Taffy.

Meh. The patron saint of my country is Saint Joseph. He was a famous drunk (as you would be if your first born was the Son of God and a 16 year old Virgin you had to marry for decency's sake) and nobody drinks on his day, not even the Belgians who share the patron of carpentry, furniture-making, wood-working and lumbering with us. If I were from Quebec or a proper Acadian, I could have Saint Anne, the Grandmother of Christ, as national Patroness and wouldn't have to drink to the biatch. She is Santa Claus's Mother according to neo-legend and only has a glass of sherry now and then, on Christmas Eve and every other day.

But maybe that's just my problem. Too many saints in the French Quarter of the family tree. Quite a few boozers as well, as their French surnames prove. Tons of teetotalitarians and drunks on the English side. One Old New France cousin was nicknamed Glug-Glug (in French the word gives us the word Gargoyle) and another was named Spanish Wine (Vin d'Espagne). Sherry, baby? Have some Madiera, m'dear!

But enough. No more. 'Tis not so sweet now as it 'twas before.
 
2014-03-06 01:17:11 PM  

brantgoose: Gaelic is the name for a number of dialects and possibly languages such as Scotch Gaelic, Irish Gaelic, Welsh, and Cornish Gaelic. The language is named after the Gaels (of Gaul and the pays de Gaule)


Claiming that the Gauls were Gaels: Total bullshiat. The Gaulish languages have no living descendents. Likewise, you're full of even more shiat to claim that Welsh is Gaelic. The Welsh do not speak Gaelic and a Welshman who speaks Cymraeg will make you eat your own nuts for saying he speaks Gaelic. Cornish is also not Gaelic. Welsh (Cymraeg) and Cornish (Kernewek) are Brythonic.
 
2014-03-06 01:19:02 PM  

Badgerlad: In cabbie's defense, you don't Irish travellers near your car. 5 minutes and they'll have a caravan hitched to it.


If they were speaking Irish Gaelic, that didn't make them Travelers. Shelta is as heavily based on English as on Irish.
 
2014-03-06 01:21:14 PM  

brantgoose: mbillips: I'm with the cabbie. Virtually nobody speaks Irish as their first language, and they bloody well can speak enough English to get by in Scotland; they were just being pretentious dicks about not speaking English.

I have to be a bit more liberal than that because I can speak more or less two languages.

I really don't understand the Anglo mania for hating on other languages. Perhaps it is because the anglophones can't be arsed to learn any language, including very often, their own, or simply because they are insular and chauvinistic. They are paranoid


What amuses me is how Englanders pretend to not understand people who speak a dialect of English that isn't sufficiently mid-country enough when I, a mere Yank, can do so.
 
2014-03-06 01:22:28 PM  

Slypork: Pog mo thoin


I like their work.
 
2014-03-06 01:23:25 PM  
The messiest parts of my family tree are the Scots-Irish-Welsh, who spell their names forty ways for Sunday and the nobility, who change their names and titles more often than they change their shirts, which is at least once a day and possibly more than ten times a day.

I have a lot of duplicates because of this and it's hard to tell whether you are lookinig a one man or a score of them.

Being drunk would really make the smallest room crowded when you go to take a p**** if you are a Scottish nobleman or an Irish King. Fortunately they mostly just pissed out of the window until about 1850. There wasn't any room to do it in the privy.
 
2014-03-06 01:28:12 PM  
2wolves

"Gaelic" isn't a language. Irish is a language.

No. In English, "Irish" and "Gaelic" are both languages. "Irish" refers to Gaeilge or a regional dialect of Irish (Gaelainn, Gaoluinn, etc.), "Gaelic" usually (but not exclusively) refers to Gàidhlig. This is somewhat arbitrary, but they're both languages.

brantgoose

Gaelic is the name for a number of dialects and possibly languages such as Scotch Gaelic, Irish Gaelic, Welsh, and Cornish Gaelic.

No. Welsh and Cornish are Brythonic languages, not Gaelic.

The language is named after the Gaels (of Gaul and the pays de Gaule)...

No. Gaulish was a largely separate Celtic language family. "Gaelic" (of whatever striple) is named after its speakers, who refer to themselves as Gaeil (in whatever dialectical version, plural).

Modern Irish is a reconstructed language like modern Hebrew as spoken in Israel. Both were nationalistic creations and are somewhat arbitrary.

No. Modern standard Irish is just that, a standardisation. It is not a reconstruction of anything, as the language has been continually spoken. It as much as "reconstruction" as modern standard German, which is to say it's not a reconstruction at all, but an attempt at unifying dialects into a comprehensible standard (which many people watch television or read in, but safely ignore when at home).

/random no
//no's everywhere
 
2014-03-06 01:34:57 PM  

Silly_Sot: Badgerlad: In cabbie's defense, you don't Irish travellers near your car. 5 minutes and they'll have a caravan hitched to it.

If they were speaking Irish Gaelic, that didn't make them Travelers. Shelta is as heavily based on English as on Irish.


I wasn't being entirely serious with that one. Going for a subtle hint of "they were Irish and had crossed a border. Also, a cab ride is a form of travel".
 
2014-03-06 02:00:28 PM  

brantgoose: mbillips: I'm with the cabbie. Virtually nobody speaks Irish as their first language, and they bloody well can speak enough English to get by in Scotland; they were just being pretentious dicks about not speaking English.

I have to be a bit more liberal than that because I can speak more or less two languages.

I really don't understand the Anglo mania for hating on other languages. Perhaps it is because the anglophones can't be arsed to learn any language, including very often, their own, or simply because they are insular and chauvinistic. They are paranoid and think other people are always talking about them and not too kindly, as they may rightly suspect. This is not true though. Other people don't care. They stopped talking about your ugly mug shortly after they got into the cab.

We have the right to free speech and as far as I am concerned, that includes the choice of language in a private conversation. Canada is a bilingual country and thus divided on the issue, but I don't think either English or French Canadians should worry a bit if the other language is spoken in a private conversation, or indeed, if other people wish to jabber away in any other language (Vive l'allophonie!). Except Klingon, of course. Damned militarist romantics. I won't be having with them. Or Elves. Filthy beasts they are, that bewitch you with their glamour and give you twigs and leaves to eat as foie gras and caviar. They're worse then hippies. Hippies don't carry long swords. Well, not when they're sane. Out of their mind on acid, they've been known to be very dangerous.

Another thing that gets my goat is flags. Americans have so many myths about flags. Originally all that flag etiquette BS only applied to official government flags. Some think it is an insult to fly any flag but their own. On their own soil that is. You can fly the US flag anywhere you like. It's not nationalism, it's patriotism. Others fly the Stars and Bars. Fie on them!

Ha!

One man's nationalism is another m ...


Was it normal that I heard an Irish brogue when I read this?
 
2014-03-06 02:21:11 PM  

brantgoose: mbillips: I'm with the cabbie. Virtually nobody speaks Irish as their first language, and they bloody well can speak enough English to get by in Scotland; they were just being pretentious dicks about not speaking English.


I have to be a bit more liberal than that because I can speak more or less two languages.

I really don't understand the Anglo mania for hating on other languages. Perhaps it is because the anglophones can't be arsed to learn any language, including very often, their own, or simply because they are insular and chauvinistic. They are paranoid and think other people are always talking about them and not too kindly, as they may rightly suspect. This is not true though. Other people don't care. They stopped talking about your ugly mug shortly after they got into the cab.


Well, sure, the cabby should mind his own business if they're having a private conversation in Irish or Double Dutch or Pig Latin. I was assuming they tried to give him directions in Irish. At which point, get out of the farking cab and go buy a phrase dictionary, as if you don't speak fluent English already.
 
2014-03-06 03:06:16 PM  

mark12A: Scots and irish are both Celtic. Similar language. WTF?

/mebbe the taxi driver had some issues with "The Troubles"...


Nothing to do with the language itself only what it says about their religion. If passengers were speaking Irish Gaelic it identified them as being from Southern Ireland (Eire) and therefore Catholic. Sadly, there is as much prejudice between Protestants & Catholics in Scotland as there is in N Ireland.
 
2014-03-06 03:06:27 PM  

Slypork: Pog mo thoin


Téigh trasna ort féin
 
2014-03-06 04:05:20 PM  

brantgoose: So don't bad mouth the Gaelic or the Gaelic Mouth will chew you up and spit out your bones to spell the Gaelic word for something you should have done last Thursday but won't get around to doing until after the next Christmas but one.


I wouldn't think of it. I've travelled extensively in rural Ireland...it builds a proper thrist...and even outside of the Gaeltacht, there's plenty of evidence that Irish grammar has and continues to affect the way the Irish speak English. One of my favourite examples is what I call the "Irish conditional", which is a sort of call and response to an amiable proposition:

"So, Seamus, would you be wanting to go for a glass?"
"Sure, that I would. You paying?"
"I would, if you would be crossing the road to the ATM".
"I would, sure".

I've heard variations on this all over the Republic.
 
2014-03-06 04:07:16 PM  

sentunim: sentunim:

No, Scots is actually a dialect of English, or it's own West Germanic language. Scottish Gaelic is however a Celtic language. There are three languages in Scotland, Scots, English, and Scottish Gaelic; there are also various dialects of those.


its*


files.fraterslibertas.com
 
2014-03-06 04:09:41 PM  

Silly_Sot: brantgoose: Gaelic is the name for a number of dialects and possibly languages such as Scotch Gaelic, Irish Gaelic, Welsh, and Cornish Gaelic. The language is named after the Gaels (of Gaul and the pays de Gaule)

Claiming that the Gauls were Gaels: Total bullshiat. The Gaulish languages have no living descendents. Likewise, you're full of even more shiat to claim that Welsh is Gaelic. The Welsh do not speak Gaelic and a Welshman who speaks Cymraeg will make you eat your own nuts for saying he speaks Gaelic. Cornish is also not Gaelic. Welsh (Cymraeg) and Cornish (Kernewek) are Brythonic.


Mind your Ps and Qs?
 
2014-03-06 04:19:13 PM  
Good thing dey wasn't talkin' no Ebonics.
 
2014-03-06 05:06:49 PM  

Valiente: Silly_Sot: brantgoose: Gaelic is the name for a number of dialects and possibly languages such as Scotch Gaelic, Irish Gaelic, Welsh, and Cornish Gaelic. The language is named after the Gaels (of Gaul and the pays de Gaule)

Claiming that the Gauls were Gaels: Total bullshiat. The Gaulish languages have no living descendents. Likewise, you're full of even more shiat to claim that Welsh is Gaelic. The Welsh do not speak Gaelic and a Welshman who speaks Cymraeg will make you eat your own nuts for saying he speaks Gaelic. Cornish is also not Gaelic. Welsh (Cymraeg) and Cornish (Kernewek) are Brythonic.

Mind your Ps and Qs?


*slowclap*

I don't care if nobody else in the thread gets that pun.  I'm impressed.

/read a book once called Teach Yourself Irish
//I'm apparently not a very good Irish Teacher
///got three pages in and discovered it's worse than French
 
2014-03-06 06:51:09 PM  
I've always had an interest in, and a study of, linguistics. In the Gaeltacht, I encountered an old woman who clearly spoke English infrequently, and her Irish accent had some unusual features, like an inability to sound out "w". So when she said "I went to work", it came out "I vent to verk", but in a sort of almost-Indian accent.

It made me think "geez, this is what proto-Indo European sounded like...a bit Bollywood".

And who doesn't like PIE?
 
2014-03-06 06:54:55 PM  
Valiente

In the Gaeltacht, I encountered an old woman who clearly spoke English infrequently, and her Irish accent had some unusual features, like an inability to sound out "w".

That's odd, considering that Irish has that sound. Maybe it was a speech impediment more than her accent.
 
2014-03-06 07:43:10 PM  

jamspoon: mark12A: Scots and irish are both Celtic. Similar language. WTF?

/mebbe the taxi driver had some issues with "The Troubles"...

Nothing to do with the language itself only what it says about their religion. If passengers were speaking Irish Gaelic it identified them as being from Southern Ireland (Eire) and therefore Catholic. Sadly, there is as much prejudice between Protestants & Catholics in Scotland as there is in N Ireland.


They're from Donegal though. There's a good chance they were Prod or even Presbyterian.

I'm a prod from Donegal who speaks Irish. Not too well anymore though.
 
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