Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Reuters)   Recent university graduates with arts degrees found to be a millstone around the neck of Britain's economic recovery   (uk.reuters.com) divider line 28
    More: Sad, Britain, economic recovery, British Universities, Warrington, modern language, political coalition, neck, Office for National Statistics  
•       •       •

913 clicks; posted to Business » on 06 Mar 2014 at 12:01 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



28 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-03-06 11:08:45 AM  
TFA doesn't say arts degrees. And to be fair, everyone I know with an arts degree is doing pretty well over here; everyone I know that's long-term unemployed has an engineering degree or a business degree. Or no degree at all.
 
2014-03-06 11:10:00 AM  
TFA's conclusion that apprenticeships are the answer is very medieval. I like it.
 
2014-03-06 11:29:57 AM  
I imagine this goes for the US, too.
 
2014-03-06 12:25:02 PM  
In before the Fark Engineers arrive and tell us that college should just be for dull people that find Dilbert funny.

/Not everyone wants to be an Engineer
 
2014-03-06 12:29:44 PM  

unlikely: TFA's conclusion that apprenticeships are the answer is very medieval. I like it.


Err, yeah, that is just a vocational training program the government introduced a couple of decades ago that has been moderately successful:


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apprenticeship#Revitalisation_from_1990 s_ on


It can basically be seen as government support system/subsidy that parallels the college/university system in more "vocational" employment areas where self employment is common - plumbers, electricians, that sort of thing.
 
2014-03-06 12:41:52 PM  

Aar1012: In before the Fark Engineers arrive and tell us that college should just be for dull people that find Dilbert funny.

/Not everyone wants to be an Engineer


Dilbert's the reason no one wants to follow a STEM track.
 
2014-03-06 12:46:03 PM  

Aar1012: In before the Fark Engineers arrive and tell us that college should just be for dull people that find Dilbert funny.

/Not everyone wants to be an Engineer


Well not everyone can be as cool as us engineers are.
 
2014-03-06 12:51:58 PM  
"But they have massive debts and are in jobs they could have got without studying beyond school."

bs, stopped reading there.
 
2014-03-06 12:54:50 PM  

wildcardjack: Aar1012: In before the Fark Engineers arrive and tell us that college should just be for dull people that find Dilbert funny.

/Not everyone wants to be an Engineer

Dilbert's the reason no one wants to follow a STEM track.


pretty much. Dilbert wouldn't even be funny if it weren't so poignantly true all the time.
 
2014-03-06 12:55:31 PM  
Britain is like the little brother that copies everything we do, especially the stupid stuff. "I once drank a whole glass of turpentine and had to spend a week in the hospital." *Glug Glug Glug* "Like that?" *Thud*
 
2014-03-06 12:59:04 PM  

Aar1012: In before the Fark Engineers arrive and tell us that college should just be for dull people that find Dilbert funny.

/Not everyone wants to be an Engineer


I never got why people working in STEM jobs would be pushing others to go to school for STEM stuff, it just drives down their own wages. The IT field has been on the receiving end of this to an extent for a little while and I for one welcome young people going into the liberal arts.
 
2014-03-06 01:11:56 PM  

bsharitt: Aar1012: In before the Fark Engineers arrive and tell us that college should just be for dull people that find Dilbert funny.

/Not everyone wants to be an Engineer

I never got why people working in STEM jobs would be pushing others to go to school for STEM stuff, it just drives down their own wages. The IT field has been on the receiving end of this to an extent for a little while and I for one welcome young people going into the liberal arts.


Exactly.   Now let me tell you about how awesome ditch digging can be
 
2014-03-06 01:14:50 PM  

unlikely: TFA doesn't say arts degrees. And to be fair, everyone I know with an arts degree is doing pretty well over here; everyone I know that's long-term unemployed has an engineering degree or a business degree. Or no degree at all.


Suck it Liberal Arts haters.... The Chronicle of Higher Education, THE publication for all forms of education at the college level, published in January 2014 a comparison of "Arts" degree earnings compared to all other degrees.... Liberal arts majors begin their careers earning less than other disciplines (including technology fields) but by the time they are 50 years old they start to outperform the average earned in all of the other disciplines.

The starting salary for a lib arts major in the 21-25 age group is $26,271 as compared to $31,183 in the "Professional and Pre-Professional" group. By the time they are 50? The Lib Arts majors are averaging $67,583 compared to everyone else earning $66,185. The ability to communicate effectively pays off biatches in the long run.

/Suck it long, suck it hard

//Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education (January 31, 2014). Volume 60, Number 20.

///Professor in a Liberal Arts Field
 
2014-03-06 01:18:25 PM  

The Evil Home Brewer: unlikely: TFA doesn't say arts degrees. And to be fair, everyone I know with an arts degree is doing pretty well over here; everyone I know that's long-term unemployed has an engineering degree or a business degree. Or no degree at all.

Suck it Liberal Arts haters.... The Chronicle of Higher Education, THE publication for all forms of education at the college level, published in January 2014 a comparison of "Arts" degree earnings compared to all other degrees.... Liberal arts majors begin their careers earning less than other disciplines (including technology fields) but by the time they are 50 years old they start to outperform the average earned in all of the other disciplines.

The starting salary for a lib arts major in the 21-25 age group is $26,271 as compared to $31,183 in the "Professional and Pre-Professional" group. By the time they are 50? The Lib Arts majors are averaging $67,583 compared to everyone else earning $66,185. The ability to communicate effectively pays off biatches in the long run.

/Suck it long, suck it hard

//Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education (January 31, 2014). Volume 60, Number 20.

///Professor in a Liberal Arts Field


counter point: time value of money
 
2014-03-06 01:18:28 PM  
what was the obvious tag in the unemployment line?
 
2014-03-06 01:22:27 PM  

The Evil Home Brewer: The starting salary for a lib arts major in the 21-25 age group is $26,271 as compared to $31,183 in the "Professional and Pre-Professional" group. By the time they are 50? The Lib Arts majors are averaging $67,583 compared to everyone else earning $66,185. The ability to communicate effectively pays off biatches in the long run.


Hey, I hate to burst your bubble there, but engineers typically make what your 50 year old liberal arts majors make..... by the time they're 30.
 
2014-03-06 01:35:03 PM  

dfenstrate: The Evil Home Brewer: The starting salary for a lib arts major in the 21-25 age group is $26,271 as compared to $31,183 in the "Professional and Pre-Professional" group. By the time they are 50? The Lib Arts majors are averaging $67,583 compared to everyone else earning $66,185. The ability to communicate effectively pays off biatches in the long run.

Hey, I hate to burst your bubble there, but engineers typically make what your 50 year old liberal arts majors make..... by the time they're 30.


He had citations with data.

I'm gonna have to go with [citation needed].
 
2014-03-06 01:38:56 PM  
  

The Evil Home Brewer: /Suck it long, suck it hard

//Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education (January 31, 2014). Volume 60, Number 20.

///Professor in a Liberal Arts Field


"At peak earning ages (56-60), graduates with a baccalaureate degree in a humanities or social science field are making $40,000 more than they were as recent graduates (21-25). And while in the years following graduation they earn $5,000 less than people with professional or pre-professional degrees, liberal arts majors earn $2,000 more at peak earning ages, when they make about $66,000. (Salaries in both fields still lag behind engineering and math and sciences graduates, who in their late 50s make about $98,000 and $87,000, respectively.)"

http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2014/01/22/see-how-liberal-arts-g ra ds-really-fare-report-examines-long-term-data

I guess reading comprehension comes later in life to you liberal arts guys, huh?
 
2014-03-06 01:50:38 PM  
Now that you need a college degree to get a menial office job you may as well go study art or something else useless that you enjoy since you won't ever use your specialty again anyway.

It's great that we want everyone to go to college, that problem is that the number of college level jobs hasn't increased.
 
2014-03-06 02:46:09 PM  

The Evil Home Brewer: unlikely: TFA doesn't say arts degrees. And to be fair, everyone I know with an arts degree is doing pretty well over here; everyone I know that's long-term unemployed has an engineering degree or a business degree. Or no degree at all.

Suck it Liberal Arts haters.... The Chronicle of Higher Education, THE publication for all forms of education at the college level, published in January 2014 a comparison of "Arts" degree earnings compared to all other degrees.... Liberal arts majors begin their careers earning less than other disciplines (including technology fields) but by the time they are 50 years old they start to outperform the average earned in all of the other disciplines.

The starting salary for a lib arts major in the 21-25 age group is $26,271 as compared to $31,183 in the "Professional and Pre-Professional" group. By the time they are 50? The Lib Arts majors are averaging $67,583 compared to everyone else earning $66,185. The ability to communicate effectively pays off biatches in the long run.

/Suck it long, suck it hard

//Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education (January 31, 2014). Volume 60, Number 20.

///Professor in a Liberal Arts Field


Only a Liberal Arts professor would think that underperforming one's peers for 30 years starting at 16% is vindicated by "outperfroming" them by 2% starting in your 50s.  Assuming a linear increase, you MIGHT break even by the time you're 60.  Even if you do, you've lost all the compound interest of all that money you didn't earn early on.  It's a Pyrrhic victory.

In other words:

i.imgur.com
 
2014-03-06 02:54:56 PM  

AngryDragon: The Evil Home Brewer: unlikely: TFA doesn't say arts degrees. And to be fair, everyone I know with an arts degree is doing pretty well over here; everyone I know that's long-term unemployed has an engineering degree or a business degree. Or no degree at all.

Suck it Liberal Arts haters.... The Chronicle of Higher Education, THE publication for all forms of education at the college level, published in January 2014 a comparison of "Arts" degree earnings compared to all other degrees.... Liberal arts majors begin their careers earning less than other disciplines (including technology fields) but by the time they are 50 years old they start to outperform the average earned in all of the other disciplines.

The starting salary for a lib arts major in the 21-25 age group is $26,271 as compared to $31,183 in the "Professional and Pre-Professional" group. By the time they are 50? The Lib Arts majors are averaging $67,583 compared to everyone else earning $66,185. The ability to communicate effectively pays off biatches in the long run.

/Suck it long, suck it hard

//Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education (January 31, 2014). Volume 60, Number 20.

///Professor in a Liberal Arts Field

Only a Liberal Arts professor would think that underperforming one's peers for 30 years starting at 16% is vindicated by "outperfroming" them by 2% starting in your 50s.  Assuming a linear increase, you MIGHT break even by the time you're 60.  Even if you do, you've lost all the compound interest of all that money you didn't earn early on.  It's a Pyrrhic victory.

In other words:

[i.imgur.com image 480x360]


"Professional and Pre-Professional" basically means business and pre-law (or pre-med).  Judging by the number of degrees handed out in each of those fields, it's safe to assume that this categorey is dominated by people with business degrees.  This is comparing people with degrees in the liberal arts to people with business degrees.  Anybody can get a business degree.  Hell, even I have a business degree and I'm a moron.  Not exactly a great sign for those with liberal arts degrees.

/Also, people with pre-law degrees score the worst on the LSAT compared to every other college major.  That's pretty funny.
 
2014-03-06 03:00:10 PM  
 

llortcM_yllort: AngryDragon: The Evil Home Brewer: unlikely: TFA doesn't say arts degrees. And to be fair, everyone I know with an arts degree is doing pretty well over here; everyone I know that's long-term unemployed has an engineering degree or a business degree. Or no degree at all.

Suck it Liberal Arts haters.... The Chronicle of Higher Education, THE publication for all forms of education at the college level, published in January 2014 a comparison of "Arts" degree earnings compared to all other degrees.... Liberal arts majors begin their careers earning less than other disciplines (including technology fields) but by the time they are 50 years old they start to outperform the average earned in all of the other disciplines.

The starting salary for a lib arts major in the 21-25 age group is $26,271 as compared to $31,183 in the "Professional and Pre-Professional" group. By the time they are 50? The Lib Arts majors are averaging $67,583 compared to everyone else earning $66,185. The ability to communicate effectively pays off biatches in the long run.

/Suck it long, suck it hard

//Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education (January 31, 2014). Volume 60, Number 20.

///Professor in a Liberal Arts Field

Only a Liberal Arts professor would think that underperforming one's peers for 30 years starting at 16% is vindicated by "outperfroming" them by 2% starting in your 50s.  Assuming a linear increase, you MIGHT break even by the time you're 60.  Even if you do, you've lost all the compound interest of all that money you didn't earn early on.  It's a Pyrrhic victory.

In other words:

[i.imgur.com image 480x360]

"Professional and Pre-Professional" basically means business and pre-law (or pre-med).  Judging by the number of degrees handed out in each of those fields, it's safe to assume that this categorey is dominated by people with business degrees.  This is comparing people with degrees in the liberal arts to people with business degrees.  Anybody can get a business degree.  H ...


but he goes on to ruminate...
by the time they are 50 years old they start to outperform the average earned in all of the other disciplines.

where he is patently wrong

/i am an idiot with a business degree too
//i sense a trend!
///or i would if i had passed that class
 
2014-03-06 03:11:01 PM  
LOL.... *Grabs another bag of popcorn*
Not trolling here.... Just citing a credible source to offset the common belief that Lib Arts people serve burgers and fries.

/Don't get your panties in a wad ladies
 
2014-03-06 03:11:39 PM  

johnny_vegas: The Evil Home Brewer: /Suck it long, suck it hard

//Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education (January 31, 2014). Volume 60, Number 20.

///Professor in a Liberal Arts Field

"At peak earning ages (56-60), graduates with a baccalaureate degree in a humanities or social science field are making $40,000 more than they were as recent graduates (21-25). And while in the years following graduation they earn $5,000 less than people with professional or pre-professional degrees, liberal arts majors earn $2,000 more at peak earning ages, when they make about $66,000. (Salaries in both fields still lag behind engineering and math and sciences graduates, who in their late 50s make about $98,000 and $87,000, respectively.)"

http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2014/01/22/see-how-liberal-arts-g ra ds-really-fare-report-examines-long-term-data

I guess reading comprehension comes later in life to you liberal arts guys, huh?


The problem with using people in their late 50's to gauge degree marketability is that they graduated over thirty years ago.  They spent their entire lives in a completely different job market than what their kids currently are experiencing.  Similarly, by the time people currently in college reach their late 50's themselves, the job market will be very different than what it is now.  Those numbers don't mean a whole lot to people that are currently in a position to make use of them.

This is especially important for people who are trying to get degrees in math or the natural sciences.  When people are talking about a "STEM shortage," what they really mean is a shortage of engineers, programmers, and IT.  They do not mean a shortage of people with math or physics degrees.  There is a glut of this group.  The fact that the people in their late 50s with math and science degrees out earn their liberal arts and business counterparts is a lot less relevant than people under 30 making less than their business school counterparts.

There are a lot of people with math degrees in shiatty jobs right about now.
 
2014-03-06 03:59:16 PM  

The Evil Home Brewer: LOL.... *Grabs another bag of popcorn*
Not trolling here.... Just citing a credible source to offset the common belief that Lib Arts people serve burgers and fries. /Don't get your panties in a wad ladies
.

I mis-cited a source and got pwned
 
2014-03-06 06:09:14 PM  

The Evil Home Brewer: LOL.... *Grabs another bag of popcorn*
Not trolling here.... Just citing a credible source to offset the common belief that Lib Arts people serve burgers and fries.

/Don't get your panties in a wad ladies


You don't seem smart enough to be a professor.
 
2014-03-06 06:23:45 PM  

rumpelstiltskin: Britain is like the little brother that copies everything we do, especially the stupid stuff. "I once drank a whole glass of turpentine and had to spend a week in the hospital." *Glug Glug Glug* "Like that?" *Thud*


Which is quite ironic, as Brits see the USA as the retard cousin who insists on copying the stupid shiat we did and realised didn't work 150 years ago.

/ You can choose your friends...
 
2014-03-07 08:45:16 AM  
The sum of human endeavors has become to make rich men richer.

All other pursuits (art, non-profitable science, etc.) are a waste of time.
 
Displayed 28 of 28 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report