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(Mother Nature Network)   San Francisco is about to ban the buying of bottled water on public property. Urinating on public property still cool   (mnn.com) divider line 23
    More: Interesting, San Francisco, plastic shopping bags, Dasani, American Beverage Association, board of supervisors, public property, town limits, Happy Meals  
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3167 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Mar 2014 at 10:17 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2014-03-06 10:22:40 AM  
3 votes:
Bla bla fascism, but I'm in favor of this experiment. The costs of bottled water are subsidized by us all and maybe forcing everyone to use the municipal water will keep it from turning into something used only by the poor and chronically underfunded.
2014-03-06 11:00:28 AM  
2 votes:
Don't laugh at dehydrated water. It's a real thing.

I saw some when I visited Loring Air Force Base, Aroostook County, Maine, on their open house day, many years ago, where they used to keep the big long range B-52 bombers because they were closer to the USSR and Europe there than any other place in the US.

Dehydrated water is a nasty foul product that you will drink if you have to (sort of like condensed milk). It contains some water, of course, but it is dehydrated because it is basically a sort of gel that can hold a lot more water. It gets this water by sucking it out of the air. I think it might also help to kill parasites and bacteria in water you gather while living off the land.

Even in a fairly dry environment, dehydrated water can rehydrate itself to a considerably larger volume than it has when packed in a can. So it forms part of the survival rations of US and other military personnel.

It is sort of like those tiny gel novelty toys that you soak in water and which grow to many, many times their dehydrated volume. You have probably seen those and like Bart Simpson you may imagine your gel T. rex growing to full size and swallowing your sister.
2014-03-06 10:44:45 AM  
2 votes:

Persnickety: One of the most foolish consumer trends I've seen arise within my lifetime has been the notion of selling water in little plastic bottles.  What a dumb dumb dumb idea.


There is a time and palace for them, just like there is a time and a place for single serve portions of juice or soda vs. gallon or two-liter jugs.  If I'm stuck in a government building waiting for something and I get thirsty, I just want one 12oz serving from the vending machine.  And don't talk tome about water fountains, where I live at least, the municipal water is disgusting.  (We filter it at home.)

What sticks in my craw is the wildly excessive use of those little landfill bombs.  My mother buys them by the case and uses them instead of drinking from the tap.   Again, the local water is crap so I can see filtering, and I could even understand buying the big two gallon refrigerator jugs of water, but she buys pallets of the little 12oz things for no discernible reason.  Half her trash it seems is little plastic water bottles.  THAT is the problem, not some guy stuck in the jury room at the courthouse who just wants a drink.
2014-03-06 10:28:55 AM  
2 votes:

Persnickety: One of the most foolish consumer trends I've seen arise within my lifetime has been the notion of selling water in little plastic bottles.  What a dumb dumb dumb idea.


It's quite the marketing ploy, isn't it?

I still can remember seeing pitchers of water served to tables.  Then came this myth that you should drink 8 glasses of water a day that got pushed, but nobody could really cite any research.

That's when a lot of idiots stopped pointing and laughing at Evian drinkers and noting that Evian spelled backwards in "naive".

I thought it funny when I was given a bottled water and noticed it had a "manufacture date" all the way down to the minute when it was bottled and an expiration date exactly one year later (although not down to the minute).

I always wondered what would happen to that water one year after it was bottled.
2014-03-06 10:26:54 AM  
2 votes:
As a resident of a state affected by idiots poisoning our water supply, I fully expect that SanFran's experiment would carve out an exception for distributing these little environment killers in case of disaster or crisis.  It's not like an earthquake could disrupt the delivery of water through their city or anything...
2014-03-06 10:22:01 AM  
2 votes:
One of the most foolish consumer trends I've seen arise within my lifetime has been the notion of selling water in little plastic bottles.  What a dumb dumb dumb idea.
2014-03-06 10:20:06 AM  
2 votes:
guyism.com
2014-03-06 11:59:01 AM  
1 votes:
Last month, several girlfriends and I went to SF for the weekend and stayed at the Hilton in Union Square. In 48 hours, we experienced the following:

~A grown man with his pants around his ankles, crapping against the hotel while squatting about 20 yards from the valet service

~A toothless hobo gumming bread that she had pulled directly from the garbage can

~A drunk dude puking out of the rear window of a taxi cab while the driver screamed at him to get the hell out of his cab

~A group of the angriest black men I've ever seen, yelling at any white woman passing by to get on her effing knees and worship them. When I shook my head in disbelief, they began coming after me, screaming at me and calling me every awful epithet imaginable. I ended up hiding in the Gap while SFPD was called out.

So it's nice to see that the SF City Council has the time and energy to ban, you know, water.
2014-03-06 11:45:34 AM  
1 votes:

Betep: I thought San Fran recycled.


Recycling is not good, it is simply less bad.
2014-03-06 11:27:13 AM  
1 votes:
Only bottle 21 ounces or less.... just start selling 1L bottles.

i.imgur.com
Failing that... just sell some dehydrated dihydrogen monoxide.


i.imgur.com
2014-03-06 11:20:28 AM  
1 votes:
Brought to you by:

www.sfbos.org
David Chiu grew up in Boston and received his undergraduate degree, law degree, and master's degree in public policy from Harvard University.

a civil rights attorney at the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights. In the mid-1990s, David served as Democratic Counsel to the U.S. Senate Constitution Subcommittee


All the problems a City of that size has, All that education, All that experience, and he comes up with

"No bottle water for you, I says so."


fireden.net
2014-03-06 11:05:20 AM  
1 votes:

reaperducer: For years, governments did everything they could to get people to drink more water.  Then when people started drinking water, they taxed it out the wazoo, or worse -- made it illegal, like in this story.

For years, governments did everything they could to get people to smoke less.  Now they're legalizing smoking marijuana in order to get that sweet, sweet tax money they're so addicted to.

What a crazy world we live in today.



Whatever you're doing is wrong; you should be doing something else.  Repent.
2014-03-06 11:03:43 AM  
1 votes:
Also, from TFA:

We all know with climate change, and the importance of combatting [sic] climate change, San Francisco has been leading the way to fight for our environment. That's why I ask you to support this ordinance to reduce and discourage single-use, single-serving plastic water bottles in San Francisco.

This is a complete non sequitur.  When plastic is used in a bottle, that plastic is generally not biodegradable -- so it cannot enter the atmosphere as CO2 unless someone burns the bottle.  If that crude oil is not used to make plastic, it will most likely be sent to a refinery and used as fuel.  In that case it will definitely end up in the atmosphere as CO2.  Non bio-degradable plastics are a form of carbon sequestration, pretty much by definition, so they are actually beneficial -- at least purely in terms of climate change.
2014-03-06 10:57:52 AM  
1 votes:
FTA: "The city's Board of Supervisors voted unanimously to initiate a phase-out of the sale and distribution of throwaway plastic water bottles 21 oz or smaller..."

22 oz bottles appear in 3, 2, 1...
2014-03-06 10:50:50 AM  
1 votes:

Molavian: Luckily, you can still buy bottled water on private property.

Like everywhere you buy it now.


Exactly.  Who does this affect?  Street vendors?

I'm not a big fan of bottled water, but this law is kinda ridiculous.
2014-03-06 10:44:38 AM  
1 votes:
You go Frisco, turn that city into the utopia you want it to be!

...then wonder sadly why it's going bankrupt and everyone moves out in a few years
2014-03-06 10:36:13 AM  
1 votes:

gfid: Persnickety: One of the most foolish consumer trends I've seen arise within my lifetime has been the notion of selling water in little plastic bottles.  What a dumb dumb dumb idea.

It's quite the marketing ploy, isn't it?

I still can remember seeing pitchers of water served to tables.  Then came this myth that you should drink 8 glasses of water a day that got pushed, but nobody could really cite any research.

That's when a lot of idiots stopped pointing and laughing at Evian drinkers and noting that Evian spelled backwards in "naive".

I thought it funny when I was given a bottled water and noticed it had a "manufacture date" all the way down to the minute when it was bottled and an expiration date exactly one year later (although not down to the minute).

I always wondered what would happen to that water one year after it was bottled.


You know that nasty plasticy taste the water gets from leaving the bottle out in the sun too long?  My guess is that.
2014-03-06 10:35:19 AM  
1 votes:
But highly sugared and artificially sweetened drinks are still okay, right?  What if they realize that those things also wind up in the litter stream, and are also bad for you?  What next?  Ban liquids?
2014-03-06 10:33:18 AM  
1 votes:
Banning the selling of water on public property I can maybe defend. Banning the buying of it seems explicitly unconstitutional under Buckley v. Valeo, as reinforced by Citizens United v. FEC. Purchases are speech.

But hey, it's not fascism when we do it.
2014-03-06 10:33:05 AM  
1 votes:
How about canned water?  Is that still cool, man?
2014-03-06 10:29:44 AM  
1 votes:

Persnickety: One of the most foolish consumer trends I've seen arise within my lifetime has been the notion of selling water in little plastic bottles.  What a dumb dumb dumb idea.


dangelder: Bla bla fascism, but I'm in favor of this experiment. The costs of bottled water are subsidized by us all and maybe forcing everyone to use the municipal water will keep it from turning into something used only by the poor and chronically underfunded.


But if someone takes their water and adds some carbonation, coloring and HFCS before selling it, you're cool with it.
2014-03-06 10:26:56 AM  
1 votes:
Luckily, you can still buy bottled water on private property.

Like everywhere you buy it now.
d23 [TotalFark]
2014-03-06 10:26:48 AM  
1 votes:

dangelder: Bla bla fascism, but I'm in favor of this experiment. The costs of bottled water are subsidized by us all and maybe forcing everyone to use the municipal water will keep it from turning into something used only by the poor and chronically underfunded.


Really, really confused by any bellyaching like this.  They are making a rule on land that they own.  The same group of biatchers would scream for days if "you gubmit tell me how to rum my buzzzzness", just like they do when we try to make bullshiat gay bans illegal.
 
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