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(Network World)   No choice but to stick with XP? Here are 9 steps you can take to delay the inevitable disaster   (networkworld.com) divider line 50
    More: Interesting, Windows XP, F-SECURE, anti-virus software, Network World  
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3535 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 Mar 2014 at 12:50 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



50 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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Archived thread
 
2014-03-05 12:07:52 PM  
Same thing you do with every device on your network.
 
2014-03-05 12:54:41 PM  
Or you run the world's largest communications company and use it as the accepted platform.  I'm looking at you AT&T.  Damn LSO testing requiring IE 8 and Java 6.41

Just a FarkNugget of a bastard
 
2014-03-05 12:59:50 PM  
LOL, I like the final suggestion...

Consider upgrading to a supported OS.

No shiat, Sherlock? Win7 is absolutely awesome. Yes, it's a pain here because we have hundreds of machines to convert over, but it's kind of stupid to end the list with "Or you could just skip our list entirely."...
 
2014-03-05 01:01:56 PM  
Our software is no longer compatible with XP since we had to move to .Net 4.5.

It's dead Jim.
 
2014-03-05 01:13:48 PM  
If, by, the term "Inevitable disaster", you mean turning your computer into a mega email spam source, porn video and picture server, and denial of service pinger, then, yes, I am with you on this.
 
2014-03-05 01:22:48 PM  
What if the system is not internet connected?  If I'm not checking email or launching browsers, is there really any risk of getting anything on the system to fark it up?
 
2014-03-05 01:31:40 PM  
 
2014-03-05 01:33:07 PM  

Stan Lee's Ghost: Or you run the world's largest communications company and use it as the accepted platform.  I'm looking at you AT&T.  Damn LSO testing requiring IE 8 and Java 6.41

Just a FarkNugget of a bastard


UBS was using XP and IE6 on their hardware *refresh* cycles in mid 2010. They *might* be on IE8 now.
 
2014-03-05 01:41:34 PM  

chocolate covered poop: What if the system is not internet connected?  If I'm not checking email or launching browsers, is there really any risk of getting anything on the system to fark it up?


No. Unless you're installing dodgy software.
 
2014-03-05 01:47:03 PM  
Because Free is too difficult of an option.
http://opensuse.org/

http://www.ubuntu.com/

http://www.freebsd.org/
 
2014-03-05 01:48:33 PM  

chocolate covered poop: What if the system is not internet connected?  If I'm not checking email or launching browsers, is there really any risk of getting anything on the system to fark it up?


Maybe if someone brings in something on an infected flash drive when loading something on the system, like what happened with Stuxnet. I could see something like a CNC machine getting infected this way when someone loads the files needed for the job.
 
2014-03-05 01:53:07 PM  

OnlyM3: Because Free is too difficult of an option.
http://opensuse.org/

http://www.ubuntu.com/

http://www.freebsd.org/


Most people and businesses are keeping XP around because they have that ONE specific app that only runs in XP and is not supported in 7 or 8. Recommending that they upgrade to Linux or BSD doesn't really solve for that problem.
 
2014-03-05 01:53:19 PM  
I used XP for a decade and was happy with it but upgrading to 8 when they offered it for £25 was the best thing I did. Once I installed Classic Shell of course.
 
2014-03-05 02:04:14 PM  

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: chocolate covered poop: What if the system is not internet connected?  If I'm not checking email or launching browsers, is there really any risk of getting anything on the system to fark it up?

No. Unless you're installing dodgy software.


memecrunch.com
 
2014-03-05 02:06:57 PM  
How about UPDATE THE shiatTY APPS THAT KEEP YOU STUCK IN XP?

It can be done, and inexpensively. Email me.
 
2014-03-05 02:32:41 PM  

OnlyM3: Because Free is too difficult of an option.
http://opensuse.org/
http://www.ubuntu.com/
http://www.freebsd.org/

some of us use their computers 90% of the time for gaming.

 
JRB
2014-03-05 02:40:30 PM  

Mad_Radhu: OnlyM3: Because Free is too difficult of an option.
http://opensuse.org/

http://www.ubuntu.com/

http://www.freebsd.org/

Most people and businesses are keeping XP around because they have that ONE specific app that only runs in XP and is not supported in 7 or 8. Recommending that they upgrade to Linux or BSD doesn't really solve for that problem.


This is the route I want to take with my due-to-retire XP systems. So which environments do farkers recommend for 1) ancient processors/mobos, and 2) occasional torrents (legal ones, naturally)?
 
2014-03-05 02:52:29 PM  

OnlyM3: Because Free is too difficult of an option.
http://opensuse.org/

http://www.ubuntu.com/

http://www.freebsd.org/


Free software, like free women, is usually expensive. In fact the cheapest date is often the one you pay for ;)

/tip o' the hat to the writer of Jack Reacher
 
2014-03-05 03:10:00 PM  
That list was not only mind-numbingly obvious, it was also factually incorrect in spots.
 
2014-03-05 03:44:27 PM  
Word to the wise for anyone planning to Migrate to Windows 7 in your Office. Might as well go with the Ultimate version if you have users who remote in from home and want to use dual monitors without spanning. New version of RDP client has the "Use all my monitors" feature which only works when connecting "TO" a workstation on Ultimate. Pro only allows spanning and if you do go to Pro and decide later that you want to upgrade to Ultimate, you'll need to do a full install as Windows Anytime/In Place Upgrade is No longer available for Windows 7.
 
2014-03-05 03:48:49 PM  

burnvictim: Word to the wise for anyone planning to Migrate to Windows 7 in your Office. Might as well go with the Ultimate version if you have users who remote in from home and want to use dual monitors without spanning. New version of RDP client has the "Use all my monitors" feature which only works when connecting "TO" a workstation on Ultimate. Pro only allows spanning and if you do go to Pro and decide later that you want to upgrade to Ultimate, you'll need to do a full install as Windows Anytime/In Place Upgrade is No longer available for Windows 7.


Small correction, you can do the in place upgrade but, might as well do the full install as it takes the same amount of time and you may lose settings whereas the anytime upgrade retains all settings and takes about 10 minutes
 
2014-03-05 04:06:59 PM  
Just let it go, man.  XP is dead.  Windows 7 handles 99.9% of the XP apps without issue (in my own experience).  As for large commercial users...I have no sympathy.  The end of the XP life cycle has been well known for quite a while.  There's this thing you can do to avoid being caught in a situation like this, it's called planning.
 
2014-03-05 04:08:57 PM  

Mad_Radhu: OnlyM3: Because Free is too difficult of an option.
http://opensuse.org/

http://www.ubuntu.com/

http://www.freebsd.org/

Most people and businesses are keeping XP around because they have that ONE specific app that only runs in XP and is not supported in 7 or 8. Recommending that they upgrade to Linux or BSD doesn't really solve for that problem.


Virtualbox.  It works with Winodws 7 or Linux.  That's how I handled the few compatibility issues I've had until a better solution came around.
 
2014-03-05 04:11:48 PM  

sethen320: Mad_Radhu: OnlyM3: Because Free is too difficult of an option.
http://opensuse.org/

http://www.ubuntu.com/

http://www.freebsd.org/

Most people and businesses are keeping XP around because they have that ONE specific app that only runs in XP and is not supported in 7 or 8. Recommending that they upgrade to Linux or BSD doesn't really solve for that problem.

Virtualbox.  It works with Winodws 7 or Linux.  That's how I handled the few compatibility issues I've had until a better solution came around.


Or http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/install-and-use-windows-x p -mode-in-windows-7
 
2014-03-05 04:22:36 PM  

dj_spanmaster: How about UPDATE THE shiatTY APPS THAT KEEP YOU STUCK IN XP?

It can be done, and inexpensively. Email me.


That would be great. Please send over the Win8 versions of the software that supports all of our lab instrumentation that the vendors have never made available or have done so, but the hundreds of thousands of dollars we would have to spend make it too cost prohibitive.
 
2014-03-05 04:27:07 PM  

JRB: Mad_Radhu: OnlyM3: Because Free is too difficult of an option.
http://opensuse.org/

http://www.ubuntu.com/

http://www.freebsd.org/

Most people and businesses are keeping XP around because they have that ONE specific app that only runs in XP and is not supported in 7 or 8. Recommending that they upgrade to Linux or BSD doesn't really solve for that problem.

This is the route I want to take with my due-to-retire XP systems. So which environments do farkers recommend for 1) ancient processors/mobos, and 2) occasional torrents (legal ones, naturally)?


define ancient
 
2014-03-05 04:31:34 PM  

Mad_Radhu: OnlyM3: Because Free is too difficult of an option.
http://opensuse.org/

http://www.ubuntu.com/

http://www.freebsd.org/

Most people and businesses are keeping XP around because they have that ONE specific app that only runs in XP and is not supported in 7 or 8. Recommending that they upgrade to Linux or BSD doesn't really solve for that problem.


For a lot of businesses, it's hardware related too. Like you mentioned with the CNC machine, we have a lot of devices that interface to computers using old cards/drivers/interfaces that just aren't compatible with newer motherboards. That's in addition to software that isn't supported on newer OSs. Hell, we have a couple machines connected to NT 4.0 boxes because they can't be upgraded. The vendor can sell us an entirely new machine, but they've stopped supporting the old model because they're just too damn old. In these cases, it's not just a matter of a $100-ish upgrade to win 7 enterprise; it's a matter of $250K+ to get a new CAT scan  / REI microscope / whatever. Planned obsolescence is an overall good thing, but it's always going to be disruptive to some degree.

/Current working solution is an isolated network for the old machines with a bastion bridge to the rest of the network.
 
2014-03-05 04:31:38 PM  

burnvictim: sethen320: Mad_Radhu: OnlyM3: Because Free is too difficult of an option.
http://opensuse.org/

http://www.ubuntu.com/

http://www.freebsd.org/

Most people and businesses are keeping XP around because they have that ONE specific app that only runs in XP and is not supported in 7 or 8. Recommending that they upgrade to Linux or BSD doesn't really solve for that problem.

Virtualbox.  It works with Winodws 7 or Linux.  That's how I handled the few compatibility issues I've had until a better solution came around.

Or http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/install-and-use-windows-x p -mode-in-windows-7


I never liked VirtualPC (pretty much what XP Mode is) to begin with.  It wasn't very robust when it came to things like USB and connectivity.  VirtualBox implements USB access and networking perfectly.  The only thing really lacking is in the available sound card emulation.  That's the only reason I have to keep using DOSBox to play Willie Beamish.  DOSBox works great for that kind of thing but I hate it.
 
2014-03-05 04:34:41 PM  

redmid17: JRB: Mad_Radhu: OnlyM3: Because Free is too difficult of an option.
http://opensuse.org/

http://www.ubuntu.com/

http://www.freebsd.org/

Most people and businesses are keeping XP around because they have that ONE specific app that only runs in XP and is not supported in 7 or 8. Recommending that they upgrade to Linux or BSD doesn't really solve for that problem.

This is the route I want to take with my due-to-retire XP systems. So which environments do farkers recommend for 1) ancient processors/mobos, and 2) occasional torrents (legal ones, naturally)?

define ancient


Join a private tracker.  The speeds are much better and the chances of receiving malware go down.  Not that I would know, I'm just telling you what I heard from someone else.
 
2014-03-05 04:35:45 PM  

sethen320: burnvictim: sethen320: Mad_Radhu: OnlyM3: Because Free is too difficult of an option.
http://opensuse.org/

http://www.ubuntu.com/

http://www.freebsd.org/

Most people and businesses are keeping XP around because they have that ONE specific app that only runs in XP and is not supported in 7 or 8. Recommending that they upgrade to Linux or BSD doesn't really solve for that problem.

Virtualbox.  It works with Winodws 7 or Linux.  That's how I handled the few compatibility issues I've had until a better solution came around.

Or http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/install-and-use-windows-x p -mode-in-windows-7

I never liked VirtualPC (pretty much what XP Mode is) to begin with.  It wasn't very robust when it came to things like USB and connectivity.  VirtualBox implements USB access and networking perfectly.  The only thing really lacking is in the available sound card emulation.  That's the only reason I have to keep using DOSBox to play Willie Beamish.  DOSBox works great for that kind of thing but I hate it.


Yeah, I'll agree VirtualPC isn't really that great but, its free at least.
 
2014-03-05 04:39:22 PM  

burnvictim: sethen320: burnvictim: sethen320: Mad_Radhu: OnlyM3: Because Free is too difficult of an option.
http://opensuse.org/

http://www.ubuntu.com/

http://www.freebsd.org/

Most people and businesses are keeping XP around because they have that ONE specific app that only runs in XP and is not supported in 7 or 8. Recommending that they upgrade to Linux or BSD doesn't really solve for that problem.

Virtualbox.  It works with Winodws 7 or Linux.  That's how I handled the few compatibility issues I've had until a better solution came around.

Or http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/install-and-use-windows-x p -mode-in-windows-7

I never liked VirtualPC (pretty much what XP Mode is) to begin with.  It wasn't very robust when it came to things like USB and connectivity.  VirtualBox implements USB access and networking perfectly.  The only thing really lacking is in the available sound card emulation.  That's the only reason I have to keep using DOSBox to play Willie Beamish.  DOSBox works great for that kind of thing but I hate it.

Yeah, I'll agree VirtualPC isn't really that great but, its free at least.


Just like VirtualBox.
 
2014-03-05 04:40:49 PM  

sethen320: burnvictim: sethen320: burnvictim: sethen320: Mad_Radhu: OnlyM3: Because Free is too difficult of an option.
http://opensuse.org/

http://www.ubuntu.com/

http://www.freebsd.org/

Most people and businesses are keeping XP around because they have that ONE specific app that only runs in XP and is not supported in 7 or 8. Recommending that they upgrade to Linux or BSD doesn't really solve for that problem.

Virtualbox.  It works with Winodws 7 or Linux.  That's how I handled the few compatibility issues I've had until a better solution came around.

Or http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/install-and-use-windows-x p -mode-in-windows-7

I never liked VirtualPC (pretty much what XP Mode is) to begin with.  It wasn't very robust when it came to things like USB and connectivity.  VirtualBox implements USB access and networking perfectly.  The only thing really lacking is in the available sound card emulation.  That's the only reason I have to keep using DOSBox to play Willie Beamish.  DOSBox works great for that kind of thing but I hate it.

Yeah, I'll agree VirtualPC isn't really that great but, its free at least.

Just like VirtualBox.


Guess I'm gonna have to give that a spin. Thanks!
 
2014-03-05 04:47:39 PM  

burnvictim: sethen320: burnvictim: sethen320: burnvictim: sethen320: Mad_Radhu: OnlyM3: Because Free is too difficult of an option.
http://opensuse.org/

http://www.ubuntu.com/

http://www.freebsd.org/

Most people and businesses are keeping XP around because they have that ONE specific app that only runs in XP and is not supported in 7 or 8. Recommending that they upgrade to Linux or BSD doesn't really solve for that problem.

Virtualbox.  It works with Winodws 7 or Linux.  That's how I handled the few compatibility issues I've had until a better solution came around.

Or http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/install-and-use-windows-x p -mode-in-windows-7

I never liked VirtualPC (pretty much what XP Mode is) to begin with.  It wasn't very robust when it came to things like USB and connectivity.  VirtualBox implements USB access and networking perfectly.  The only thing really lacking is in the available sound card emulation.  That's the only reason I have to keep using DOSBox to play Willie Beamish.  DOSBox works great for that kind of thing but I hate it.

Yeah, I'll agree VirtualPC isn't really that great but, its free at least.

Just like VirtualBox.

Guess I'm gonna have to give that a spin. Thanks!


You'll definitely like it more than XP mode.  The ability to just use a memory stick or any other USB peripheral (even license dongles) like normal totally makes it worth the hassle of setting it up.  The best way to make it easy to frequently transfer files is to create a folder dedicated to the guest machine on your host PC and make it a permanent shared folder in VirtualBox.  This makes it a network drive on the guest machine and you can just use that one folder to move files from your host to the guest and the other way around.
 
2014-03-05 04:48:11 PM  
Or you could pop the wireless card.

(I have one 2002 XP lappie my accountant uses left...nothing enters, nothing leaves, save scanned to hell Quickbook data files).
 
2014-03-05 04:59:28 PM  

sethen320: burnvictim: sethen320: burnvictim: sethen320: burnvictim: sethen320: Mad_Radhu: OnlyM3: Because Free is too difficult of an option.
http://opensuse.org/

http://www.ubuntu.com/

http://www.freebsd.org/

Most people and businesses are keeping XP around because they have that ONE specific app that only runs in XP and is not supported in 7 or 8. Recommending that they upgrade to Linux or BSD doesn't really solve for that problem.

Virtualbox.  It works with Winodws 7 or Linux.  That's how I handled the few compatibility issues I've had until a better solution came around.

Or http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/install-and-use-windows-x p -mode-in-windows-7

I never liked VirtualPC (pretty much what XP Mode is) to begin with.  It wasn't very robust when it came to things like USB and connectivity.  VirtualBox implements USB access and networking perfectly.  The only thing really lacking is in the available sound card emulation.  That's the only reason I have to keep using DOSBox to play Willie Beamish.  DOSBox works great for that kind of thing but I hate it.

Yeah, I'll agree VirtualPC isn't really that great but, its free at least.

Just like VirtualBox.

Guess I'm gonna have to give that a spin. Thanks!

You'll definitely like it more than XP mode.  The ability to just use a memory stick or any other USB peripheral (even license dongles) like normal totally makes it worth the hassle of setting it up.  The best way to make it easy to frequently transfer files is to create a folder dedicated to the guest machine on your host PC and make it a permanent shared folder in VirtualBox.  This makes it a network drive on the guest machine and you can just use that one folder to move files from your host to the guest and the other way around.


Info is definitely appreciated. On that note, I've been supporting Windows boxes for the past 9 hours. Time to do something more productive. Beer:30 starts now! Cheers
 
2014-03-05 05:12:40 PM  

sethen320: Mad_Radhu: OnlyM3: Because Free is too difficult of an option.
http://opensuse.org/

http://www.ubuntu.com/

http://www.freebsd.org/

Most people and businesses are keeping XP around because they have that ONE specific app that only runs in XP and is not supported in 7 or 8. Recommending that they upgrade to Linux or BSD doesn't really solve for that problem.

Virtualbox.  It works with Winodws 7 or Linux.  That's how I handled the few compatibility issues I've had until a better solution came around.


CAME HERE TO SAY THIS!
Run virtual box and put windows XP inside it.
TADA
 
2014-03-05 05:21:36 PM  

sethen320: burnvictim: sethen320: burnvictim: sethen320: burnvictim: sethen320: Mad_Radhu: OnlyM3: Because Free is too difficult of an option.
http://opensuse.org/

http://www.ubuntu.com/

http://www.freebsd.org/

Most people and businesses are keeping XP around because they have that ONE specific app that only runs in XP and is not supported in 7 or 8. Recommending that they upgrade to Linux or BSD doesn't really solve for that problem.

Virtualbox.  It works with Winodws 7 or Linux.  That's how I handled the few compatibility issues I've had until a better solution came around.

Or http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/install-and-use-windows-x p -mode-in-windows-7

I never liked VirtualPC (pretty much what XP Mode is) to begin with.  It wasn't very robust when it came to things like USB and connectivity.  VirtualBox implements USB access and networking perfectly.  The only thing really lacking is in the available sound card emulation.  That's the only reason I have to keep using DOSBox to play Willie Beamish.  DOSBox works great for that kind of thing but I hate it.

Yeah, I'll agree VirtualPC isn't really that great but, its free at least.

Just like VirtualBox.

Guess I'm gonna have to give that a spin. Thanks!

You'll definitely like it more than XP mode.  The ability to just use a memory stick or any other USB peripheral (even license dongles) like normal totally makes it worth the hassle of setting it up.  The best way to make it easy to frequently transfer files is to create a folder dedicated to the guest machine on your host PC and make it a permanent shared folder in VirtualBox.  This makes it a network drive on the guest machine and you can just use that one folder to move files from your host to the guest and the other way around.


There is a free version of VMware player as well. It's pretty comparable to VirtualBox, but it seems a little more polished, and it's simpler to install the guest OS Tools in my experience.
 
2014-03-05 05:29:03 PM  

manbart: sethen320: burnvictim: sethen320: burnvictim: sethen320: burnvictim: sethen320: Mad_Radhu: OnlyM3: Because Free is too difficult of an option.
http://opensuse.org/

http://www.ubuntu.com/

http://www.freebsd.org/

Most people and businesses are keeping XP around because they have that ONE specific app that only runs in XP and is not supported in 7 or 8. Recommending that they upgrade to Linux or BSD doesn't really solve for that problem.

Virtualbox.  It works with Winodws 7 or Linux.  That's how I handled the few compatibility issues I've had until a better solution came around.

Or http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/install-and-use-windows-x p -mode-in-windows-7

I never liked VirtualPC (pretty much what XP Mode is) to begin with.  It wasn't very robust when it came to things like USB and connectivity.  VirtualBox implements USB access and networking perfectly.  The only thing really lacking is in the available sound card emulation.  That's the only reason I have to keep using DOSBox to play Willie Beamish.  DOSBox works great for that kind of thing but I hate it.

Yeah, I'll agree VirtualPC isn't really that great but, its free at least.

Just like VirtualBox.

Guess I'm gonna have to give that a spin. Thanks!

You'll definitely like it more than XP mode.  The ability to just use a memory stick or any other USB peripheral (even license dongles) like normal totally makes it worth the hassle of setting it up.  The best way to make it easy to frequently transfer files is to create a folder dedicated to the guest machine on your host PC and make it a permanent shared folder in VirtualBox.  This makes it a network drive on the guest machine and you can just use that one folder to move files from your host to the guest and the other way around.

There is a free version of VMware player as well. It's pretty comparable to VirtualBox, but it seems a little more polished, and it's simpler to install the guest OS Tools in my experience.


Yeah, I forgot about that. I used it for a while but for some reason I endes up switching to Vbox and never looked back. I don't remember why though.
 
2014-03-05 05:29:44 PM  

inglixthemad: OnlyM3: Because Free is too difficult of an option.
http://opensuse.org/

http://www.ubuntu.com/

http://www.freebsd.org/

Free software, like free women, is usually expensive. In fact the cheapest date is often the one you pay for ;)

/tip o' the hat to the writer of Jack Reacher


Linux/BSD based operating systems are top tier server operating systems.

The desktop experience on the other hand is lacking though. The big barriers to a smooth desktop experience are mostly because the environment is very disjointed (What distro are you using? Which desktop environment are you putting on top of it; KDE, gome3, gnome2, XFCE, LXDE etc etc etc), and there is less emphasis on writing commercial level desktop software for Linux/BSD (which distro+desktop do you write it for? How will this make money?)
 
2014-03-05 06:03:22 PM  

redmid17: JRB: Mad_Radhu: OnlyM3: Because Free is too difficult of an option.
http://opensuse.org/

http://www.ubuntu.com/

http://www.freebsd.org/

Most people and businesses are keeping XP around because they have that ONE specific app that only runs in XP and is not supported in 7 or 8. Recommending that they upgrade to Linux or BSD doesn't really solve for that problem.

This is the route I want to take with my due-to-retire XP systems. So which environments do farkers recommend for 1) ancient processors/mobos, and 2) occasional torrents (legal ones, naturally)?

define ancient


286, EGA, Adlib, 1MB RAM, 20 MB MFM HD.
 
2014-03-05 06:21:11 PM  

chocolate covered poop: What if the system is not internet connected?  If I'm not checking email or launching browsers, is there really any risk of getting anything on the system to fark it up?


little to none
esp if you're turn off plug and play USB crap ...

in the end, if you check for viri often enough, who cares

back up your data and why worry.
 
2014-03-05 07:14:22 PM  

sethen320: Mad_Radhu: OnlyM3: Because Free is too difficult of an option.
http://opensuse.org/

http://www.ubuntu.com/

http://www.freebsd.org/

Most people and businesses are keeping XP around because they have that ONE specific app that only runs in XP and is not supported in 7 or 8. Recommending that they upgrade to Linux or BSD doesn't really solve for that problem.

Virtualbox.  It works with Winodws 7 or Linux.  That's how I handled the few compatibility issues I've had until a better solution came around.


Yes, was able to load up old character sheet generators for a tabletop game from long ago using virtual box and my old Win2K disk.
 
2014-03-05 07:48:57 PM  

Gordon Bennett: 286, EGA, Adlib, 1MB RAM, 20 MB MFM HD.


Back before they shuttered the awesome service, TechNet actually still had DOS 6.22 and Windows 3.11 for Workgroups available for download for those that needed them.
 
2014-03-05 07:58:16 PM  

manbart: sethen320: burnvictim: sethen320: burnvictim: sethen320: burnvictim: sethen320: Mad_Radhu: OnlyM3: Because Free is too difficult of an option.
http://opensuse.org/

http://www.ubuntu.com/

http://www.freebsd.org/

Most people and businesses are keeping XP around because they have that ONE specific app that only runs in XP and is not supported in 7 or 8. Recommending that they upgrade to Linux or BSD doesn't really solve for that problem.

Virtualbox.  It works with Winodws 7 or Linux.  That's how I handled the few compatibility issues I've had until a better solution came around.

Or http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/install-and-use-windows-x p -mode-in-windows-7

I never liked VirtualPC (pretty much what XP Mode is) to begin with.  It wasn't very robust when it came to things like USB and connectivity.  VirtualBox implements USB access and networking perfectly.  The only thing really lacking is in the available sound card emulation.  That's the only reason I have to keep using DOSBox to play Willie Beamish.  DOSBox works great for that kind of thing but I hate it.

Yeah, I'll agree VirtualPC isn't really that great but, its free at least.

Just like VirtualBox.

Guess I'm gonna have to give that a spin. Thanks!

You'll definitely like it more than XP mode.  The ability to just use a memory stick or any other USB peripheral (even license dongles) like normal totally makes it worth the hassle of setting it up.  The best way to make it easy to frequently transfer files is to create a folder dedicated to the guest machine on your host PC and make it a permanent shared folder in VirtualBox.  This makes it a network drive on the guest machine and you can just use that one folder to move files from your host to the guest and the other way around.

There is a free version of VMware player as well. It's pretty comparable to VirtualBox, but it seems a little more polished, and it's simpler to install the guest OS Tools in my experience.


I like using VMware on a Windows host, Virtualbox on a Linux host. Have XP installations running on both right now - works great.
 
2014-03-05 07:59:05 PM  
I am not looking forward to a horde of zombies attacking us come April 8...I mean virtually.
 
2014-03-05 08:02:53 PM  

Mad_Radhu: Gordon Bennett: 286, EGA, Adlib, 1MB RAM, 20 MB MFM HD.

Back before they shuttered the awesome service, TechNet actually still had DOS 6.22 and Windows 3.11 for Workgroups available for download for those that needed them.


Those are still on MSDN.  There are some OS's that aren't available anymore for legal reasons; for example, you can't get Windows 2000, or XP without service packs anymore.  This really sucks, because I can't find a checked build of Windows XP anywhere.  Microsoft never made full install disks of checked builds, only service packs.  Checked builds are useful for driver development.
 
2014-03-05 09:19:23 PM  

Gordon Bennett: redmid17: JRB: Mad_Radhu: OnlyM3: Because Free is too difficult of an option.
http://opensuse.org/

http://www.ubuntu.com/

http://www.freebsd.org/

Most people and businesses are keeping XP around because they have that ONE specific app that only runs in XP and is not supported in 7 or 8. Recommending that they upgrade to Linux or BSD doesn't really solve for that problem.

This is the route I want to take with my due-to-retire XP systems. So which environments do farkers recommend for 1) ancient processors/mobos, and 2) occasional torrents (legal ones, naturally)?

define ancient

286, EGA, Adlib, 1MB RAM, 20 MB MFM HD.


That would qualify. I'd say anything pre-p4 at this point would be ancient. His machines probably aren't more than a decade old.
 
2014-03-06 09:55:10 AM  

Gordon Bennett: redmid17: JRB: Mad_Radhu: OnlyM3: Because Free is too difficult of an option.
http://opensuse.org/

http://www.ubuntu.com/

http://www.freebsd.org/

Most people and businesses are keeping XP around because they have that ONE specific app that only runs in XP and is not supported in 7 or 8. Recommending that they upgrade to Linux or BSD doesn't really solve for that problem.

This is the route I want to take with my due-to-retire XP systems. So which environments do farkers recommend for 1) ancient processors/mobos, and 2) occasional torrents (legal ones, naturally)?

define ancient

286, EGA, Adlib, 1MB RAM, 20 MB MFM HD.


Wow, does your wife's vibrator come with a foot treadle? The first rig I ever built was a 386-DX 25 Hz with a 52 Mb HD...but that was state of the art 1990. The last time I worked on a 286 was in the '80s at a newspaper, because they weren't much good for more than typing on Wordperfect 5.0.
 
2014-03-06 02:23:17 PM  
Valiente:  The last time I worked on a 286 was in the '80s at a newspaper, because they weren't much good for more than typing on Wordperfect 5.0.

I had a 286 with CGA, 1MB ram, 20 MB MFM HD with WordPerfect 5.1 in the early 90s that got me through college.  A system with a usable word processor that could also dial up the library is all I needed at the time.
 
2014-03-06 11:05:04 PM  
article says: "Install updated firewall software"

NO, because if there are unfixable exploits discovered in the underlying XP networking software, those bugs will override and bypass any firewall software you try use. The safest route for old operating systems that cannot be updated is to not rely on their internal firewall software at all, and use a separate external device, like any router you can buy now for $50.

Also if you have an old computer with a built-in Wireless that only supports WEP or the original WPA (not WPA2), similarly DO NOT USE IT. Buy an external "wifi extender / bridge" box with a network jack on it, and use WPA2 on the cheap box for your old machine via the wired network cable.

For laptops, this means you're tethered to an external box if you need Internet access, but there really isn't a better solution if the system can't support newer and better wireless security like WPA2.

,

And if at all possible on Windows NT 4, Windows 2000 and Windows XP, STOP using the ADMINSTRATOR account for every day use! On Windows NT, 2000 and XP, the default single-user way to use it is to be the administrator, that can do absolutely anything to their system at any time. This is TERRIBLE for trying to protect your system from malware attacks.

Go into Users and Groups, make a separate Users-group only account (also called Limited in Home edition), and exclusively use that Users/limited account for everything. Rarely use the main Admininistrator account, only for explicitly installing or removing old programs.

As with new Vista/7/8 "User Account Control" where it prompts for permission to do adminly stuff, the Users/Limited account will stop the majority of malware from fully taking over and compromising your entire Windows NT / 2000 / XP machine.

The user/Limited account might still become afflicted by malware, but the malware won't be able to spread any further, and infections can be diagnosed and removed via the separate administrator account, that you now never normally use.

,

However, old crappy software designed for Windows 95/98/Me, does not always like being run as anything other than Administrator.

The old AutoCAD 2000 demanded that user document preferences be written into the registry in "HKey_Local_Machine" which is NEVER supposed to be used this way. So AutoCAD 2000 will often crash or malfunction trying to run it under a Limited account, unless you go into the registry and give AutoCAD 2000 specific permission for any Users to modify those specific HKLM keys that it uses.

IT admin permissions-hacking discussion, to make AutoCAD 2000 work without Administrator privileges on Windows 2000: http://www.tek-tips.com/viewthread.cfm?qid=160201

Similar security breaching bullshiat is also sometimes needed for old programs, giving Users access to what are supposed to be protected, Administrator-write-only Program File directories, or ancient config INI files in the Windows directories -- where generic programs are supposed to NEVER be monkeying around on a regular basis.

We IT / network administrators used to spend SO MUCH TIME battling cruddy old programs written by programmers refusing to update their MSDOS / Windows 95 programming methods, and them demanding too much user access to places they have no business requiring it. There were long discussions dedicated to this sort of security workaround hacking to make programs work.

Even Microsoft's programmers would sometimes ignore the company's own modernized security/design rules regarding this:
http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/windows/en-US/f245241c-bb db -4d4a-aeae-a32e11111fff/kodu-game-lab-crashing-under-nonadmin-user-acc ounts?forum=w7itproui

,

Now, Windows 7 and 8 have additional workarounds (UAC Virtualization) for all this security-breaking bullshiat that old programs used to do, with them demanding write access to what should be protected locations. Windows 7 / 8 have the VirtualStore which allows ancient programs to write/modify in read-only locations without Administrator permissions, and the files they write out are actually stored in a hidden location inside the current logged-on user's account. I believe it also virtualizes registry writes by old programs, to what are supposed to be read-only areas.

User Account Control overview, what it is, how it works:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc772207%28v=ws.10%29.asp x

Rejoice! Far less system security hacking needed by network administrators, trying to make ancient programs work while also trying to keep the system protected as much as possible from malware!

- Dale Mahalko
 
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