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(PC Pro (UK))   New Samsung Chromebook looks like it was designed by your dad, with lots of fake leather and enough useless bloatware to refloat a ship   (pcpro.co.uk) divider line 48
    More: Interesting, Samsung Chromebook, bloatware, Samsung, faux leather, Chrome OS, microSD, screen resolution, collaboration tools  
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3635 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 Mar 2014 at 10:16 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



48 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-03-05 08:39:24 AM  
It's almost like Samsung designed it to appeal to the middle-aged demographic or something.
 
2014-03-05 08:50:34 AM  
I was picking up some toner at Office Depot and the sales guy who wouldn't leave me alone had a lanyard that said, "Ask me about Chromebook."  So I did.  He said, "Don't buy one."  You can't get even those dicks to push them.
 
2014-03-05 10:21:46 AM  
I don't get the whole Chromebook thing. It almost makes sense if you don't give it too much thought but if take even a few seconds to think it over I can't picture any scenario where I'd want to buy one.
 
2014-03-05 10:24:37 AM  
I would be far more interested in a Chromebook if I could connect a Nexus 10 (or future tablet) to one and use it as a second screen.
 
2014-03-05 10:28:15 AM  

RTOGUY: I don't get the whole Chromebook thing. It almost makes sense if you don't give it too much thought but if take even a few seconds to think it over I can't picture any scenario where I'd want to buy one.


They can be nice little machines for putting Linux on. Especially if you, like me, have a bunch of SD cards and USB sticks lying around for when you need some extra storage. I find myself working off a USB 3 stick anywhere I am, so having to do so on my Chromebook doesn't feel like a limitation. Why the hell anyone would want to spend $400 (the price of the 13.3" Samsung from TFA) on one is beyond me, though.
 
2014-03-05 10:32:45 AM  
All the customer angst over 8.1, and this is the best they could come up with to compete? How about a reasonably priced alternative to a Windows laptop, not an overglorified tablet with a keyboard?
 
2014-03-05 10:34:29 AM  
i'm writing this on a retina macbook pro, so i'm getting a kick, etc...
 
2014-03-05 10:44:41 AM  
How dare a tech company not target something at the 18-35 demographic! How are design aesthetics be different amongst different age groups! HOW VERY DARE THEY!
 
2014-03-05 10:48:16 AM  

Bungles: How dare a tech company not target something at the 18-35 demographic! How are design aesthetics be different amongst different age groups! HOW VERY DARE THEY!


Hey, fine.  But I don't have to buy it either.  If someone wants to spend that sort of money for low interoperability, and less functionality than I have on my Galaxy Nexus, then have at it.  Not for me.
 
2014-03-05 10:52:12 AM  

Diogenes: Bungles: How dare a tech company not target something at the 18-35 demographic! How are design aesthetics be different amongst different age groups! HOW VERY DARE THEY!

Hey, fine.  But I don't have to buy it either.  If someone wants to spend that sort of money for low interoperability, and less functionality than I have on my Galaxy Nexus, then have at it.  Not for me.



I'm not in the demographic that buys lawn-blowers or cruiseship holidays, but the fact they appeal to the needs of some doesn't enrage me.
 
2014-03-05 10:56:13 AM  
img.fark.net

But will it fit in my pocket?
 
2014-03-05 11:02:43 AM  
i guess if you like the samsung bloatware on their phones this is up your alley


I should show it to my wife
 
2014-03-05 11:02:48 AM  
I haven't looked too much into it, but I've considered a chromebook as something to bring with me to meetings to take notes and bring up files, etc.

Better than trying to read the shiat I 'write' and better than trying to type on an ipad.
 
2014-03-05 11:13:54 AM  

RTOGUY: I don't get the whole Chromebook thing. It almost makes sense if you don't give it too much thought but if take even a few seconds to think it over I can't picture any scenario where I'd want to buy one.


99% of what my wife does on a computer is in the browser. Got her one for her birthday, and she absolutely loves it. Uses it on and off all day while she's home with the baby... if she ever needs anything more, there's a desktop in the other room.

Of course, that was a refurbished Acer which only cost around $150... no idea why someone would buy this thing.
 
2014-03-05 11:14:29 AM  

loonatic112358: i guess if you like the samsung bloatware on their phones this is up your alley


I should show it to my wife



Low-tech level users often love bloatware, because it often offers basic functionality for many common tasks. Which is probably 80% of the population.
 
2014-03-05 11:15:24 AM  
For that price and specs, you're better off getting an Asus Transformer. The tablet has a detachable keyboard that also doubles the battery life, adds USB ports for mouse/thumbdrive/etc, and an additional SD slot.
 
2014-03-05 11:17:47 AM  

RTOGUY: I don't get the whole Chromebook thing. It almost makes sense if you don't give it too much thought but if take even a few seconds to think it over I can't picture any scenario where I'd want to buy one.


Probably 80% of the users out there who aren't serious gamers can do everything they need on a Chromebook - check e-mail, browse, edit documents, casual games, instant messaging, facebook....

My mom would probably use one of these and never have an issue.
 
2014-03-05 11:29:48 AM  
I have a HP11 chromebook. It is just about the best coffeeshop writing machine I can think of.
/ Has a nice screen. A really nice keyboard. It fits in my messenger bag. It weighs nothing.
// But, then I already used google docs, and I have a desktop at home
/// I also have that ADD procrastination problem, so my ideal writing machine is essentially an electronic typewriter that has internet access
 
2014-03-05 11:30:41 AM  

clkeagle: RTOGUY: I don't get the whole Chromebook thing. It almost makes sense if you don't give it too much thought but if take even a few seconds to think it over I can't picture any scenario where I'd want to buy one.

99% of what my wife does on a computer is in the browser. Got her one for her birthday, and she absolutely loves it. Uses it on and off all day while she's home with the baby... if she ever needs anything more, there's a desktop in the other room.

Of course, that was a refurbished Acer which only cost around $150... no idea why someone would buy this thing.


Yeah, I'm thinking about getting one for my 10-year-old daughter, as she spends tons of time programming Scratch. I guess the bad stuff would surface in a year or two when she inevitably moves on to more advanced toolsets...
 
2014-03-05 11:31:19 AM  

RTOGUY: I don't get the whole Chromebook thing. It almost makes sense if you don't give it too much thought but if take even a few seconds to think it over I can't picture any scenario where I'd want to buy one.


It's for people who want the functionality of a tablet with the user-interface of a laptop. AKA old people who can't figure out touchscreens. If you just want something to check your grandkids' pictures on Facebook and read dubious right-wing forwarded emails on your AOL account, a Chromebook is for you.
 
2014-03-05 11:37:01 AM  

cgraves67: RTOGUY: I don't get the whole Chromebook thing. It almost makes sense if you don't give it too much thought but if take even a few seconds to think it over I can't picture any scenario where I'd want to buy one.

It's for people who want the functionality of a tablet with the user-interface of a laptop. AKA old people who can't figure out touchscreens. If you just want something to check your grandkids' pictures on Facebook and read dubious right-wing forwarded emails on your AOL account, a Chromebook is for you.


Well, them and tons of 20 something developers...

But yeah, if you want a pretty much virus free, no infinite updates, has a real keyboard youtube/facebook surfing experience why not Chromebook?
 
2014-03-05 11:42:29 AM  

FlashHarry: i'm writing this on a retina macbook pro, so i'm getting a kick, etc...


www.essentialparenting.com
 
2014-03-05 11:54:59 AM  
I like my chromebook. It's cheap, lite, and a good word processor. It can play the shiatty little flash games I like. Yeah it can't edit video or install photoshop but that's not the point. It's something I can take into the kitchen to look up recipes. For most users it does pretty much everything going to to anyways on laptop.
 
2014-03-05 12:15:33 PM  

thurstonxhowell: RTOGUY: I don't get the whole Chromebook thing. It almost makes sense if you don't give it too much thought but if take even a few seconds to think it over I can't picture any scenario where I'd want to buy one.

They can be nice little machines for putting Linux on. Especially if you, like me, have a bunch of SD cards and USB sticks lying around for when you need some extra storage. I find myself working off a USB 3 stick anywhere I am, so having to do so on my Chromebook doesn't feel like a limitation. Why the hell anyone would want to spend $400 (the price of the 13.3" Samsung from TFA) on one is beyond me, though.


For $130 maybe. I just don't like the idea of such a limited computer it would be like a buying a car that never leaves 2nd gear but I guess if you never needed to go further than the corner store it could work.
 
2014-03-05 12:17:34 PM  
I have the older Samsung Chromebook. I find it quite useful as a portable word processor (for a chiclet style keyboard, I actually like the feel of typing on it, way more than on my ipad, at least), and for web browsing, especially with the long battery life. If I want to play games or Photoshop, record music, whatever, I have a nice laptop.
 
2014-03-05 12:40:24 PM  
I picked up a Chromebook when I was moving cross country and my desktop was going to be in storage for over a month. I need something to surf the web and watch netflix and hulu. My Mom took it over and loves it. Yes you can buy a fully functional Windows computer for a $100 more but it is going to be twice as heavy. As long as you know the limitations it is a fantastic machine.

Before Chromebook non Windows or Apple based computers were pretty useless. This is not the case with a Chromebook.
 
2014-03-05 12:51:08 PM  

RTOGUY: I don't get the whole Chromebook thing. It almost makes sense if you don't give it too much thought but if take even a few seconds to think it over I can't picture any scenario where I'd want to buy one.


As others have mentioned, they're awesome for simple things.  I've basically replaced my iPad at work with one as a mobile notetaking/email thing, and bought one for home for the family

1) Fast: boots in seconds, quick enough for most web things
2) Reliable- no viruses, no worries with having the kids hit a "bad" website.  You just flash the thing back to factory.  Files (mostly) aren't local so no worries about losing data.
3) Surprisingly good hardware- 8-10 hour battery life, decent keyboard and trackpad.  Weighs almost nothing.  The ASUS I have at home has really good build quality for a $200 device.
4) Cheap, cheap, cheap.  If my kids break it, I'm not out very much.

For those of you typing your response on a $1.2k Macbook Air, are you really doing something on that machine you couldn't do on a Chromebook?
 
2014-03-05 01:03:52 PM  
I see a lot of negative comments on forums from people who can't understand why anyone would want a chromebook, as if those who buy them are technologically ignorant neophytes who are being duped. Personally, I love 'em. They're affordable and light (2.4 lbs), boot up almost instantly, have incredible battery life, and I don't need to worry about viruses/malware/maintenance. Considering that 99% of my computer time is doing email and web browsing, they're perfect for me to lug from meeting to meeting. I can't stand trying to hammer out a paragraph or two email on a tablet, so a chromebook is great for me. If cost were no object, I'd probably go with a macbook air, but the original chromebook is five times cheaper (~$200). And when I need to do heavier work, I can either remote into my desktop or grab a heavier laptop. I can appreciate they're not for everyone, but the hostility to these little guys is surprising to me.
 
2014-03-05 01:29:01 PM  
I've always wanted a laptop made with real corinthian leather.
 
2014-03-05 01:33:14 PM  

FlashHarry: i'm writing this on a retina macbook pro, so i'm getting a kick, etc...  feel smug.


The article had nothing to do with mac.
 
2014-03-05 02:13:02 PM  

Diogenes: I was picking up some toner at Office Depot and the sales guy who wouldn't leave me alone had a lanyard that said, "Ask me about Chromebook."  So I did.  He said, "Don't buy one."  You can't get even those dicks to push them.


---My nephew who is 10 years old (5th grade) brought his school issued Chrome book to me and complained it was slow.  I had to tell him that there is no way to make it faster and that its essentially the same thing as his Mom & Dads phone but with a keyboard and bigger screen.

I think if you want a cheap web surfing device its cheaper to get a used laptop and just install your favorite Linux on it.
 
2014-03-05 02:39:29 PM  
I honestly don't get the reason behind Chromebooks. Sure, they cost less, but that could very well be Google sinking money into the product in the hopes of a return. At the end of the day, you have an OS that's very well integrated with the web, but so are other operating systems.
 
2014-03-05 02:46:58 PM  

RTOGUY: thurstonxhowell: RTOGUY: I don't get the whole Chromebook thing. It almost makes sense if you don't give it too much thought but if take even a few seconds to think it over I can't picture any scenario where I'd want to buy one.

They can be nice little machines for putting Linux on. Especially if you, like me, have a bunch of SD cards and USB sticks lying around for when you need some extra storage. I find myself working off a USB 3 stick anywhere I am, so having to do so on my Chromebook doesn't feel like a limitation. Why the hell anyone would want to spend $400 (the price of the 13.3" Samsung from TFA) on one is beyond me, though.

For $130 maybe. I just don't like the idea of such a limited computer it would be like a buying a car that never leaves 2nd gear but I guess if you never needed to go further than the corner store it could work.


Did you read my post? If you put Linux on it, it's not really limited at all. I can do anything on it that I can do on any Linux machine. Which is basically everything that I can do on a low to midrange laptop of any kind.

Sure, it's not a great gaming machine and it will never be. No cheap laptop is. What it is, though, is a great mobile tool for running Linux natively for light programming tasks. Which is exactly what a whole lot of people who actually use computers for work need. I wish I had such a thing when I was a comp sci undergrad.
 
2014-03-05 02:50:44 PM  

Diogenes: I was picking up some toner at Office Depot and the sales guy who wouldn't leave me alone had a lanyard that said, "Ask me about Chromebook."  So I did.  He said, "Don't buy one."  You can't get even those dicks to push them.


I work for the company - HP or Google paid to give us all lariats. We wore them for about two weeks. I've only sold two Chromebooks that haven't come back due to displeasure by the customer.

I have a Chromebook - my brother gave it to me for Christmas. It's nice. Developed a go-bag around it with a Kindle, the Chromebook, a micro charger, a large cell battery and appropriate cabling and a flash drive, using an old  Wii carry bag (which is cool because it's got a Zelda Hyrule crest on it). Total cost to me: about 30$. it weighs total 4 pounds (the whole bag that is), gives me all the connectivity I need as my big 17" laptop, but if it got run over tomorrow, I'd not have to cry about it.

I can drop it down while working on computers, get relevant files downloaded and on a flash drive, I can fix minor problems with a HD connection kit, can reference documents. It's good for what its good for.
 
2014-03-05 03:31:34 PM  
Personally, if I were looking for a lightweight laptop replacement, I'd rather opt for a Galaxy Note Pro 12.2" with an optional S-Mouse and Bluetooth keyboard. Comes with an Office clone suite, had two quad-core processors (effectively making it an octacore device), and has a 2560x1600 display with 4 million more pixels than Apple's Retina displays.

If anyone would like to give me one when they hit the market, I would be grateful.
 
2014-03-05 03:32:55 PM  
Nix Nightbird:
has two quad-core processors (effectively making it an octacore device),

oops. fixed.
 
2014-03-05 03:44:02 PM  

Diogenes: I was picking up some toner at Office Depot and the sales guy who wouldn't leave me alone had a lanyard that said, "Ask me about Chromebook."  So I did.  He said, "Don't buy one."  You can't get even those dicks to push them.


Buy one if you're a tinkerer and then only specific models.  You can rip out the OS and put on *NIX and tinker with the guts of them; kind of like the old EEE 701 in some respects.
 
2014-03-05 04:43:46 PM  
(shrug) I've got the original Samsung chromebook... I dig it.  I do all my work in drive and docs already, so it's great for taking to meetings instead of lugging my thinkpad.  Battery life is amazing, no moving parts, it's light, good screen, touchpad, and keyboard. And if I break it, who cares?  All my data is stored online and the thing was Bic-Lighter cheap.
 
2014-03-05 04:48:07 PM  

RoxtarRyan: For that price and specs, you're better off getting an Asus Transformer. The tablet has a detachable keyboard that also doubles the battery life, adds USB ports for mouse/thumbdrive/etc, and an additional SD slot.


I had a transformer... it was horribly slow, and the keyboard could never keep up with my typing speed. It was stolen, and I replaced it with a Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 plus a Belkin case with a bluetooth keyboard. It's a million times faster and does everything I need it to do much better than the Asus Transformer did, even in terms of netflx/hulu but especially when it comes to things like office apps.
 
2014-03-05 04:53:15 PM  

melopene: RoxtarRyan: For that price and specs, you're better off getting an Asus Transformer. The tablet has a detachable keyboard that also doubles the battery life, adds USB ports for mouse/thumbdrive/etc, and an additional SD slot.

I had a transformer... it was horribly slow, and the keyboard could never keep up with my typing speed. It was stolen, and I replaced it with a Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 plus a Belkin case with a bluetooth keyboard. It's a million times faster and does everything I need it to do much better than the Asus Transformer did, even in terms of netflx/hulu but especially when it comes to things like office apps.


Which version? My TF200 rocks it out quite well. The TF101.... well, it was the original version with 512MB memory, so it didn't do so well with high def video streaming.
 
2014-03-05 05:01:08 PM  
I'm one of the rare beasts still rocking the netbook.  I have an old AspireOne which is working great (no, not my primary PC).  I tried installing ChromeOS on it a while back and it worked fine but the overall experience was kind of dull.  I missed the familiar applications I had been using and the replacements were "almost, but not quite".  I ended up just putting Win7 back on it.

My AspireOne is an AOA150 but I upgraded the memory to the max and took out the old hard disk to put in a SSD a while back.  I also soldered in the missing PCI-e exapnsion slot.  On Win7 the battery life is probably nowhere near what a Chromebook would have but I have never been let down by it.  Some people complain abiout the small keyboard but you adjust eventually.

I love tinkering with stuff and considered getting a Chromebook to just stomp it and put Linux on it but then I figured it would just be redundant to what I've got in the netbook.  But for someone who doesn't already have anything to begin with I would say it's a pretty good deal if you just kill ChromeOS and put something else on it.
 
2014-03-05 05:05:17 PM  

RoxtarRyan: melopene: RoxtarRyan: For that price and specs, you're better off getting an Asus Transformer. The tablet has a detachable keyboard that also doubles the battery life, adds USB ports for mouse/thumbdrive/etc, and an additional SD slot.

I had a transformer... it was horribly slow, and the keyboard could never keep up with my typing speed. It was stolen, and I replaced it with a Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 plus a Belkin case with a bluetooth keyboard. It's a million times faster and does everything I need it to do much better than the Asus Transformer did, even in terms of netflx/hulu but especially when it comes to things like office apps.

Which version? My TF200 rocks it out quite well. The TF101.... well, it was the original version with 512MB memory, so it didn't do so well with high def video streaming.


It was the Transformer Pad Infinity, I don't have the box handy to check the TF#... I had really high hopes for it, but it was a massive, unusable disappointment.
 
2014-03-05 08:10:14 PM  

mtheadedfool: I see a lot of negative comments on forums from people who can't understand why anyone would want a chromebook, as if those who buy them are technologically ignorant neophytes who are being duped. Personally, I love 'em. They're affordable and light (2.4 lbs), boot up almost instantly, have incredible battery life, and I don't need to worry about viruses/malware/maintenance. Considering that 99% of my computer time is doing email and web browsing, they're perfect for me to lug from meeting to meeting. I can't stand trying to hammer out a paragraph or two email on a tablet, so a chromebook is great for me. If cost were no object, I'd probably go with a macbook air, but the original chromebook is five times cheaper (~$200). And when I need to do heavier work, I can either remote into my desktop or grab a heavier laptop. I can appreciate they're not for everyone, but the hostility to these little guys is surprising to me.


This.

If I want to play a game or two on a Chromebook, there's things like Minecraft or various Linux games on Steam, like Starbound or Don't Starve.

I love Chromebooks. They are great computers to hand off to your retired parents or your little kids, and they are fine little machines to mess around with Linux.  Chromebooks are awesome, and everything that netbooks with the crappy ass Win7 starter should have been. If you're techy enough to install Linux (i.e. not completely useless), then Chromebooks are awesome.

Of course, the new crop of Win8.1 tablets are also pretty dang cheap. I need a Bluetooth keyboard & mouse to actually do things like play games on my Dell venue tablet, but the fact that I can do Skyrim on an 8 inch tablet is also insane.

$250 for a tablet that can do Skyrim AND the full MS Office, or $500 for an iPad that will play Angry Birds. Hmmm. Let me think about that one.

I guess people always can get a Macbook if they're stupid, though.
 
2014-03-05 10:30:03 PM  
Author does not seem to know what "bloatware" is.

/by his logic, having links to Google services means there is Google bloatware "installed"
 
2014-03-05 11:33:48 PM  

moike: (shrug) I've got the original Samsung chromebook... I dig it.  I do all my work in drive and docs already, so it's great for taking to meetings instead of lugging my thinkpad.  Battery life is amazing, no moving parts, it's light, good screen, touchpad, and keyboard. And if I break it, who cares?  All my data is stored online and the thing was Bic-Lighter cheap.


Exactly.  I have an Acer Chromebook, and I like it a lot.  It weighs nothing, and it doesn't even get warm.  It's a great living room machine, especially when paired with a Chromecast.  If you're invested in the Google ecosystem (especially if you're a heavy Drive/Docs user), you'll get a ton of use out of these things for $250.
 
2014-03-06 09:06:11 AM  

legion_of_doo: mtheadedfool: I see a lot of negative comments on forums from people who can't understand why anyone would want a chromebook, as if those who buy them are technologically ignorant neophytes who are being duped. Personally, I love 'em. They're affordable and light (2.4 lbs), boot up almost instantly, have incredible battery life, and I don't need to worry about viruses/malware/maintenance. Considering that 99% of my computer time is doing email and web browsing, they're perfect for me to lug from meeting to meeting. I can't stand trying to hammer out a paragraph or two email on a tablet, so a chromebook is great for me. If cost were no object, I'd probably go with a macbook air, but the original chromebook is five times cheaper (~$200). And when I need to do heavier work, I can either remote into my desktop or grab a heavier laptop. I can appreciate they're not for everyone, but the hostility to these little guys is surprising to me.

This.

If I want to play a game or two on a Chromebook, there's things like Minecraft or various Linux games on Steam, like Starbound or Don't Starve.

I love Chromebooks. They are great computers to hand off to your retired parents or your little kids, and they are fine little machines to mess around with Linux.  Chromebooks are awesome, and everything that netbooks with the crappy ass Win7 starter should have been. If you're techy enough to install Linux (i.e. not completely useless), then Chromebooks are awesome.

Of course, the new crop of Win8.1 tablets are also pretty dang cheap. I need a Bluetooth keyboard & mouse to actually do things like play games on my Dell venue tablet, but the fact that I can do Skyrim on an 8 inch tablet is also insane.

$250 for a tablet that can do Skyrim AND the full MS Office, or $500 for an iPad that will play Angry Birds. Hmmm. Let me think about that one.

I guess people always can get a Macbook if they're stupid, though.


Never really thought about Steam Linux software running on it...

While it is cool to have a Nexus+keyboard (and coming soon, bluetooth mouse), especially now that Google has released the Experience launcher to all Nexus devices, in retrospect for what I needed to do for the money I should have got a Chromebook and a battery pack for my S3. At the very least, maybe a Windows tablet since they come with Microsoft Office. Though as a Google fanboy, I am trying to use Drive/Docs more often.

Also, can Skyrim and other Steam games run on Windows RT? I always thought the OS was very limited in what it could run.
 
2014-03-06 12:08:54 PM  

Electrify: legion_of_doo: mtheadedfool: I see a lot of negative comments on forums from people who can't understand why anyone would want a chromebook, as if those who buy them are technologically ignorant neophytes who are being duped. Personally, I love 'em. They're affordable and light (2.4 lbs), boot up almost instantly, have incredible battery life, and I don't need to worry about viruses/malware/maintenance. Considering that 99% of my computer time is doing email and web browsing, they're perfect for me to lug from meeting to meeting. I can't stand trying to hammer out a paragraph or two email on a tablet, so a chromebook is great for me. If cost were no object, I'd probably go with a macbook air, but the original chromebook is five times cheaper (~$200). And when I need to do heavier work, I can either remote into my desktop or grab a heavier laptop. I can appreciate they're not for everyone, but the hostility to these little guys is surprising to me.

This.

If I want to play a game or two on a Chromebook, there's things like Minecraft or various Linux games on Steam, like Starbound or Don't Starve.

I love Chromebooks. They are great computers to hand off to your retired parents or your little kids, and they are fine little machines to mess around with Linux.  Chromebooks are awesome, and everything that netbooks with the crappy ass Win7 starter should have been. If you're techy enough to install Linux (i.e. not completely useless), then Chromebooks are awesome.

Of course, the new crop of Win8.1 tablets are also pretty dang cheap. I need a Bluetooth keyboard & mouse to actually do things like play games on my Dell venue tablet, but the fact that I can do Skyrim on an 8 inch tablet is also insane.

$250 for a tablet that can do Skyrim AND the full MS Office, or $500 for an iPad that will play Angry Birds. Hmmm. Let me think about that one.

I guess people always can get a Macbook if they're stupid, though.

Never really thought about Steam Linux software running on it ...


Not sure about the games, but the limitations of RT are the main reason I chose to get a laptop/tablet hybrid over a tablet with accessories. Ended up with an HP Split X2, and my only complaint is that it's a bit heavier than it should be.
 
2014-03-06 08:33:35 PM  

FlashHarry: i'm writing this on a retina macbook pro


...which until a week ago was a gaping aluminum security hole. (Still could be.)
 
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