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(NPR)   "Be a chef," they said, "A computer will never replace you"   (npr.org) divider line 84
    More: Cool, computers, supercomputers, chefs, red bell pepper, asparagus  
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10067 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Mar 2014 at 8:35 PM (32 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-04 08:20:00 PM  
The day I eat a computer-generated recipe is the day you know I've given up on humanity.

So several years ago, I guess.
 
2014-03-04 08:36:23 PM  
static3.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-03-04 08:37:16 PM  
I like to see a machine that costs 15 dollars an hour that you can instruct to make anything you want as long as you supply ingredients.
 
2014-03-04 08:38:58 PM  
Chefs can specify a key ingredient and a cuisine, and IBM's computer program will come up with millions of ideas.

How about one good one?
 
2014-03-04 08:40:25 PM  
31.media.tumblr.com
 
2014-03-04 08:41:01 PM  

I can beat it.

and beat it I shall

Bogus.

Seen a lot of kitchens.

And I can tell by the pixels.

 
2014-03-04 08:41:11 PM  
And they won't. Sure a computer might cook something for you, and I won't be at all surprised when they start flipping burgers and dropping fries instead of high school kids. But it will never be a chef.
 
2014-03-04 08:41:27 PM  
But does it talk in a snobby French accent?
 
2014-03-04 08:43:03 PM  

Kevin Lomax: And they won't. Sure a computer might cook something for you, and I won't be at all surprised when they start flipping burgers and dropping fries instead of high school kids. But it will never be a chef.


Are you saying that we will never be able to obtain consciousness in a computer?  Or that chefs are soulless?
 
2014-03-04 08:44:58 PM  

"Are you sure you want to leave me a tip below 20%, Dave?"


berglas.org

 
2014-03-04 08:48:44 PM  
No, dont be a Chef. You'll be happier and have more free time.

/Chef
 
2014-03-04 08:48:51 PM  
Can't wait for Top Chef Computer.
 
2014-03-04 08:49:16 PM  
 At the IBM food truck, chef James Briscione serves up Baltic apple pie - a dish that includes pork loin, apples and garlic chips.

www.weakstream.us
 
2014-03-04 08:51:33 PM  
An allium, a root vegetable, something from the nightshade family, and ground seeds. Go crazy.
 
2014-03-04 08:55:31 PM  
Also, Paging hubiestubert, paging hubiestubert
 
2014-03-04 09:01:50 PM  

Richard C Stanford: But does it talk in a snobby French accent?


Of course!

static2.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-03-04 09:02:05 PM  
"But before I let that supercomputer beat me down, I'm gonna die with a spatula in my hand...."
 
2014-03-04 09:03:33 PM  
i151.photobucket.com
 
2014-03-04 09:04:26 PM  
Spaghetti noodles
Ketchup
I Can't Believe It's Not Butter
 
2014-03-04 09:07:32 PM  
4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-03-04 09:09:35 PM  
Can't beat the authenticity of a real chef, though. Authenticity as in a guy who's constantly pissed, cigarette dangling from his mouth, bottle of whatever always nearby, and coming up with something better than pecan pie farking fries.
 
2014-03-04 09:11:29 PM  

icam: Spaghetti noodles
Ketchup
I Can't Believe It's Not Butter


and cinnamon
 
2014-03-04 09:20:23 PM  
i.imgur.com
 
2014-03-04 09:21:15 PM  

Kevin Lomax: And they won't. Sure a computer might cook something for you, and I won't be at all surprised when they start flipping burgers and dropping fries instead of high school kids. But it will never be a chef.


Really? Never is a long time.
 
2014-03-04 09:23:29 PM  

icam: Spaghetti noodles
Ketchup
I Can't Believe It's Not Butter


That is grim brother.....
 
2014-03-04 09:23:39 PM  
news.nationalgeographic.com

They've re-programmed Watson to serve as a sort of sous-chef that can spit out novel ingredient combinations and recipes on command.

How long before it competes on "Chopped"?
 
2014-03-04 09:28:58 PM  
By "chef" i thought they were talking about something that actually prepares food rather than something that comes up with flavor combinations such as kim chee & peanut butter.

Fancy dishes can involve a lot of fiddly preparation which today is limited by how long the human labor takes. Once robotic manipulative tech advances I expect increasingly elaborate dishes that you wouldn't expect humans alone to duplicate.

One example: Frog Logs - the thigh meat from medium sized frogs (which is fairly tiny) is combined with a thin slice of chili pepper and 3 chives cut to its length. Those are then wrapped in a spinach leaf, which is then coated with Camembert cheese and then every thing wrapped in 5 layers of Filo dough. 40 of these might be an appetizer size portion.

If everything from skinning and extracting the frog meat on was automated then this sort of "labor intensive" dish may become common.
 
2014-03-04 09:32:13 PM  
Not really a Chef, not even a cookbook. Just an ingredient generator.
 
2014-03-04 09:33:18 PM  
4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-03-04 09:36:32 PM  
i.imgur.com
 
2014-03-04 09:43:09 PM  
We're probably still 30-40 years away from robots replacing chefs.  Truck drivers and lettuce pickers have more reason to worry.
 
2014-03-04 09:43:12 PM  
Famous last words?
 
2014-03-04 09:47:55 PM  
i.kinja-img.com
almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea

/what if I crave Zooey?
 
2014-03-04 09:49:48 PM  
Le Cordon Bleu Cheffing School - "A robot will never replace you!"TM
 
2014-03-04 09:52:09 PM  

HairBolus: By "chef" i thought they were talking about something that actually prepares food rather than something that comes up with flavor combinations such as kim chee & peanut butter.

Fancy dishes can involve a lot of fiddly preparation which today is limited by how long the human labor takes. Once robotic manipulative tech advances I expect increasingly elaborate dishes that you wouldn't expect humans alone to duplicate.

One example: Frog Logs - the thigh meat from medium sized frogs (which is fairly tiny) is combined with a thin slice of chili pepper and 3 chives cut to its length. Those are then wrapped in a spinach leaf, which is then coated with Camembert cheese and then every thing wrapped in 5 layers of Filo dough. 40 of these might be an appetizer size portion.

If everything from skinning and extracting the frog meat on was automated then this sort of "labor intensive" dish may become common.


Just because it's difficult to make doesn't mean it tastes good.

A steak is so easy Texans can make it, yet so delicious you pay more for one than a whole meal of other ingredients.
 
2014-03-04 09:53:45 PM  
Here for chef Ramsey yelling at a computer about dry soup.

Waiting patiently....
 
2014-03-04 09:54:53 PM  

doglover: HairBolus: By "chef" i thought they were talking about something that actually prepares food rather than something that comes up with flavor combinations such as kim chee & peanut butter.

Fancy dishes can involve a lot of fiddly preparation which today is limited by how long the human labor takes. Once robotic manipulative tech advances I expect increasingly elaborate dishes that you wouldn't expect humans alone to duplicate.

One example: Frog Logs - the thigh meat from medium sized frogs (which is fairly tiny) is combined with a thin slice of chili pepper and 3 chives cut to its length. Those are then wrapped in a spinach leaf, which is then coated with Camembert cheese and then every thing wrapped in 5 layers of Filo dough. 40 of these might be an appetizer size portion.

If everything from skinning and extracting the frog meat on was automated then this sort of "labor intensive" dish may become common.

Just because it's difficult to make doesn't mean it tastes good.

A steak is so easy Texans can make it, yet so delicious you pay more for one than a whole meal of other ingredients.


While cooking a steak may be easy raising cows to be tasty and butchering them properly is not.
 
2014-03-04 10:02:40 PM  

fusillade762: doglover: HairBolus: By "chef" i thought they were talking about something that actually prepares food rather than something that comes up with flavor combinations such as kim chee & peanut butter.

Fancy dishes can involve a lot of fiddly preparation which today is limited by how long the human labor takes. Once robotic manipulative tech advances I expect increasingly elaborate dishes that you wouldn't expect humans alone to duplicate.

One example: Frog Logs - the thigh meat from medium sized frogs (which is fairly tiny) is combined with a thin slice of chili pepper and 3 chives cut to its length. Those are then wrapped in a spinach leaf, which is then coated with Camembert cheese and then every thing wrapped in 5 layers of Filo dough. 40 of these might be an appetizer size portion.

If everything from skinning and extracting the frog meat on was automated then this sort of "labor intensive" dish may become common.

Just because it's difficult to make doesn't mean it tastes good.

A steak is so easy Texans can make it, yet so delicious you pay more for one than a whole meal of other ingredients.

While cooking a steak may be easy raising cows to be tasty and butchering them properly is not.


It most certainly is. Meat raises itself, if you let it.

And back to frog logs, they don't sound that good. I'd rather have the frog meat on a stick grilled with a bit of salt than in cheesy dough and three chives. Most people must agree, or we'd see more frog and chives pizza.
 
2014-03-04 10:06:25 PM  

T-Servo: [i.kinja-img.com image 200x138]
almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea

/what if I crave Zooey?


Next time it rains, show up at her house with a bucket of tomato soup.
 
2014-03-04 10:13:02 PM  

jso2897: T-Servo: [i.kinja-img.com image 200x138]
almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea

/what if I crave Zooey?

Next time it rains, show up at her house with a bucket of tomato soup.


Ok, I don't get that reference, but I may have a nice dream about it.

/giggity
 
2014-03-04 10:13:59 PM  

Moonk: No, dont be a Chef. You'll be happier and have more free time.

/Chef


I really hope my daughter doesn't choose the industry.

/Chef
 
2014-03-04 10:15:13 PM  
Came for Jetsons, Bender, and maybe something from Sleeper.

2/3 ain't bad.
 
2014-03-04 10:15:36 PM  
Tomorrow's headline:
(Sad) "Be a chef," they said, "A computer will never replace you," they said
 
2014-03-04 10:17:57 PM  
...and then I skimmed the article.

/cut me a break, I'm slacking at work
 
2014-03-04 10:21:32 PM  
The model 35-1011
or H2-b
 
2014-03-04 10:25:23 PM  

That Guy Jeff: [i.imgur.com image 480x384]


Everything needs more essence of flavor.
 
2014-03-04 10:28:02 PM  
Formerly in the culinary world for 8 years and the software development one for almost 20 years, I think that automated cooking is a great idea.  It would make the cooking task more repeatable.   Any properly refined system can eventually beat a human as long as a human is part of the process.    The missing ingredient in cooking is the experience of the cook.  Any tool only quickens this process and improves quality.
 
2014-03-04 10:34:59 PM  

Shrapnel: ...and then I skimmed the article.

/cut me a break, I'm slacking at work


Who isn't?
 
2014-03-04 10:40:28 PM  

doglover: fusillade762: doglover: HairBolus: By "chef" i thought they were talking about something that actually prepares food rather than something that comes up with flavor combinations such as kim chee & peanut butter.

Fancy dishes can involve a lot of fiddly preparation which today is limited by how long the human labor takes. Once robotic manipulative tech advances I expect increasingly elaborate dishes that you wouldn't expect humans alone to duplicate.

One example: Frog Logs - the thigh meat from medium sized frogs (which is fairly tiny) is combined with a thin slice of chili pepper and 3 chives cut to its length. Those are then wrapped in a spinach leaf, which is then coated with Camembert cheese and then every thing wrapped in 5 layers of Filo dough. 40 of these might be an appetizer size portion.

If everything from skinning and extracting the frog meat on was automated then this sort of "labor intensive" dish may become common.

Just because it's difficult to make doesn't mean it tastes good.

A steak is so easy Texans can make it, yet so delicious you pay more for one than a whole meal of other ingredients.

While cooking a steak may be easy raising cows to be tasty and butchering them properly is not.

It most certainly is. Meat raises itself, if you let it.

And back to frog logs, they don't sound that good. I'd rather have the frog meat on a stick grilled with a bit of salt than in cheesy dough and three chives. Most people must agree, or we'd see more frog and chives pizza.


Depends on where you go. Frog legs are fair common in other countries. Fair common in some states. Common enough, that I can lay hands on prepped frog legs without having to skin or do much other than open the box. Then again, so is squirrel for BBQ--which is frippin' delicious--but getting in prepped squirrel is bit more specialty than most purveyors are going for, but you can get dressed rabbit fair easy as well. Frog legs are not quite the pain in tochis to prepare and cook that folks seem to think they are. They are somewhat delicate, but otherwise simplicity is best. And tasty.

Back to the article: this is a nice tool. You get into the kitchen, you see what you have on hand, you take a look at what your purveyors have on special, or what is at hand, or what's in season, or what your grill guy or saute gal has been kvetching to get in, and then you sort of map out what to order. Sometimes that doesn't always come off as well as you hope. You get the wrong item, you get something that isn't quite what you were hoping for, you realize that your predecessor had squirreled away some stuff in the freezer on on the shelves that really eats up space, and then it's time to figure out what to do with the stuff. One of my favorite bits from a movie, was the shark fin soup bit in Eat, Drink, Man, Woman, where the shark fins for the soup just dissolve into brown sludge, and Chou rescues the event. That's what chefs are for. Well, that and actually managing the damn place, crunching the numbers, and someone handy to fix blame to when things go horribly awry. A tool like this is actually kind of appealing. You get inspiration for a variety of sources. You talk with other chefs, you talk with your staff, because they all have different experiences, and even mining their favorite childhood meals, or what their Nana did is good inspiration. You thumb through magazines and cookbooks, and a lot of the time, you don't necessarily use a specific recipe, but it does give you a springboard for what you have on hand, and this is a similar tool. It's a big data base. And one that is a lot more detail oriented, and from the article, far more pointed than just using Google to call up some generic crap that some foodie magazine has plastered on its site.

It's not going to replace the chef by any means. But it does sound like a useful tool, for when the pump is dry, you need some inspiration, and reading up a new recipe doesn't mean that you use the exact one presented--I rarely use specific recipes as presented, because you use what's on hand, and for the professional, the only recipes that you nail down are the ones that you want your crew to reproduce exactly. You get an idea from somewhere else, you use that as a basic framework, and you fill it in with what you have on hand, what you have available from your purveyors, what is local, and you then interpret that recipe. Another springboard that you can look through while having a quick cup of chowder or maybe some coffee, in the down time, or in the morning, all the better. Recipes are inspiration, rather than specifics, except to your staff, who'd best make that marinara the way I damn well expect it to be. You try something you've never done before? You look to a recipe, but even then, you tend to use your experience on processes and ingredients. That's sort of the job. Well, that and getting your distributors to lighten up on the mixing of produce in boxes when they bring that sh*t in, because it's a pain in the ass to find a hidden container of sour cream under twenty pounds of cucumbers.
 
2014-03-04 10:44:12 PM  

hubiestubert: Moonk: No, dont be a Chef. You'll be happier and have more free time.

/Chef

I really hope my daughter doesn't choose the industry.

/Chef


Really? I rather hope mine does. I mean, it doesn't pay sh*t, but it teaches you a lot about life. Sure, the lessons are harsh, rude, and bitter, not to mention pharmaceutically altered, but so is the world we live in. Besides, it's one of the few jobs left where you can step off a bus in any major city in the world and have a job within an hour, without degrading applications, career counseling, or drug testing.

/Sous Chef without the title or pay
 
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