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(PJ Media)   That couple that found $10 million in gold coins? They might not lose 50% to the government. They might lose all of it to the government -- except for a 25% finder's reward   (pjmedia.com) divider line 250
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16344 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Mar 2014 at 6:50 AM (24 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-04 10:52:31 AM
I wonder if the government still has records which confirm that the theft happened. At the moment, we only have one newspaper article which mentions the theft.
 
2014-03-04 10:55:16 AM

WelldeadLink: I wonder if the government still has records which confirm that the theft happened. At the moment, we only have one newspaper article which mentions the theft.


What, you think the coins grew legs and walked out of the mint on their own?
 
2014-03-04 10:55:49 AM

WelldeadLink: I wonder if the government still has records which confirm that the theft happened. At the moment, we only have one newspaper article which mentions the theft.


Even if the gov can't prove it, I'll be that lawyers are currently hunting down the relatives of previous property owners and will prepare claims as well.

Moral of the story:  Attention whoring almost always goes badly.
 
2014-03-04 11:01:47 AM

jpbreon: Gold, real money, and you think the State is going to sit idly by?

The coup de grace will be when the State gives them worthless paper trash in return for their very real, never-been-worth-zero gold.


Because a worthless metal used primarily for jewelry has intrinsic value?
 
2014-03-04 11:07:23 AM

Slaves2Darkness: Yeah, this is why you don't declare finding large sums of money, gold, etc... You quietly go about turning it into assets.


The finders had no clue it belonged to the government, so had no idea the government would try to claim it.

So, here's the method:
1:Find treasure hoard.
2:Travel to Mexico with small coins hidden in various body cavities.
3:Sell coins privately
4:Convert to Dogecoin. Not Bitcoin
5:Profit!
 
2014-03-04 11:09:57 AM

SVenus: Slaves2Darkness: Yeah, this is why you don't declare finding large sums of money, gold, etc... You quietly go about turning it into assets.

The finders had no clue it belonged to the government, so had no idea the government would try to claim it.

So, here's the method:
1:Find treasure hoard.
2:Travel to Mexico with small coins hidden in various body cavities.
3:Sell coins privately
4:Convert to Dogecoin. Not Bitcoin
5:Profit!


They will have a pretty high chance of getting caught if they go through New Mexico so they should plan accordingly.
 
2014-03-04 11:11:18 AM
I see the Party of Rape showed up.

Anybody who posted in here that paying taxes on stuff you found is akin to rape, needs to be spayed or neutered.
 
2014-03-04 11:12:58 AM

MayoSlather: jpbreon: Gold, real money, and you think the State is going to sit idly by?

The coup de grace will be when the State gives them worthless paper trash in return for their very real, never-been-worth-zero gold.

Because a worthless metal used primarily for jewelry has intrinsic value?


Well, gold has some intrinsic value....jewelry, dentistry, electronics.....but you're correct, the money value of gold is derived in much the same way as that of paper money.    BTW, the US dollar derives its value from the government's ability to tax and create debt, and it is, in fact, backed by a commodity much more important than gold: Oil.
 
2014-03-04 11:24:04 AM
Zihuatanejo, Mexico, Baby!


i1180.photobucket.com
 
2014-03-04 11:26:35 AM
Where are people getting this finder's fee from? These folks found 80 million in gold coins stolen from the Philadelphia Mint and they didn't get a single cent back from Uncle Sam

http://www.courthousenews.com/2012/09/04/49923.htm
 
2014-03-04 11:33:31 AM

Ctrl-Alt-Del: Thunderpipes: They need to pay their fair share. That is the liberal thought process, right? How dare they find gold when some people only have an Xbox and a couch?

No, the "liberal" thought process is that they need to return the stolen property to its rightful owner. Do you disagree?


no, judging by the majority of the comments in here, the liberal thought process is to pull a hindsight observation and claim how they're so much smarter than the people that found them, and then how they would have better avoided detection by slowly selling or melting them down.  But, you know, they're not greedy or anything.
 
2014-03-04 11:35:17 AM

mikemil828: Where are people getting this finder's fee from? These folks found 80 million in gold coins stolen from the Philadelphia Mint and they didn't get a single cent back from Uncle Sam

http://www.courthousenews.com/2012/09/04/49923.htm


They didn't find it. Coming across you're relative's hoard in your inheritance wouldn't be considered a find. I'm sure the argument can be made, but I can't see how that argument would win.
 
2014-03-04 11:46:52 AM
I'm surprised nobody's talking about how cool it is that this treasure not only was found but might be connected to a neat historical story.
 
2014-03-04 11:47:35 AM
I was curious, so I turned to the Googles.

There are a number of better articles on this. It seems that these coins have been out and exhibited over the last year with plans to sell some off for the taxes, on Amazon in May. They have also contacted lawyers and accountants.

I'd be surprised that it got this far without already having a few protections in place.
 
2014-03-04 11:47:52 AM
For the math challenged:

"All" =/= 75%
 
2014-03-04 11:48:02 AM

GoldSpider: HindiDiscoMonster: Find treasure.

Step 1: move said treasure out of USA to a country known for protecting it's banking customers (you can afford it now)
Step 2: move your family and assets out of the USA to a country where you can live like emperors till the day you die (that are unlikely to cooperate with US authorities
Step 3: obtain citizenship in new country, and renounce US citizenship
Step 4: with the loudest voice you can muster (no posting on the net) say:

Step 5: Enjoy your new life and fortune.

Yeah step 1 should be the first move after any windfall.


No.. wait for a relative to die, then find the coins in the back of their closet.
 
2014-03-04 11:49:44 AM

SVenus: mikemil828: Where are people getting this finder's fee from? These folks found 80 million in gold coins stolen from the Philadelphia Mint and they didn't get a single cent back from Uncle Sam

http://www.courthousenews.com/2012/09/04/49923.htm

They didn't find it. Coming across you're relative's hoard in your inheritance wouldn't be considered a find. I'm sure the argument can be made, but I can't see how that argument would win.


The government could claim the same thing about this hoard and take the whole thing, it's not like this couple can prove that they found the coins rather than inherited it.
 
2014-03-04 11:54:53 AM

dukeblue219: SpectroBoy: Life_is_a_carnivore: Or they could have laid low and cashed them in one at a time but they had to be attention whores.

Duh.

This.

My very first thought when the story came out was that they were asking for trouble or taxes, or both.

Best bet would be to sell them one at a time at different coin/gold shops.

Again, you cannot slowly convert $10MM worth of extremely valuable gold coins into cash without someone noticing. Furthermore, if you're someone barely getting by and suddenly start acquiring millions in cash the IRS is going to notice. You can't deposit the cash in a bank without drawing attention, and are you really going to buy a new car or new house with cash? Hell I'm not even positive you can sell gold coins worth thousands a piece for cash without generating a govt form somewhere.

The only option would be to sell them so slowly that nobody notices which kind of defeats the purpose of finding a fortune. Even taking a 75% loss and then investing the remainder would be way more practical.


Actually these gold coins are collectibles and not required to issue a 1099 to the Feds.
 
2014-03-04 11:58:35 AM

dk47: GoldSpider: HindiDiscoMonster: Find treasure.

Step 1: move said treasure out of USA to a country known for protecting it's banking customers (you can afford it now)
Step 2: move your family and assets out of the USA to a country where you can live like emperors till the day you die (that are unlikely to cooperate with US authorities
Step 3: obtain citizenship in new country, and renounce US citizenship
Step 4: with the loudest voice you can muster (no posting on the net) say:

Step 5: Enjoy your new life and fortune.

Yeah step 1 should be the first move after any windfall.

No.. wait for a relative to die, then find the coins in the back of their closet.



After a $5.25 million exclusion, you'd owe 40% of what's left....so you would owe only $1.9 in taxes...
 
2014-03-04 12:10:59 PM
This is why you  never say this shiat out loud

First Rule of Maturity: Keep it to yourself
 
2014-03-04 12:16:58 PM

dk47: dukeblue219: SpectroBoy: Life_is_a_carnivore: Or they could have laid low and cashed them in one at a time but they had to be attention whores.

Duh.

This.

My very first thought when the story came out was that they were asking for trouble or taxes, or both.

Best bet would be to sell them one at a time at different coin/gold shops.

Again, you cannot slowly convert $10MM worth of extremely valuable gold coins into cash without someone noticing. Furthermore, if you're someone barely getting by and suddenly start acquiring millions in cash the IRS is going to notice. You can't deposit the cash in a bank without drawing attention, and are you really going to buy a new car or new house with cash? Hell I'm not even positive you can sell gold coins worth thousands a piece for cash without generating a govt form somewhere.

The only option would be to sell them so slowly that nobody notices which kind of defeats the purpose of finding a fortune. Even taking a 75% loss and then investing the remainder would be way more practical.

Actually these gold coins are collectibles and not required to issue a 1099 to the Feds.


Collectibles (28% gain) are reported on 1099-DIV, Box 2d
 
2014-03-04 12:18:58 PM
I'm all for civil disobedience and all, but it sure seems a lot of Farkers think the best course of action when you find a horde of gold is to become a criminal.  Would you choose $2 million free and clear?  Or, would you choose $10 million with a good possibility of going to prison for 10 years and losing it all?  Stolen property, no matter how long ago it was taken, belongs to the original owners or their decedents.  But, I do believe you'd need a lot more proof than a simple newspaper article.

Let's change it up a bit.  Let's say the gold coins were stolen from a little old lady 100 years ago and her family ended up poor and destitute.  Do her decedents deserve the loot or does the finder?  It shouldn't matter who had the items stolen or if they have a sob story, the law should treat everyone the same.  If you think the law should be different just because the government was the victim, then you have the mindset of a douchebag.

Oh, and moving out of the country and renouncing citizenship doesn't absolve you from a crime.  But, thanks for the laugh.
 
2014-03-04 12:36:08 PM
How do they determine which value the finder's fee is based upon?

The $30,000 original theft value?
The $10,000,000 value due to the rarity and condition of the coins?
The $2,000,000 current gold value?
The $900,000 adjusted for inflation value of the original $30,000?

I'm going with the government picking the $30,000 original theft value because government.
 
2014-03-04 01:11:19 PM
I figured the government would do everything possible to steal the gold.  Next up, IRS audit and seizure of their assets.  They'll be lucky to not be murdered by some DEA goons on falsified drug charges
 
2014-03-04 01:45:02 PM

MayoSlather: jpbreon: Gold, real money, and you think the State is going to sit idly by?

The coup de grace will be when the State gives them worthless paper trash in return for their very real, never-been-worth-zero gold.

Because a worthless metal used primarily for jewelry has intrinsic value?


Since Lydia in the 7th century BC, humans have thought so.

The difference between paper and gold is the difference between being told there is value and believing there is value. Paper money has always required people to be told it has value - that is why the change-over to fiat currencies must be done by first issuing certificates redeemable in gold to removing the gold-backing, because people don't automatically assign much value to paper and this gave them a reference point - whereas gold does not.

Gold has been accepted as a currency, never once failing, for close to 3 millenia, where as every single paper currency has eventually failed.

So, too, will the dollar eventually fail. It would have failed before had it not been leveraged as a so-called reserve currency, but eventually it will reduce to the point that not even this can save it.
 
2014-03-04 01:54:49 PM

The_Six_Fingered_Man: dk47: dukeblue219: SpectroBoy: Life_is_a_carnivore: Or they could have laid low and cashed them in one at a time but they had to be attention whores.

Duh.

This.

My very first thought when the story came out was that they were asking for trouble or taxes, or both.

Best bet would be to sell them one at a time at different coin/gold shops.

Again, you cannot slowly convert $10MM worth of extremely valuable gold coins into cash without someone noticing. Furthermore, if you're someone barely getting by and suddenly start acquiring millions in cash the IRS is going to notice. You can't deposit the cash in a bank without drawing attention, and are you really going to buy a new car or new house with cash? Hell I'm not even positive you can sell gold coins worth thousands a piece for cash without generating a govt form somewhere.

The only option would be to sell them so slowly that nobody notices which kind of defeats the purpose of finding a fortune. Even taking a 75% loss and then investing the remainder would be way more practical.

Actually these gold coins are collectibles and not required to issue a 1099 to the Feds.

Collectibles (28% gain) are reported on 1099-DIV, Box 2d


Let's say you buy a collectible gold coin, stick it in your sock drawer, and sell it to the local coin shop 10 years later for a gain?  Who is sending a 1099 to the IRS?

Quite different from purchasing a stock and holding for 10 years. Most likely, they are sending a 1099 for the entire value of the sale of stock.

/not saying you don't have to pay tax
 
2014-03-04 02:14:37 PM

Watubi: I'm all for civil disobedience and all, but it sure seems a lot of Farkers think the best course of action when you find a horde of gold is to become a criminal.  Would you choose $2 million free and clear?  Or, would you choose $10 million with a good possibility of going to prison for 10 years and losing it all?  Stolen property, no matter how long ago it was taken, belongs to the original owners or their decedents.  But, I do believe you'd need a lot more proof than a simple newspaper article.

Let's change it up a bit.  Let's say the gold coins were stolen from a little old lady 100 years ago and her family ended up poor and destitute.  Do her decedents deserve the loot or does the finder?  It shouldn't matter who had the items stolen or if they have a sob story, the law should treat everyone the same.  If you think the law should be different just because the government was the victim, then you have the mindset of a douchebag.

Oh, and moving out of the country and renouncing citizenship doesn't absolve you from a crime.  But, thanks for the laugh.


I agree with you BUT, everyone and his mother is now going to come crawling out to the woodwork to make claims against these people....legitimate or not...it will cost them dearly, and more than money.  They have now entered into a nightmare that will last for years.   I would have melted the shiat down, sold it for scrap, taken my $1.3 million and kept my mouth shut.
 
2014-03-04 02:24:31 PM

jpbreon: MayoSlather: jpbreon:

So, too, will the dollar eventually fail. It would have failed before had it not been leveraged as a so-called reserve currency, but eventually it will reduce to the point that not even this can save it.



and yet there are no countries currently using gold to back their currency.
 
2014-03-04 02:30:45 PM
IIRC the coins found by the couple were minted in the mid 1880's, the robbery of the mint was in 1899 and someone was convicted of said robberyin the early 1900's. So why should they have to give them up?

This article is just all over the place, there is no real proof (yet, if at all) that any of these coins were the same coins taken from the mint in San Francisco.
 
2014-03-04 02:33:27 PM

HooskerDoo: Those coins are so rare I doubt that one could sell them at all without drawing attention.


The problem is you can sell one or even five but NO you can't sell 100 even if spread over time w/o drawing MAJOR attention from the government and everyone else.

The best way to do this on the downlow is probably melt it all down and just make it into multiple gold bars or chunks and sell it off for clean currencies in the black market for a lot lower price BUT in going that route you're also dealing with people in the underworld and that always carries some inherent risk itself.
 
2014-03-04 02:39:29 PM
the terrible part is will they be tax on the finders fees? because if so that would be considered ordinary income and they'll end up with $1.5 mil. Still good since it's basically 'free' $$ but considering the initial amount it must also suck big time
 
2014-03-04 02:44:01 PM

jpbreon: I don't know what to say to people who honestly believe that one side is evil and the other, good.


But I bet that wont stop ya
 
2014-03-04 02:47:41 PM

Isitoveryet: jpbreon: MayoSlather: jpbreon:

So, too, will the dollar eventually fail. It would have failed before had it not been leveraged as a so-called reserve currency, but eventually it will reduce to the point that not even this can save it.


and yet there are no countries currently using gold to back their currency.


Of course not. Gold does not allow the printing authorities to expand the money base at will. You can't simply conjure up more gold. You would have to find it, mine it, and so forth. Paper, on the other hand - more accurately, a few zeros added by a computer - can be created for next to nothing. This process is inflation, the hidden tax, by which purchasing power can be reduced from everyone holding the currency to the people who print money. This is why counterfeiting is one of three crimes listed in the Constitution.

Gold meant that spending had to be done over the table, so to speak. The only way to expand government, make war, enrich friends, etc, was to tax it from the citizenry. The citizens then would shove their fist through the collective face of the government elites. Paper money made it possible to do all these things without the citizens understanding or even detecting it.

This is why governments love paper currency, and why paper currencies always fail. The temptation to devalue the currency for one's benefit is simply too much for humans to resist.
 
2014-03-04 02:54:34 PM

TerminalEchoes: Satanic_Hamster: Don't click on derp cites.


How do you know it's a derp site? Daily Kos said so?
 
2014-03-04 03:02:31 PM

jpbreon: Isitoveryet: jpbreon: MayoSlather: jpbreon:

So, too, will the dollar eventually fail. It would have failed before had it not been leveraged as a so-called reserve currency, but eventually it will reduce to the point that not even this can save it.


and yet there are no countries currently using gold to back their currency.

Of course not. Gold does not allow the printing authorities to expand the money base at will. You can't simply conjure up more gold. You would have to find it, mine it, and so forth. Paper, on the other hand - more accurately, a few zeros added by a computer - can be created for next to nothing. This process is inflation, the hidden tax, by which purchasing power can be reduced from everyone holding the currency to the people who print money. This is why counterfeiting is one of three crimes listed in the Constitution.

Gold meant that spending had to be done over the table, so to speak. The only way to expand government, make war, enrich friends, etc, was to tax it from the citizenry. The citizens then would shove their fist through the collective face of the government elites. Paper money made it possible to do all these things without the citizens understanding or even detecting it.

This is why governments love paper currency, and why paper currencies always fail. The temptation to devalue the currency for one's benefit is simply too much for humans to resist.


I love paper currency too, I wouldn't be able to compete with or accumulate existing wealth if we still only valued gold. there simply isn't enough of it to go around & that leaves a majority of it in the hands of the already wealthy (family money) and the gov't (who own majority of un-mined lands).

and do you believe that holding it in reserve keeps the value of gold inflated? I liken it to banks sitting on several properties in any given neighborhood, they don't want to flood the market & reduce home value so they sit on properties, keeping the value artificial, and trickle out their assets to make the largest returns.
think how many more poor citizens there would be if gold was still the currency of choice
 
2014-03-04 03:13:24 PM

dk47: The_Six_Fingered_Man: dk47: dukeblue219: SpectroBoy: Life_is_a_carnivore: Or they could have laid low and cashed them in one at a time but they had to be attention whores.

Duh.

This.

My very first thought when the story came out was that they were asking for trouble or taxes, or both.

Best bet would be to sell them one at a time at different coin/gold shops.

Again, you cannot slowly convert $10MM worth of extremely valuable gold coins into cash without someone noticing. Furthermore, if you're someone barely getting by and suddenly start acquiring millions in cash the IRS is going to notice. You can't deposit the cash in a bank without drawing attention, and are you really going to buy a new car or new house with cash? Hell I'm not even positive you can sell gold coins worth thousands a piece for cash without generating a govt form somewhere.

The only option would be to sell them so slowly that nobody notices which kind of defeats the purpose of finding a fortune. Even taking a 75% loss and then investing the remainder would be way more practical.

Actually these gold coins are collectibles and not required to issue a 1099 to the Feds.

Collectibles (28% gain) are reported on 1099-DIV, Box 2d

Let's say you buy a collectible gold coin, stick it in your sock drawer, and sell it to the local coin shop 10 years later for a gain?  Who is sending a 1099 to the IRS?

Quite different from purchasing a stock and holding for 10 years. Most likely, they are sending a 1099 for the entire value of the sale of stock.

/not saying you don't have to pay tax


The coin shop has the responsibility to prepare and file the 1099-DIV and send it to the IRS.

And yes, it is quite different than selling a stock. Which is probably why the two sales are reported on different forms. Stock sales are reported on 1099-B.
 
2014-03-04 03:22:54 PM
Allow me to explain the proper procedure for this sort of situation

1.  Find coins.
2.  Shut your damn mouth.
3.  Trade/sell/etc the coins one at a time as you need money.
4.  Shut your damn mouth.
5.  Better call Saul.
 
2014-03-04 03:58:20 PM

Bad_Seed: But, but GOLD. How can government take? FIAT currency! RON PAUL!


Wow, you're stupid.
 
2014-03-04 04:03:25 PM

Pangea: Life_is_a_carnivore: Or they could have laid low and cashed them in one at a time but they had to be attention whores.

Duh.

$30,000 worth of gold coins at face value is 1500-$20 gold pieces, which weigh an ounce each.

1500 ounces of gold at today's prices is worth just over $2 million.

These coins are worth 5x as much as a set, due to the collector value.

Coincidentally, 25% of $10 million is STILL $500,000 more than they're worth by weight.


And,  one could argue they only owe the government the original amount stolen/missing. ~ $30,000

I personally would have a hard time destroying those coins for obvious reasons, but your mileage may vary.

Plus, you have a cool story to tell people and get to do the talk show circuit and make some more cash with your 15 minutes of fame.
 
2014-03-04 04:10:52 PM

Gentoolive: Bad_Seed: But, but GOLD. How can government take? FIAT currency! RON PAUL!

Wow, you're stupid.


He's just ridiculing the Paulestinians. Is your sarcasm meter completely broken?
 
2014-03-04 04:15:22 PM

Watubi: Let's change it up a bit.  Let's say the gold coins were stolen from a little old lady 100 years ago and her family ended up poor and destitute.  Do her decedents deserve the loot or does the finder?  It shouldn't matter who had the items stolen or if they have a sob story, the law should treat everyone the same.  If you think the law should be different just because the government was the victim, then you have the mindset of a douchebag.


If a criminal stole $100 from a Federally Insured Bank 20 years ago, does the restitution request account for inflation of the value of the original $100?

Why does any restitution have to be the actual items? If it was paper money in tatters, that would be one thing.
If these were coins heavily weathered by stream flooding over time, it's another.
These coins were preserved perfectly, and the government wants the perfect coins in return?

Why not sell the coins at market to collectors and buy the government their own cheaper used coins in return?

Again, the assumption that the government is going to take coins that used to be in vaults and sell them to collectors is funny.  Probably has been done before, but it's still rather funny.

//Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm going to go to my closet and dig out the 1964 proof set still encased in the original plastic and go wonder what it'll fetch on the open market
 
2014-03-04 05:14:06 PM
Isitoveryet:
I love paper currency too, I wouldn't be able to compete with or accumulate existing wealth if we still only valued gold. there simply isn't enough of it to go around & that leaves a majority of it in the hands of the already wealthy (family money) and the gov't (who own majority of un-mined lands).

and do you believe that holding it in reserve keeps the value of gold inflated? I liken it to banks sitting on several properties in any given neighborhood, they don't want to flood the market & reduce home value so they sit on properties, keeping the value artificial, and trick ...


Gold's relative price can rise and fall, just as it does now. Its properties - namely that it is easily divisible and can be measured accurately - mean that each unit of gold will rise and fall, as well. If you had 100 units of gold, that were valued at 1000 dollars (using dollars as a generic unit) and removed 10 units of gold from circulation, the value doesn't change. What happens is each year, as the GDP rises, each unit of gold rises as well/ People who save their units of gold will experience a RISE in their purchasing power! This encourages responsible saving, and encourages lending, as the unit of gold you load will be repaid in a unit of gold with more purchasing power.

Of course, this is offset slightly by any new gold dug up and entering the economy.
 
2014-03-04 05:40:45 PM
The $30,000 stolen from the mint was paid back by Superintendent  Leach of the mint with some donations also made by employees. The mint has no claim.

More importantly, these coins have nothing to do with the mint theft.
 
2014-03-04 06:30:25 PM
yeah, an expensive lesson to learn, keeping your mouth shut

could have had ten million as they needed it
stupid farks
 
2014-03-04 06:51:03 PM
i.imgur.com
 
2014-03-04 06:51:25 PM

bk3k: Allow me to explain the proper procedure for this sort of situation

1.  Find coins.
2.  Shut your damn mouth.
3.  Trade/sell/etc the coins one at a time as you need money.
4.  Shut your damn mouth.
5.  Better call Saul.


Yeah, I would change that up a bit.

1. Find coins
2. Shut your damn mouth
3. Call Saul, who has connections to a reliable fence
4. Pay a few finders fees of your own
5. Walk away with $5-$8million
6. Shut your damn mouth
 
2014-03-04 06:59:00 PM
Said it before, will say it again: the only person they should have told about their find was a really good tax attorney.
 
2014-03-04 10:39:42 PM
Actually they should only pay tax on the face value of the currency

taxes on 28K

problem solved
 
2014-03-04 10:41:18 PM

mr_larry: The $30,000 stolen from the mint was paid back by Superintendent  Leach of the mint with some donations also made by employees. The mint has no claim.

More importantly, these coins have nothing to do with the mint theft.


This is Fark, you are not allowed to present facts here
 
2014-03-04 10:57:29 PM

SVenus: If a criminal stole $100 from a Federally Insured Bank 20 years ago, does the restitution request account for inflation of the value of the original $100?

Why does any restitution have to be the actual items? If it was paper money in tatters, that would be one thing.
If these were coins heavily weathered by stream flooding over time, it's another.
These coins were preserved perfectly, and the government wants the perfect coins in return?

Why not sell the coins at market to collectors and buy the government their own cheaper used coins in return?

Again, the assumption that the government is going to take coins that used to be in vaults and sell them to collectors is funny.  Probably has been done before, but it's still rather funny.


There's apparently a big overlap between "people who think the government is the devil" and "people who don't understand law very well". Imagine that.

Does anyone really suppose that finding a cache of coins, then having someone fish out a newspaper report from around the same time of a theft of about (but not exactly) the same amount and type of coins, somehow constitutes legal proof of identity between what was found and what was stolen?

//Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm going to go to my closet and dig out the 1964 proof set still encased in the original plastic and go wonder what it'll fetch on the open market

Well, unfortunately, it's pretty much worth silver value. There are an awful lot of the things floating around. If you've got the "accented hair" type (Google it), it's worth a bit more, and if it's an exceptionally nice specimen it can go fairly high -- but such nice specimens are extremely rare. (That's why they cost more.)
 
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