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(Deadline)   Netflix CEO $ay$ the company'$ deci$ion to make a deal with Comca$t wa$ done $olely to "improve $ub$criber experience" and had nothing to do with making money hand over fi$t   (deadline.com) divider line 59
    More: Followup, CEO, Netflix, DVD rental, CFO David Wells, potential game  
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1689 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 03 Mar 2014 at 8:40 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-03 08:36:56 PM  
Oh, no, Netflix might want to make money? How dare they.

Shut the fark up, submitter. It's a farking business, and they are awesome and worth every penny.
 
2014-03-03 08:42:55 PM  
It's almost like Netflix had an interest in not being hamstrung by a greedy ISP.
 
2014-03-03 08:46:20 PM  
i.imgur.com
 
2014-03-03 08:50:19 PM  
Normally when people accuse someone of being greedy, it's not for the act of spending more money to provide better service to their customers.

Is subby 'tarded?
 
2014-03-03 08:51:28 PM  
Or it nothing to do with the fact that if they hadn't cut that deal, Comcast-NBC-Universal-Time Warner would have bent them so far over the barrel it would have broken them in half.
 
2014-03-03 08:51:52 PM  
I really hate how profit keeps getting equated with evilness. Short-sighted profiting at the expense of long term growth, stable business, and treating your customers right sure, but profit in general? They are a company, they have to make some profit or be diverting revenue into growth (like Amazon). If someone makes a good product and treats me well, charging a reasonable price, I hope they make money.
 
2014-03-03 08:52:38 PM  
Look, I get that you don't like them capitulating to those shiatty farks. but ponying up so their subscribers don't get pissed and leave does not make them greedy.
 
2014-03-03 08:54:10 PM  

Mentat: Or it nothing to do with the fact that if they hadn't cut that deal, Comcast-NBC-Universal-Time Warner would have bent them so far over the barrel it would have broken them in half.


What will probably happen down the road is that Comcast will end up buying Netflix and then we'll all be paying a lot more for "entertainment."
 
2014-03-03 08:56:21 PM  
Oh, and obligatory (and NSFW, language)
 
2014-03-03 09:00:30 PM  
How long before Comcast is able to offer you their own gateway straight into Netflix for only 5 bucks extra a month?  That is where Netflix is heading.  Bundled in with your cable bill.
 
2014-03-03 09:02:16 PM  
I wonder how long until Netflix starts playing commercials during shows, like hulu.  start with 15 seconds, increase to 30 seconds, then a minute, then 2 minutes then perhaps longer now?  I dont know, I stopped watching Hulu because of it.
 
2014-03-03 09:03:28 PM  

theflatline: How long before Comcast is able to offer you their own gateway straight into Netflix for only 5 bucks extra a month?  That is where Netflix is heading.  Bundled in with your cable bill.


Highly doubt it would be for just five bucks a month.
 
2014-03-03 09:08:56 PM  

LessO2: theflatline: How long before Comcast is able to offer you their own gateway straight into Netflix for only 5 bucks extra a month?  That is where Netflix is heading.  Bundled in with your cable bill.

Highly doubt it would be for just five bucks a month.


How about $12.99, integrated in the STB, with an expanded selection that's really mostly b&w movies.
 
2014-03-03 09:10:30 PM  
And then Netflix will die.
 
2014-03-03 09:12:14 PM  

LessO2: theflatline: How long before Comcast is able to offer you their own gateway straight into Netflix for only 5 bucks extra a month?  That is where Netflix is heading.  Bundled in with your cable bill.

Highly doubt it would be for just five bucks a month.


Yeah, who'd be dumb enough to pay $5 extra a month for something that's already free?

/[looks around nervously, whistles]
 
2014-03-03 09:19:05 PM  
The fallout from the idiotic net neutrality ruling begins...
 
2014-03-03 09:24:39 PM  

DamnYankees: Oh, no, Netflix might want to make money? How dare they.

Shut the fark up, submitter. It's a farking business, and they are awesome and worth every penny.


Agreed.
 
2014-03-03 09:24:51 PM  

oukewldave: I wonder how long until Netflix starts playing commercials during shows, like hulu.  start with 15 seconds, increase to 30 seconds, then a minute, then 2 minutes then perhaps longer now?  I dont know, I stopped watching Hulu because of it.


Yeah, I JUST signed up for a free month netflix trial after being a hardcore pirate for the last 20 years or so. Audio keeps going out of synch with video (while hardwired in to a university network), the compression causes frames to jump around and everything goes blocky... It's seriously like I'm watching a poorly coded mpg on a computer from 1999.

Oh, and at home, I'm on comcast, so my service should be great now, right?

I'm a grown ass man (with a near-middle age growing ass).  I am happy to pay for decent service.  I am happy to pay for shiat I can get for free if it's convenient enough.  But if you make it terrible service that's inconvenient... nope
I do like jumping from pc to xbox to ps3 to tablet to 3ds though... that's nice.
 
2014-03-03 09:32:57 PM  

ThatGuyOverThere: oukewldave: I wonder how long until Netflix starts playing commercials during shows, like hulu.  start with 15 seconds, increase to 30 seconds, then a minute, then 2 minutes then perhaps longer now?  I dont know, I stopped watching Hulu because of it.

Yeah, I JUST signed up for a free month netflix trial after being a hardcore pirate for the last 20 years or so. Audio keeps going out of synch with video (while hardwired in to a university network), the compression causes frames to jump around and everything goes blocky... It's seriously like I'm watching a poorly coded mpg on a computer from 1999.

Oh, and at home, I'm on comcast, so my service should be great now, right?

I'm a grown ass man (with a near-middle age growing ass).  I am happy to pay for decent service.  I am happy to pay for shiat I can get for free if it's convenient enough.  But if you make it terrible service that's inconvenient... nope
I do like jumping from pc to xbox to ps3 to tablet to 3ds though... that's nice.


in the settings uncheck the hd box if your connection cannot handle it, and the audio and video will sync.
 
2014-03-03 09:34:21 PM  
So the internets (and fark) do not understand how peering relationships work.  News at 11.

/yawn
 
2014-03-03 09:39:20 PM  

ThatGuyOverThere: Yeah, I JUST signed up for a free month netflix trial after being a hardcore pirate for the last 20 years or so. Audio keeps going out of synch with video (while hardwired in to a university network), the compression causes frames to jump around and everything goes blocky... It's seriously like I'm watching a poorly coded mpg on a computer from 1999.

Oh, and at home, I'm on comcast, so my service should be great now, right?


This is a problem on your end I think, not Netflix. I've literally never had a syncing problem with Netflix, nor have I ever had frame rate issues.
 
2014-03-03 09:43:33 PM  
This is a nice article that analyzes the Netflix and Comcast deal without all of the hysteria most of the blogosphere has had about it.

"I have seen people suggest that Comcast will pull a bait-and-switch on Netflix and raise rates or not deliver good quality video now that they have them locked in a contract. That's a lame argument as Netflix isn't a bunch of dummies, they are anything but. It's the whole reason why Netflix signed a multi-year deal and, this is really important to note, Netflix is getting an install SLA, packet loss SLA and latency SLA from Comcast, which guarantees quality. This is very different from what Netflix was getting from Cogent because Comcast is providing fully dedicated capacity, unlike sending it through someone like Cogent where those connections are potentially over-subscribed if a transit provider over-sells their capacity, which Cogent has a history of doing."

"To date, Cogent has had peering disputes with AOL, Teleglobe, France Telecom, Level 3, TeliaSonera, Sprint-Nextel and Verizon. I find it interesting no one in the press mentioned how Cogent always seems to be the one major transit provider who continues to have disputes with so many other network providers, year after year."

I honestly find it funny that Cogent was probably the source of all the problems with Netflix streaming, but Comcast got all the blame.
 
2014-03-03 09:44:07 PM  

ThatGuyOverThere: being a hardcore pirate for the last 20 years or so.


ThatGuyOverThere: I am happy to pay for decent service.


Uhh
 
2014-03-03 09:46:15 PM  
Just like healthcare, food, home heating oil and education, Netflix should be free.
 
2014-03-03 09:46:21 PM  

Actual Farking: ThatGuyOverThere: being a hardcore pirate for the last 20 years or so.

ThatGuyOverThere: I am happy to pay for decent service.

Uhh


Even Blackbeard can appreciate a busty wench when he sees one.
 
2014-03-03 09:50:40 PM  
Copied from another thread I posted in:

Netflix recently paid Comcast an unspecific amount (though in the millions) for undeterred access to their service. The last thing that should be happening is exactly what Netflix did with Comcast: Pay them to use their network. I absolutely see Netflix increasing the cost of their service in the coming year (and to mask it so it doesn't appear as if it targets specific users, it will be a price increase made to everyone regardless of their ISP). What trend does this set? Now, Netflix is in possible talks with Verizon (and AT&T from what I hear) to pay them also for unthrottled speed? The ISP's, though publicly stating that they aren't throttling Netflix, are regardless accepting million dollar contracts to ensure that they don't have problems in the future? The ISPs are either lying, or setting up YOUR internet service that YOU already pay for to have a price increase to access "premium" content that you can already access.

What this does is have a two-pronged effect:

First, ISPs may very well start charging every website for unthrottled access, otherwise, their accessibility to the average consumer will be noticeably degraded, or perhaps even cut-off if it isn't included in their 'a la carte' pricing. Do you think many websites have the profitability to pay Verizon *AND* Comcast *AND* AT&T *AND* Charter *AND* Cox *AND* Brighthouse (etc. ad nauseum) millions to ensure their access isn't throttled? Do you have a friend who owns a construction website that he uses to promote his business? Do you think he has the money to buy his good favor at the ISPs? What about your friend from work who runs a side company selling household goods... can she take such a hit from her profits to ensure that the ISPs let people see her website? What about your local church, do you think they have pockets deep enough to keep their website stay up and running? What about your favorite local or regional band who uses their site to promote gigs and sell merchandise?

The second problem this creates is that is dissuades smaller content providers from getting into the business. Companies will simply say that it isn't worth it, since they can't afford to pay the fees to the ISPs. Imagine there is a big business who sells widgets who pays the mob for protection, and although there is someone else who can provide a better widget, they can't afford to pay the mob, so the mob makes sure that the access to that store is as inconvenient as possible. Netflix is setting the bar to ensure that no other startup can go reasonably act as competition to them when it comes to accessing their content without throttling or any other obstruction. They are ensuring that they can become what the ISPs are, a monopoly when it comes to providing an online video service. This stifles innovation, job creation and the free market, especially since if your ISP has fees set so high that the smaller competitor can not pay for them, ISP can simply not to provide access (or gives degraded access), and to top it off *you do NOT have a choice for your ISP*. You want a different competitive ISP, you literally need to move where you live. How the hell is that a "free market" solution?

THIS is why Net Neutrality is necessary. Not only do you, as well as the content providers, have to pay more to access their sites, but it isn't even like you have a real competitive option to your primary carrier. The person who ends up paying the most is you, the end consumer.

You pay more to have your access and options removed. This is the future of the internet should we continue down this path.
 
2014-03-03 10:09:10 PM  

Actual Farking: ThatGuyOverThere: being a hardcore pirate for the last 20 years or so.

ThatGuyOverThere: I am happy to pay for decent service.

Uhh


It's still real to me.  I will download the crap out of music, but when a band comes to town I'll go to their show and buy a few CDs from their merch table so they get a bigger cut of the money (and then just stick with my illegal mp3s).  I download the crap out of movies, but I have hundreds and hundreds of dvd/hddvd/bluray of movies that I actually liked enough to buy. I hack all my game consoles so i can demo games on the fly, but I still have piles and piles of legit games dating back to SNES in my backlog.  Etc.
I have a short attention span, so I don't much enjoy paying full price for games/music that I'll run through for 10 minutes and then get bored with. If something keeps my attention, I'll go superfan on it and pay for extra.
 
2014-03-03 10:16:10 PM  
They should spend the money on getting more dvds and streaming rights.
 
2014-03-03 10:16:12 PM  

RoxtarRyan: Copied from another thread I posted in:

Netflix recently paid Comcast an unspecific amount (though in the millions) for undeterred access to their service. The last thing that should be happening is exactly what Netflix did with Comcast: Pay them to use their network. I absolutely see Netflix increasing the cost of their service in the coming year (and to mask it so it doesn't appear as if it targets specific users, it will be a price increase made to everyone regardless of their ISP). What trend does this set? Now, Netflix is in possible talks with Verizon (and AT&T from what I hear) to pay them also for unthrottled speed? The ISP's, though publicly stating that they aren't throttling Netflix, are regardless accepting million dollar contracts to ensure that they don't have problems in the future? The ISPs are either lying, or setting up YOUR internet service that YOU already pay for to have a price increase to access "premium" content that you can already access.

What this does is have a two-pronged effect:

First, ISPs may very well start charging every website for unthrottled access, otherwise, their accessibility to the average consumer will be noticeably degraded, or perhaps even cut-off if it isn't included in their 'a la carte' pricing. Do you think many websites have the profitability to pay Verizon *AND* Comcast *AND* AT&T *AND* Charter *AND* Cox *AND* Brighthouse (etc. ad nauseum) millions to ensure their access isn't throttled? Do you have a friend who owns a construction website that he uses to promote his business? Do you think he has the money to buy his good favor at the ISPs? What about your friend from work who runs a side company selling household goods... can she take such a hit from her profits to ensure that the ISPs let people see her website? What about your local church, do you think they have pockets deep enough to keep their website stay up and running? What about your favorite local or regional band who uses their site to promote gigs and sell merchandise?

The second problem this creates is that is dissuades smaller content providers from getting into the business. Companies will simply say that it isn't worth it, since they can't afford to pay the fees to the ISPs. Imagine there is a big business who sells widgets who pays the mob for protection, and although there is someone else who can provide a better widget, they can't afford to pay the mob, so the mob makes sure that the access to that store is as inconvenient as possible. Netflix is setting the bar to ensure that no other startup can go reasonably act as competition to them when it comes to accessing their content without throttling or any other obstruction. They are ensuring that they can become what the ISPs are, a monopoly when it comes to providing an online video service. This stifles innovation, job creation and the free market, especially since if your ISP has fees set so high that the smaller competitor can not pay for them, ISP can simply not to provide access (or gives degraded access), and to top it off *you do NOT have a choice for your ISP*. You want a different competitive ISP, you literally need to move where you live. How the hell is that a "free market" solution?

THIS is why Net Neutrality is necessary. Not only do you, as well as the content providers, have to pay more to access their sites, but it isn't even like you have a real competitive option to your primary carrier. The person who ends up paying the most is you, the end consumer.

You pay more to have your access and options removed. This is the future of the internet should we continue down this path.


Netflix is actually the winner in this one though. They have been trying to get a peering agreement with Comcast for a long time and they have been pushing their Open Connect program hard with ISPs before the whole recent dust up even happened. If anything Netflix actually played Comcast by raising public sentiment against them prior to the TW deal, when they need to look like a friendly monopoly.

Plus if they do the deals right, they save money overall with the peering deals. Yes, they have to pay Comcast, but they don't buy web bandwidth for a flat rate. They no longer have to pay Limelight or Cogent for the bandwidth going to Comcast customers, so it is either revenue neutral or it is saving them a bundle long term (and if it wasn't saving them money why would they even start the Open Connect program in the first place).

Also, all the examples you give are small companies that are never going to be doing bandwidth on a scale that is going to cause them to need to enter a peering agreement. The framer that builds your house or your local church is going to have someone like Squarespace hosting their sites or they will use something like AWS for a backend, and the little bit of traffic they have isn't going to be enough to run it I the congestion issues Netflix had. Plus, it is easy for even individual users to get set up using cheap services like AWS, and even use Amazon Cloudfront as a CDN for literally dollars a month if you are doing the type of low bandwidth streaming like a small town business would be doing, and then let Amazon do the heavy lifting of making sure your bits get there smoothly. Comcast May be big, but they are not big enough to intimidate someone like Amazon.
 
2014-03-03 10:29:21 PM  
In fact, the more I think about it, the more I suspect Netflix pulled some Frank Underwood level shenanigans with Comcast. They wanted an Open Connect deal, Comcast didn't want to play, then they moved over to Cogent knowing they were a cheap CDN that would drop the ball with Comcast and create a bottleneck in the system. Comcast got blamed in the press, who were chomping at the bit for a victim of anti-net neutrality practices, which put pressure on Comcast to make an Open Connect deal because they had antitrust regulators eyeing their merger and customers screaming at their tech support about crap Netflix quality.

Maybe I've got it all wrong, but I have to wonder if the conventional wisdom about this was completely backwards and Netflix made Comcast their little biatch by exploiting the distrust that everyone has about the big cable companies these days.
 
2014-03-03 10:39:58 PM  

ThatGuyOverThere: oukewldave: I wonder how long until Netflix starts playing commercials during shows, like hulu.  start with 15 seconds, increase to 30 seconds, then a minute, then 2 minutes then perhaps longer now?  I dont know, I stopped watching Hulu because of it.

Yeah, I JUST signed up for a free month netflix trial after being a hardcore pirate for the last 20 years or so. Audio keeps going out of synch with video (while hardwired in to a university network), the compression causes frames to jump around and everything goes blocky... It's seriously like I'm watching a poorly coded mpg on a computer from 1999.

Oh, and at home, I'm on comcast, so my service should be great now, right?

I'm a grown ass man (with a near-middle age growing ass).  I am happy to pay for decent service.  I am happy to pay for shiat I can get for free if it's convenient enough.  But if you make it terrible service that's inconvenient... nope
I do like jumping from pc to xbox to ps3 to tablet to 3ds though... that's nice.


Most Universities throttle high bandwidth traffic, such as Netflix and torrents.
 
2014-03-03 10:57:30 PM  

Mad_Radhu: Maybe I've got it all wrong, but I have to wonder if the conventional wisdom about this was completely backwards and Netflix made Comcast their little biatch by exploiting the distrust that everyone has about the big cable companies these days.


Honestly? Judging by the history of actions large companies have taken, very VERY few do anything for the good of the customer, since they don't answer to customers, they answer to shareholders. If Comcast did get farked in this deal, we should expect someone high up to get fired or forced to resign over it very soon. Just like if Netflix did somehow pull the wool over Comcast, I have no doubt that it was to make them look bad, since you can do that without forking over millions.

The one company who has does anything in recent memory of telling the shareholders (ok, shareholder singular) to fark off when it came to doing something to decrease costs/increase profit was Apple, and for that, massive kudos to them. But damn near every other large company out there simply doesn't care about their customers. I can't stress that enough. Comcast doesn't need to care about their customers, since 99% of the time they have no other choice for high-speed access.
 
2014-03-03 11:07:12 PM  

Mad_Radhu: In fact, the more I think about it, the more I suspect Netflix pulled some Frank Underwood level shenanigans with Comcast. They wanted an Open Connect deal, Comcast didn't want to play, then they moved over to Cogent knowing they were a cheap CDN that would drop the ball with Comcast and create a bottleneck in the system. Comcast got blamed in the press, who were chomping at the bit for a victim of anti-net neutrality practices, which put pressure on Comcast to make an Open Connect deal because they had antitrust regulators eyeing their merger and customers screaming at their tech support about crap Netflix quality.

Maybe I've got it all wrong, but I have to wonder if the conventional wisdom about this was completely backwards and Netflix made Comcast their little biatch by exploiting the distrust that everyone has about the big cable companies these days.


I agree with you.

However, as I stated before in a post, not only does this get them access to Comcast pipes but as I said in my earlier post what is to stop Comcast and Netflix allowing customer to bundle Netflix right in with the Comcast boxes.

Or what is to stop Comcast and other carriers from bundling netflix with broadband only households.

"And if you sign up through NetFlix through Comcast, we guarantee you get it for 5-7 bucks a month for the first year and we take that on to your bill, hell we we let you try it for three months through our special Netflix Comcast frontend, no Roku or extra equipment needed."

Another poster scoffed at my idea because my price, while be it low, was to make a point.

Comcast with TWC have 30 million broadband customers and imagine they could tap that market by bundling.  I see all the other providers cutting this type of deal as well.

It would take next flix to the next level.
 
2014-03-03 11:17:35 PM  

RoxtarRyan: Mad_Radhu: Maybe I've got it all wrong, but I have to wonder if the conventional wisdom about this was completely backwards and Netflix made Comcast their little biatch by exploiting the distrust that everyone has about the big cable companies these days.

Honestly? Judging by the history of actions large companies have taken, very VERY few do anything for the good of the customer, since they don't answer to customers, they answer to shareholders. If Comcast did get farked in this deal, we should expect someone high up to get fired or forced to resign over it very soon. Just like if Netflix did somehow pull the wool over Comcast, I have no doubt that it was to make them look bad, since you can do that without forking over millions.

The one company who has does anything in recent memory of telling the shareholders (ok, shareholder singular) to fark off when it came to doing something to decrease costs/increase profit was Apple, and for that, massive kudos to them. But damn near every other large company out there simply doesn't care about their customers. I can't stress that enough. Comcast doesn't need to care about their customers, since 99% of the time they have no other choice for high-speed access.


Yes, but like I said, Netflix put Comcast in a bad position going into the Time Warner merger and got them into their Open Connect program. That is a HUGE win for Netflix long term, because it takes care of a lot of bandwidth issues they were having and locks in their pricing for a period of years, basically protecting them from any further shenanigans from a huge competitor on the content side. With more people pulling the plug on cable, Comcast is destined to decline over the next few years while Netflix and others like Amazon and Google become stronger competitors. Now is basically their high water mark, and their power is going to wane surprising quickly, especially if HBO ever starts offering unbundled HBO Go subscriptions. The way I see it, Netflix stared down Comcast, and Comcast blinked. Long term I think this whole event is the actually the beginning of the end for big cable, because Netflix is only going to become a bigger and bigger content provider, especially with the Marvel shows launching next year. There's a REASON Comcast drug their heels on Open Connect previously.
 
2014-03-03 11:28:07 PM  

theflatline: Mad_Radhu: In fact, the more I think about it, the more I suspect Netflix pulled some Frank Underwood level shenanigans with Comcast. They wanted an Open Connect deal, Comcast didn't want to play, then they moved over to Cogent knowing they were a cheap CDN that would drop the ball with Comcast and create a bottleneck in the system. Comcast got blamed in the press, who were chomping at the bit for a victim of anti-net neutrality practices, which put pressure on Comcast to make an Open Connect deal because they had antitrust regulators eyeing their merger and customers screaming at their tech support about crap Netflix quality.

Maybe I've got it all wrong, but I have to wonder if the conventional wisdom about this was completely backwards and Netflix made Comcast their little biatch by exploiting the distrust that everyone has about the big cable companies these days.

I agree with you.

However, as I stated before in a post, not only does this get them access to Comcast pipes but as I said in my earlier post what is to stop Comcast and Netflix allowing customer to bundle Netflix right in with the Comcast boxes.

Or what is to stop Comcast and other carriers from bundling netflix with broadband only households.

"And if you sign up through NetFlix through Comcast, we guarantee you get it for 5-7 bucks a month for the first year and we take that on to your bill, hell we we let you try it for three months through our special Netflix Comcast frontend, no Roku or extra equipment needed."

Another poster scoffed at my idea because my price, while be it low, was to make a point.

Comcast with TWC have 30 million broadband customers and imagine they could tap that market by bundling.  I see all the other providers cutting this type of deal as well.

It would take next flix to the next level.


If Comcast did that, though, it would go down like IBM giving Microsoft the keys to the PC kingdom. By getting Netflix more customers and associating Netflix with TV for them, they basically would be accelerating the switch of people away from cable networks to on demand streaming via Netflix, and destroying the profitable TV business they have. It would be a hugely dangerous move, especially with how eager customers are to jump ship now because they hate their cable companies so much.
 
2014-03-03 11:40:53 PM  

Mad_Radhu: theflatline: Mad_Radhu: In fact, the more I think about it, the more I suspect Netflix pulled some Frank Underwood level shenanigans with Comcast. They wanted an Open Connect deal, Comcast didn't want to play, then they moved over to Cogent knowing they were a cheap CDN that would drop the ball with Comcast and create a bottleneck in the system. Comcast got blamed in the press, who were chomping at the bit for a victim of anti-net neutrality practices, which put pressure on Comcast to make an Open Connect deal because they had antitrust regulators eyeing their merger and customers screaming at their tech support about crap Netflix quality.

Maybe I've got it all wrong, but I have to wonder if the conventional wisdom about this was completely backwards and Netflix made Comcast their little biatch by exploiting the distrust that everyone has about the big cable companies these days.

I agree with you.

However, as I stated before in a post, not only does this get them access to Comcast pipes but as I said in my earlier post what is to stop Comcast and Netflix allowing customer to bundle Netflix right in with the Comcast boxes.

Or what is to stop Comcast and other carriers from bundling netflix with broadband only households.

"And if you sign up through NetFlix through Comcast, we guarantee you get it for 5-7 bucks a month for the first year and we take that on to your bill, hell we we let you try it for three months through our special Netflix Comcast frontend, no Roku or extra equipment needed."

Another poster scoffed at my idea because my price, while be it low, was to make a point.

Comcast with TWC have 30 million broadband customers and imagine they could tap that market by bundling.  I see all the other providers cutting this type of deal as well.

It would take next flix to the next level.

If Comcast did that, though, it would go down like IBM giving Microsoft the keys to the PC kingdom. By getting Netflix more customers and associating Netflix with TV for ...


I work for AT&T and I think the powers that be have seen the writing on the wall as far as traditional cable TV dying out.  Th Uverse network is not really being expanded and neither is the traditional broadband, but everything going to wireless and the content to be delivered that way, I think everything is going to go a la carte in the next 10 years.

We even sold off Uverse rights in CT to another company.  And the money from the sales is being used on the wireless side.

I do not think it would be like giving the keys to the candy store, but I can imagine a Special Comcast/Netflix for Comcast customer only could have access to special Comcast content, all that NBC Universal Content.

Also, Netflix cutting this deal with Comcast, gets them closer to that content for future deals.
 
2014-03-03 11:48:08 PM  

DamnYankees: Oh, no, Netflix might want to make money? How dare they.

Shut the fark up, submitter. It's a farking business, and they are awesome and worth every penny.


Screw Netflix. I was a loyal customer up until 4 years ago or so when they decided to raise the cost of their service overnight by 50% and think I was going to take it.

Sent their CEO a letter and told them to shove it.

I have alternatives and I was never going to accept that.
 
2014-03-03 11:52:35 PM  

jmr61: Screw Netflix. I was a loyal customer up until 4 years ago or so when they decided to raise the cost of their service overnight by 50% and think I was going to take it.


Whine more.
 
2014-03-03 11:59:21 PM  
But...

But...

I already pay my ISP for my Internet service.

And I pay Netflix for content.

Why the fark are my Netflix dollars getting kicked back to my ISP? My pipe's paid for; gimme bandwidth you dissembling farkwads.

I thought the whole point of peering was that money only rarely need change hands.

Damn net neutrality was killed in the manger?
 
2014-03-04 12:47:14 AM  
Netflix and cable companies should just be grateful that anyone is still even willing to pay them anything considering what they provide is available for free.
 
2014-03-04 12:55:53 AM  

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Netflix and cable companies should just be grateful that anyone is still even willing to pay them anything considering what they provide is available for free.


House of Cards isn't free. You just have some freeloaders who are too cheap to pay $8 a month pirating it while others pay for the series to get made. Yeah, I guess it is kind of clever to get other people to pay for your entertainment, but being too cheap to pay for Netflix isn't exactly something to brag about in my opinion.

/Hey pirate if you want, but bragging about it is just tacky in my opinion
 
2014-03-04 12:59:39 AM  

Mad_Radhu: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Netflix and cable companies should just be grateful that anyone is still even willing to pay them anything considering what they provide is available for free.

House of Cards isn't free. You just have some freeloaders who are too cheap to pay $8 a month pirating it while others pay for the series to get made. Yeah, I guess it is kind of clever to get other people to pay for your entertainment, but being too cheap to pay for Netflix isn't exactly something to brag about in my opinion.

/Hey pirate if you want, but bragging about it is just tacky in my opinion


And Orange is the New Black made me channel my inner lesbo.
 
2014-03-04 01:10:19 AM  
I've read a lot about this and I still can't shake the feeling that Netflix was shaken down.
 
2014-03-04 02:34:27 AM  

jmr61: DamnYankees: Oh, no, Netflix might want to make money? How dare they.

Shut the fark up, submitter. It's a farking business, and they are awesome and worth every penny.

Screw Netflix. I was a loyal customer up until 4 years ago or so when they decided to raise the cost of their service overnight by 50% and think I was going to take it.

Sent their CEO a letter and told them to shove it.

I have alternatives and I was never going to accept that.


I'm sure Reed Hastings lies awake at night wondering what he could have possibly done differently to keep a customer that is too cheap to spend $8/month for unlimited library access.  I bet you also complained about how you could never find enough good movies and shows while you were a "loyal customer."

/content is extremely, extremely expensive
 
2014-03-04 04:01:11 AM  

DamnYankees: Oh, no, Netflix might want to make money? How dare they.

Shut the fark up, submitter. It's a farking business, and they are awesome and worth every penny.


Yeah but it's Comcast. You'd have better luck selling the "improve subscriber experience" line if you teamed up with an autistic thirty year old with a ham radio and a bag of cats. Nobody's got a problem with wanting to make money but the constant transparent lying is tiresome and insulting. Until people cut that shiat out, they deserve to be mocked.
 
2014-03-04 06:12:03 AM  

oukewldave: I wonder how long until Netflix starts playing commercials during shows, like hulu.  start with 15 seconds, increase to 30 seconds, then a minute, then 2 minutes then perhaps longer now?  I dont know, I stopped watching Hulu because of it.


I didn't the same thing
 
2014-03-04 06:27:56 AM  

shanrick: [i.imgur.com image 500x514]



came for this guy.
 
2014-03-04 07:09:27 AM  
I did the same thing.
 
2014-03-04 07:37:56 AM  

theflatline: How long before Comcast is able to offer you their own gateway straight into Netflix for only 5 bucks extra a month?  That is where Netflix is heading.  Bundled in with your cable bill.


If by "Bundled with" you mean "only available as part of a tier filled with crap you don't want" then I bet it won't be long. Tiers and packages are the entire reason I cut the cord in the first place.

/so, how do I drive my entire internet connection through a vpn? Do I need a gateway computer between everything on the network and the modem?
 
2014-03-04 09:23:50 AM  

Far Cough: But...

But...

I already pay my ISP for my Internet service.

And I pay Netflix for content.

Why the fark are my Netflix dollars getting kicked back to my ISP? My pipe's paid for; gimme bandwidth you dissembling farkwads.

I thought the whole point of peering was that money only rarely need change hands.

Damn net neutrality was killed in the manger?


Netflix needs to pay somebody to carry their bandwidth. Previously, they were paying Cogent to reach Comcast customers.  Now they're paying Comcast.  Nothing has changed except for the company carrying the data.

And the reason peering works without money changing hands is because the amount of data being uploaded and downloaded is roughly the same.  With Netflix, it's not, because their downstream demands are much higher than their upstream demands.  So now they've cut out the middleman and gone straight to Comcast to deliver their content.  This is a much smaller deal than most people are making it out to be.
 
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