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(Brattleboro Reformer)   They USED to laugh and call him names   (reformer.com) divider line 38
    More: Sick, Santa Claus, Brattleboro  
•       •       •

21255 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Mar 2014 at 6:13 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



38 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-03-03 06:17:05 PM  
No felony charge? Bastards.
 
2014-03-03 06:17:37 PM  
"Satan" mispelled again?
 
2014-03-03 06:19:20 PM  
Creepiest Santa ever.
 
2014-03-03 06:26:14 PM  
Get ready for the SLAY RIDE!!!
 
2014-03-03 06:28:09 PM  
 
2014-03-03 06:36:23 PM  
Serial killer Elf?
 
2014-03-03 06:39:09 PM  
Farging iceholes?
 
2014-03-03 06:41:16 PM  
MaudlinMutantMollusk, yes I did steal it, and I'm very sorry.

(not THAT sorry, though)
 
2014-03-03 06:41:33 PM  
Well, Christmas IS over.

Stew anyone?
 
2014-03-03 06:47:32 PM  
"The harsh winter has taken its to......aww hell, the caretaker is heroin junkie"
 
2014-03-03 06:49:24 PM  
I hate local articles like this. Which farking state are we laughing at this time?
 
2014-03-03 06:49:47 PM  

strangeluck: No felony charge? Bastards.


Oh come on, they did give them a "care and feeding plan".  Isn't that enough?
Now that the owners know that they actually have to FEED the animals, I'm sure it will all be fine.
 
2014-03-03 06:53:51 PM  
OMG! After years of frustration and being laughed at by Upper Management, Mister Ferocious Wolf finally snapped and went on a killing spree!

i1.ytimg.com

Of course, the cops will blame it all on the Ice Cream Bunny instead, thanks to his priors.
 
2014-03-03 06:58:35 PM  
A+ headline. Would LOL again.
 
2014-03-03 06:59:07 PM  
i14.photobucket.com
I'm dreaming of a RED CHRISTMAS
 
2014-03-03 07:02:19 PM  
 
2014-03-03 07:19:01 PM  
L O L S U B B Y
 
2014-03-03 07:20:33 PM  

strangeluck: No felony charge? Bastards.


Just thinking about the legal precedents that would set makes my head hurt. These were animals in the care of a business, and through alleged neglect, some of the animals died. When I think about the effects of punishing a business in that situation, I have to think about how that precedent scales up to larger, only slightly different businesses. The article talks about "deer", but it doesn't specify what type, which leaves it open to interpretation as white-tailed deer. Now, in the state of Texas, all individuals of white-tailed deer are considered property of the state, which enables the state to enforce it's hunting laws. However, a very common business here in TX is high-fenced game ranches, where a population of deer are fenced off in, essentially, a gigantic enclosure, and people pay significant amounts of money to go there and hunt those deer. Because of that, those businesses work hard to improve the deer herds in their enclosures, commonly by bringing in superior breeding animals, paying large sums for them. The deer are managed and manipulated very much like livestock, yet they remain the legal property of the state. It doesn't matter if that prize breeding buck they paid several grand for finds a hole in the fence, wanders in front of another hunter on an adjacent property, and gets shot. The game ranch is SOL in that situation. Now, let's think about if a ranch's water supply was lost, if all it's natural water elements like creeks, ponds and rivers ran dry, and the ranch wasn't able to supply enough water to keep their deer alive, and their resident population collapsed. Would that be that different from these Santa's land yahoos who didn't feed their deer, who you say should have felonies charged against them? It's an interesting, slightly scary thought. I don't really have much skin in the game there, as I don't own, work for, or hunt on those ranches, but they do represent a significant part of the economy of southern TX, and a legal precedent of that nature could potentially be fairly damaging to that.
 
2014-03-03 07:30:14 PM  
"In an unrelated case, Deistler was arrested on Feb. 4 by the Bellows Falls Police Department, allegedly in possession of 20 bags of heroin"

Enough said.
 
2014-03-03 07:30:43 PM  

PolyHatSnake: strangeluck: No felony charge? Bastards.

Just thinking about the legal precedents that would set makes my head hurt. These were animals in the care of a business, and through alleged neglect, some of the animals died. When I think about the effects of punishing a business in that situation, I have to think about how that precedent scales up to larger, only slightly different businesses. The article talks about "deer", but it doesn't specify what type, which leaves it open to interpretation as white-tailed deer. Now, in the state of Texas, all individuals of white-tailed deer are considered property of the state, which enables the state to enforce it's hunting laws. However, a very common business here in TX is high-fenced game ranches, where a population of deer are fenced off in, essentially, a gigantic enclosure, and people pay significant amounts of money to go there and hunt those deer. Because of that, those businesses work hard to improve the deer herds in their enclosures, commonly by bringing in superior breeding animals, paying large sums for them. The deer are managed and manipulated very much like livestock, yet they remain the legal property of the state. It doesn't matter if that prize breeding buck they paid several grand for finds a hole in the fence, wanders in front of another hunter on an adjacent property, and gets shot. The game ranch is SOL in that situation. Now, let's think about if a ranch's water supply was lost, if all it's natural water elements like creeks, ponds and rivers ran dry, and the ranch wasn't able to supply enough water to keep their deer alive, and their resident population collapsed. Would that be that different from these Santa's land yahoos who didn't feed their deer, who you say should have felonies charged against them? It's an interesting, slightly scary thought. I don't really have much skin in the game there, as I don't own, work for, or hunt on those ranches, but they do represent a significant part of the economy of ...


sabotage
 
2014-03-03 07:35:16 PM  
The night Santa went crazy?
 
2014-03-03 07:51:49 PM  
yes Subby, headline was good without trying too hard

nicely balanced
well done
 
2014-03-03 08:01:04 PM  

Chariset: MaudlinMutantMollusk, yes I did steal it, and I'm very sorry.

(not THAT sorry, though)


Hell, if I'd submitted it it would have gone red. I have the kiss of death on submissions lately

/glad you got the green :)
 
2014-03-03 08:04:32 PM  
s30.postimg.org
 
2014-03-03 08:31:14 PM  

reillan: The night Santa went crazy?


Can't take a step without standing in reindeer guts
 
2014-03-03 08:46:12 PM  
I SWEAR if I was 18 this would be a road trip!!!!
 
2014-03-03 08:55:43 PM  
It doesn't seem like 20 bags of smack would be enough to fill all the requests Santa gets.Typical drug bust! (Tipster reports 2000 pounds of heroin, deputies confiscate the 1000 pounds, sheriff's office announces the confiscation of the 100 pounds, Santa is prosecuted for posession of the 20 bags. Ho ho ho!)
 
2014-03-03 09:04:05 PM  

bigbobowski: I SWEAR if I was 18 this would be a road trip!!!!


maybe your mom will still let you go, you just have to ask

;-p
 
2014-03-03 09:22:50 PM  

strangeluck: No felony charge? Bastards.


Now let's be fair to the people involved. TFA is scant on details.

Situations in which a citation for animal cruelty is warranted, but felony charges are not: Rapid weather changes resulting in death, allowing patrons to feed non-feed items to animals, making inadequate shelter due to lack of knowledge of the animal's habitat, I could go on.

What actually killed these animals? Without knowing that, I don't think anyone can pass judgement on the park's owners.
 
2014-03-03 09:39:54 PM  

PolyHatSnake: strangeluck: No felony charge? Bastards.

Just thinking about the legal precedents that would set makes my head hurt. These were animals in the care of a business, and through alleged neglect, some of the animals died. When I think about the effects of punishing a business in that situation, I have to think about how that precedent scales up to larger, only slightly different businesses. The article talks about "deer", but it doesn't specify what type, which leaves it open to interpretation as white-tailed deer. Now, in the state of Texas, all individuals of white-tailed deer are considered property of the state, which enables the state to enforce it's hunting laws. However, a very common business here in TX is high-fenced game ranches, where a population of deer are fenced off in, essentially, a gigantic enclosure, and people pay significant amounts of money to go there and hunt those deer. Because of that, those businesses work hard to improve the deer herds in their enclosures, commonly by bringing in superior breeding animals, paying large sums for them. The deer are managed and manipulated very much like livestock, yet they remain the legal property of the state. It doesn't matter if that prize breeding buck they paid several grand for finds a hole in the fence, wanders in front of another hunter on an adjacent property, and gets shot. The game ranch is SOL in that situation. Now, let's think about if a ranch's water supply was lost, if all it's natural water elements like creeks, ponds and rivers ran dry, and the ranch wasn't able to supply enough water to keep their deer alive, and their resident population collapsed. Would that be that different from these Santa's land yahoos who didn't feed their deer, who you say should have felonies charged against them? It's an interesting, slightly scary thought. I don't really have much skin in the game there, as I don't own, work for, or hunt on those ranches, but they do represent a significant part of the economy of ...



I do understand your point, and it's a very good one. It's just the animal lover in me being angry at the way defenseless animals were treated. As far as hunting for entertainment, I personally hate that animals are hunted for sport, but I know it's part of life and it's nothing that will change.

Since you used Texas as an example, Texas does have a felony animal cruelty law  http://www.spca.org/page.aspx?pid=316  and it's meant more for domesticated animals or really any animals that are kept as pets. So your example of animals kept for being hunted for sport wouldn't be subject to the cruelty laws, unless maybe for some reason the animals were hunted in very bizarre ways, like with flamethrowers or anti-tank missiles? Maybe. (actually not being sarcastic)

Since the story takes place in Vermont, according to their laws  http://www.leg.state.vt.us/statutes/fullchapter.cfm?Title=13&Chapter= 0 08    it's unclear what law applies, as there's no mention of "deer" or "reindeer" in the laws, but I'll assume they'll be grouped in with livestock.

It appears that this could be considered a felony, but if I've read the laws correctly, the cops and district attorney have the option to write a civil fine ticket even in the instance of severe abuse. It's purely at their discretion.

I don't agree with the way the cops handled it, and it's just my opinion, but any animals kept for entertainment purposes (excluding hunting as you pointed out) such as the business in the story, should have the same protections as domesticated animals. Animals used in film and television are very closely supervised by the ASPCA in regards to humane treatment, and I think that should apply to businesses like the one featured in story.
 
2014-03-03 09:48:48 PM  

LavenderWolf: strangeluck: No felony charge? Bastards.

Now let's be fair to the people involved. TFA is scant on details.

Situations in which a citation for animal cruelty is warranted, but felony charges are not: Rapid weather changes resulting in death, allowing patrons to feed non-feed items to animals, making inadequate shelter due to lack of knowledge of the animal's habitat, I could go on.

What actually killed these animals? Without knowing that, I don't think anyone can pass judgement on the park's owners.


Fair enough, and you're right, TFA is missing a lot of information. I amend my outrage until there's more information, but I'm very suspicious of a large amount of entertainment animals dying like that.

Interestingly enough, this story says the park closed due to financial woes back in 2011  http://www.cbsnews.com/news/santas-land-new-england-tradition-closes/  and lists different people as the owners.
 
2014-03-03 10:23:55 PM  

strangeluck: PolyHatSnake: strangeluck: No felony charge? Bastards.

Just thinking about the legal precedents that would set makes my head hurt. These were animals in the care of a business, and through alleged neglect, some of the animals died. When I think about the effects of punishing a business in that situation, I have to think about how that precedent scales up to larger, only slightly different businesses. The article talks about "deer", but it doesn't specify what type, which leaves it open to interpretation as white-tailed deer. Now, in the state of Texas, all individuals of white-tailed deer are considered property of the state, which enables the state to enforce it's hunting laws. However, a very common business here in TX is high-fenced game ranches, where a population of deer are fenced off in, essentially, a gigantic enclosure, and people pay significant amounts of money to go there and hunt those deer. Because of that, those businesses work hard to improve the deer herds in their enclosures, commonly by bringing in superior breeding animals, paying large sums for them. The deer are managed and manipulated very much like livestock, yet they remain the legal property of the state. It doesn't matter if that prize breeding buck they paid several grand for finds a hole in the fence, wanders in front of another hunter on an adjacent property, and gets shot. The game ranch is SOL in that situation. Now, let's think about if a ranch's water supply was lost, if all it's natural water elements like creeks, ponds and rivers ran dry, and the ranch wasn't able to supply enough water to keep their deer alive, and their resident population collapsed. Would that be that different from these Santa's land yahoos who didn't feed their deer, who you say should have felonies charged against them? It's an interesting, slightly scary thought. I don't really have much skin in the game there, as I don't own, work for, or hunt on those ranches, but they do represent a significant part of the economy of ...


I do understand your point, and it's a very good one. It's just the animal lover in me being angry at the way defenseless animals were treated. As far as hunting for entertainment, I personally hate that animals are hunted for sport, but I know it's part of life and it's nothing that will change.

Since you used Texas as an example, Texas does have a felony animal cruelty law  http://www.spca.org/page.aspx?pid=316  and it's meant more for domesticated animals or really any animals that are kept as pets. So your example of animals kept for being hunted for sport wouldn't be subject to the cruelty laws, unless maybe for some reason the animals were hunted in very bizarre ways, like with flamethrowers or anti-tank missiles? Maybe. (actually not being sarcastic)

Since the story takes place in Vermont, according to their laws  http://www.leg.state.vt.us/statutes/fullchapter.cfm?Title=13&Chapter= 0 08    it's unclear what law applies, as there's no mention of "deer" or "reindeer" in the laws, but I'll assume they'll be grouped in with livestock.

It appears that this could be considered a felony, but if I've read the laws correctly, the cops and district attorney have the option to write a civil fine ticket even in the instance of severe abuse. It's purely at their discretion.

I don't agree with the way the cops handled it, and it's just my opinion, but any animals kept for entertainment purposes (excluding hunting as you pointed out) such as the business in the story, should have the same protections as domesticated animals. Animals used in film and television are very closely supervised by the ASPCA in regards to humane treatment, and I think that should apply to businesses like the one featured in story.


Whoa. A concise, informed, level-headed response that contributes to the discussion, takes a stance, but doesn't step on toes? Did I wake up in crazy town today?!

That's actually one of the things that keeps me coming back to Fark, current news with informed, in-depth discussion. Thank you.

On the topic, I grew up very poor, and remain relatively poor. Hunting, to me, never was and won't be "sport". It's an activity I enjoy, but it's primary function is to put food on my table, holding much the same status as employment. I don't like the thought of animals being killed solely for enjoyment, for "sport", and I too REALLY don't like animals being killed due to neglect, or stupidity. If the people in TFA broke laws, I hope they're punished to the full extent.
 
2014-03-03 11:15:47 PM  
Sounds to me like he was tired of gettin' gypped.
 
2014-03-04 12:01:32 AM  

strangeluck: LavenderWolf: strangeluck: No felony charge? Bastards.

Now let's be fair to the people involved. TFA is scant on details.

Situations in which a citation for animal cruelty is warranted, but felony charges are not: Rapid weather changes resulting in death, allowing patrons to feed non-feed items to animals, making inadequate shelter due to lack of knowledge of the animal's habitat, I could go on.

What actually killed these animals? Without knowing that, I don't think anyone can pass judgement on the park's owners.

Fair enough, and you're right, TFA is missing a lot of information. I amend my outrage until there's more information, but I'm very suspicious of a large amount of entertainment animals dying like that.

Interestingly enough, this story says the park closed due to financial woes back in 2011  http://www.cbsnews.com/news/santas-land-new-england-tradition-closes/  and lists different people as the owners.


Definitely suspicious and warranting an investigation.
 
2014-03-04 12:08:13 AM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Hell, if I'd submitted it it would have gone red. I have the kiss of death on submissions lately

/glad you got the green :)


50th, baby!
 
2014-03-04 12:20:43 AM  

Chariset: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Hell, if I'd submitted it it would have gone red. I have the kiss of death on submissions lately

/glad you got the green :)

50th, baby!


w00t!
 
2014-03-04 07:28:27 AM  

Chariset: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Hell, if I'd submitted it it would have gone red. I have the kiss of death on submissions lately

/glad you got the green :)

50th, baby!


And beat mine, too.
Rats.
 
2014-03-04 08:01:08 PM  

Pathman: bigbobowski: I SWEAR if I was 18 this would be a road trip!!!!

maybe your mom will still let you go, you just have to ask

;-p

I would but she's dead.

 
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