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(Comic Book)   DC Comics can finally be purchased at your local grocery store. Inside boxes of Trix and Lucky Charms   (comicbook.com) divider line 27
    More: Silly, Lucky Charms, Justice League, grocery stores, comics, Big G  
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925 clicks; posted to Geek » on 03 Mar 2014 at 5:30 PM (28 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



27 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-03-03 05:04:00 PM
I started collecting at the end of the newsstand era, with Superman: The Man of Steel #37, Robin #10, Detective Comics #678, Batman #512, and Green Lantern #55, all bought off a 7-11 magazine rack. They also happened to be Zero Hour crossover books, but unlike today's boring red skies crossover books with blah covers, they had covers that would draw you in...

img1.wikia.nocookie.net

img1.wikia.nocookie.net

clzimages.com

img2.wikia.nocookie.net

img4.wikia.nocookie.net

And the last comic I remember buying from a grocery store was Flash #97, yet another interesting cover, and a part of a multi-part story-arc back when they weren't 90% padding

img1.wikia.nocookie.net

/man, I miss the real DC Universe.
 
2014-03-03 05:15:43 PM

FirstNationalBastard: unlike today's boring red skies crossover books with blah covers, they had covers that would draw you in...


Because you were a kid.
 
2014-03-03 05:16:16 PM
I wonder how many of these will see actual distribution.
It's entirely possible they'll be actually collectible someday.
 
2014-03-03 05:26:56 PM

doglover: FirstNationalBastard: unlike today's boring red skies crossover books with blah covers, they had covers that would draw you in...

Because you were a kid.


No shiat.

The golden age is 12.

But the stories still hold up today, and they're still cool covers.


unlikely: I wonder how many of these will see actual distribution.
It's entirely possible they'll be actually collectible someday.


Actually, it's been done before, and recently

http://www.thenightowlmama.com/2011/11/big-g-cereals-and-dc-super-he ro -comic-books-giveaway.html

The ones from the 1940s are collectable, though. Don't remember if it was Superman, Captain Marvel, or both.
 
2014-03-03 05:40:28 PM
I have some old 40s and 50s era giveaways, they're not that valuable but they're really fun to read.

This one is fun:
peteredteck.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-03-03 06:07:10 PM

unlikely: I have some old 40s and 50s era giveaways, they're not that valuable but they're really fun to read.

This one is fun:
[peteredteck.files.wordpress.com image 415x600]


Just because they didn't actually include a question mark doesn't stop the usual rule about "any headline that asks a question" from applying.

/Also, very appropriate username.
 
2014-03-03 06:16:15 PM

Last Man on Earth: /Also, very appropriate username.


I don't get what you're saying here. It's not fun to read? Are you suggesting I don't have one of those books?
 
2014-03-03 06:22:43 PM

unlikely: Last Man on Earth: /Also, very appropriate username.

I don't get what you're saying here. It's not fun to read? Are you suggesting I don't have one of those books?


I think he's saying your user name is an answer to the question on your comic book cover.
 
2014-03-03 06:26:06 PM

unlikely: I wonder how many of these will see actual distribution.
It's entirely possible they'll be actually collectible someday.


nope , because some will  buy them for the actual cereal in the box but there will be an army of people buying them as investments hoping to cash in on a goldmine some day in the near future but they will end up being sold years down the road at a flea market or garage sale for $2 each , all 6 for $10
 
2014-03-03 06:26:48 PM
Also , everything is collectible just not always valuable.
 
2014-03-03 06:30:04 PM
"There is a certain shared fanaticism among cereal lovers and comic book fans."

I can picture Comic Book Guy upset that Trix's new Wildberry Red Swirls completely undermine the multi-colored aesthetic pleasure of the bowl.
 
2014-03-03 06:33:23 PM

Confabulat: "There is a certain shared fanaticism among cereal lovers and comic book fans."

I can picture Comic Book Guy upset that Trix's new Wildberry Red Swirls completely undermine the multi-colored aesthetic pleasure of the bowl.


The Boo Berry reboot completely destroyed the franchise.
 
2014-03-03 06:41:00 PM
These have been around for at least 2 months, and I bought a box of Cheerios today with one in it.

So now I have #2 and #6 of 8.  And you don't know which you're getting.  And I don't eat that many Cheerios.

Better luck next time, DC
 
2014-03-03 07:13:41 PM
I had heard Nu52 wasn't selling well, but this reeks of desperation.
 
2014-03-03 07:33:54 PM
My first comics were purchased in the 1970s from the Kresge comic rack near the checkouts, not far from the soda fountain... And when I  say "soda fountain" I mean an actual soda fountain where I could order egg creams, chocolate Coke, milkshakes, and phosphates.
 
2014-03-03 08:21:29 PM

FirstNationalBastard: Confabulat: "There is a certain shared fanaticism among cereal lovers and comic book fans."

I can picture Comic Book Guy upset that Trix's new Wildberry Red Swirls completely undermine the multi-colored aesthetic pleasure of the bowl.

The Boo Berry reboot completely destroyed the franchise.


Maybe, but Frankberry sucked because the let Rob Liefeld draw the box art.

img.fark.net
 
2014-03-03 08:51:22 PM
I wouldn't mind getting into certain comics, but the fact that I'd be getting into something with 20+ years of backstory just daunts me.
 
2014-03-03 09:06:37 PM

gnosis301: I wouldn't mind getting into certain comics, but the fact that I'd be getting into something with 20+ years of backstory just daunts me.


DC's New 52 is for you.

It's not  good,  but it was made for folks to jump into comics as if it's all "new".

However, if you want a nice place to jump in with Marvel, I'd say go pick up the Ultimates 1 trade paperback. That's a good read. If you want to get into mainstream Marvel, you don't need to be worried- They do a recap and quite a bit of "catching up the reader" every issue on page one.

Want to get into Spider-Man? Amazing Spider-Man is restarting at #1 again in April. Grab that. It should be a fun time. All you need to know will be spelled out for you, and if you're still lost, you can always hit the Wiki for any character to get background info.
 
2014-03-03 09:40:45 PM

FirstNationalBastard: I started collecting at the end of the newsstand era, with Superman: The Man of Steel #37, Robin #10, Detective Comics #678, Batman #512, and Green Lantern #55, all bought off a 7-11 magazine rack. They also happened to be Zero Hour crossover books, but unlike today's boring red skies crossover books with blah covers, they had covers that would draw you in...

[img1.wikia.nocookie.net image 400x610]

[img1.wikia.nocookie.net image 400x598]

[clzimages.com image 400x613]

[img2.wikia.nocookie.net image 400x625]

[img4.wikia.nocookie.net image 400x615]

And the last comic I remember buying from a grocery store was Flash #97, yet another interesting cover, and a part of a multi-part story-arc back when they weren't 90% padding

[img1.wikia.nocookie.net image 400x612]

/man, I miss the real DC Universe.


I miss endless summers of stopping off at 7-11 on the way to the pool. I was a Marvel only fan then, though.
 
2014-03-03 11:40:00 PM
When I was a wee Quizzical, from ages 6 to 8 or so, and my mom took me grocery shopping, I happily camped out in the magazine/comic aisle while she picked up the food.  I remember reading Groo, and Batman, and Archie.
 
2014-03-04 12:06:47 AM

Nix Nightbird: FirstNationalBastard: Confabulat: "There is a certain shared fanaticism among cereal lovers and comic book fans."

I can picture Comic Book Guy upset that Trix's new Wildberry Red Swirls completely undermine the multi-colored aesthetic pleasure of the bowl.

The Boo Berry reboot completely destroyed the franchise.

Maybe, but Frankberry sucked because the let Rob Liefeld draw the box art.

[img.fark.net image 454x701]


How did a no talent hack like Liefeld EVER get a job as an artist. Man that guy sucks.
 
2014-03-04 07:57:38 AM

Fano: FirstNationalBastard: I started collecting at the end of the newsstand era, with Superman: The Man of Steel #37, Robin #10, Detective Comics #678, Batman #512, and Green Lantern #55, all bought off a 7-11 magazine rack. They also happened to be Zero Hour crossover books, but unlike today's boring red skies crossover books with blah covers, they had covers that would draw you in...

[img1.wikia.nocookie.net image 400x610]

[img1.wikia.nocookie.net image 400x598]

[clzimages.com image 400x613]

[img2.wikia.nocookie.net image 400x625]

[img4.wikia.nocookie.net image 400x615]

And the last comic I remember buying from a grocery store was Flash #97, yet another interesting cover, and a part of a multi-part story-arc back when they weren't 90% padding

[img1.wikia.nocookie.net image 400x612]

/man, I miss the real DC Universe.

I miss endless summers of stopping off at 7-11 on the way to the pool. I was a Marvel only fan then, though.


I picked up my first Marvel Comics in late 1994 at an old Revco drug store. IIRC, it was Fantastic Four 403, some Spider-Man books from the Trial of Peter Parker ( when they pulled the trigger and revealed that Ben Reilly was the real Spidey and Pete was the clone), and Captain America 438, which was the first Iron Cap issue.

Why I kept reading Marvel Comics is anyone's guess.
 
2014-03-04 10:26:08 AM
Got comic books at this tiny comic book shop underneath a mall in NJ.  And when I say "underneath" I mean "underneath."

The mall had a main floor with all the regular mall stores and fountains and stuff, then off to the side there were some unmarked stairs and an escalator that led to this bizarre sub basement that was the Level X of the retail world.

It was basically just a giant room painted black with casino carpeting on the floor.  The "stores" were actually cubicle partitions.  They had doors, but the walls didn't go all the way up to the ceiling.  They were all the weird stores that were not quite ready for prime time -- the comic book shop, the D&D shop, the lady that made dolls, two guys trying to sell concert tickets, some kind of juice bar thing.  I think there was a head shop at one point.

I remember that outside this area there was a long, empty corridor that ran the length of the mall, hundreds of feet in either direction of vinyl tile and fluorescent lighting.  It was longer than an athletic track, but didn't really go anywhere.  I think when the mall was designed in the sixties it was supposed to be like an enclosed "main street" and provide frontage for small professional services like dentists and accountants.  It was all walled off though except for one or two random offices and, of all things, a Catholic chapel.
 
2014-03-04 10:51:49 AM
Found a YouTube video of it.  You have to skip to about three minutes in before you can see the weird stuff though.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GdvRy5zb0v0">http://www.youtube.com/w atch?v=GdvRy5zb0v0

This was about ten years after the retail traffic collapsed at this site.

The things you do for comics as a kid.  This was the retail equivalent of jumping in the back of some dude's van.
 
2014-03-04 11:00:51 AM

FirstNationalBastard: I picked up my first Marvel Comics in late 1994 at an old Revco drug store. IIRC, it was Fantastic Four 403, some Spider-Man books from the Trial of Peter Parker ( when they pulled the trigger and revealed that Ben Reilly was the real Spidey and Pete was the clone), and Captain America 438, which was the first Iron Cap issue.

Why I kept reading Marvel Comics is anyone's guess.


Huh. I guess I'm a couple years older than you. I just cross checked x-men and spider-man against wikipedia and you're right about the magic age of 12. From ages of 9-14 I read comics, and I apparently petered out on reading Spider-man shortly before Carnage made the scene. X-men I dropped out sometime after Inferno - about the time they were all dead and that abbo in Australia had them go through the Siege Perilous or whatnot. A couple issues of Wolverine, discovering Jubilee, and Nanny had me out for a long while. I guess I missed out completely on the Dork age 90s of X-treme X-men. I remember when Bishop first showed up, and once everyone's superpower was "using a gun" I was out for about a decade or so.

One group of memories I'd like to share here is, in the days before the big omnibus reprints and the internet, HAVING to go to the hobby shop/comic shop to find back issues and origin stories. I bought Classic X-men and whatever they titled the classic Spider-man to pick up on all those "--back in ish #115 Smilin Stan Lee" references to helpfully explain all the backstory you didn't know. It all seemed mysterious then, and I can sympathize with the classic Simpsons episode where they are in awe of getting Radioactive Man #1 and ACTUALLY seeing the origin, rather than seeing the blurb. Rather odd, given my hatred of origin story movies.
 
2014-03-04 11:15:50 AM

Fano: FirstNationalBastard: I picked up my first Marvel Comics in late 1994 at an old Revco drug store. IIRC, it was Fantastic Four 403, some Spider-Man books from the Trial of Peter Parker ( when they pulled the trigger and revealed that Ben Reilly was the real Spidey and Pete was the clone), and Captain America 438, which was the first Iron Cap issue.

Why I kept reading Marvel Comics is anyone's guess.

Huh. I guess I'm a couple years older than you. I just cross checked x-men and spider-man against wikipedia and you're right about the magic age of 12. From ages of 9-14 I read comics, and I apparently petered out on reading Spider-man shortly before Carnage made the scene. X-men I dropped out sometime after Inferno - about the time they were all dead and that abbo in Australia had them go through the Siege Perilous or whatnot. A couple issues of Wolverine, discovering Jubilee, and Nanny had me out for a long while. I guess I missed out completely on the Dork age 90s of X-treme X-men. I remember when Bishop first showed up, and once everyone's superpower was "using a gun" I was out for about a decade or so.

One group of memories I'd like to share here is, in the days before the big omnibus reprints and the internet, HAVING to go to the hobby shop/comic shop to find back issues and origin stories. I bought Classic X-men and whatever they titled the classic Spider-man to pick up on all those "--back in ish #115 Smilin Stan Lee" references to helpfully explain all the backstory you didn't know. It all seemed mysterious then, and I can sympathize with the classic Simpsons episode where they are in awe of getting Radioactive Man #1 and ACTUALLY seeing the origin, rather than seeing the blurb. Rather odd, given my hatred of origin story movies.


Oddly enough, the lower northern region of Virginia has never been without a comic shop. Each one had various amounts of stock.

Grand Slam Cards and Comics was my first, had a fair amount of back stock, but at guide price and no full runs.

Then I found Penguin comics, which had a decent amount of stuff at fairly decent prices, but went away, only to turn up in an indoor flea market, renamed as Crime City comics. That was where I finally completed my Trial of Barry Allen run, because no one had issues 349 and 350. And, Flash 112, which was difficult to find for some reason.

There was also Marie's Books and Things, which was stuffed with crap, like a Velvet Elvis painting I wish I had paid the 20 bucks for, but was the only game in town for a while.

Then came Ed's, Big Monkey, Little Fish...

Now, I'm an internet buyer only. But nothing beat finding Stories Comics in Richmond for the first time in 1997, and finding a near complete run of Wally Flash comics at the same time.

The internet is cheaper, but the thrill of the hunt is gone.
 
2014-03-04 09:40:06 PM
I'm not going to tell you how old I am, but I am OLD by Fark standards.

I remember spending summers with my grandmother. She'd give me a dollar when we went to the grocery store and I'd get four comic books.

That's how I followed how Daredevil met Moon Dragon, and the Defenders vs the Avengers story arc.

/I go back aways.
 
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