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(SacBee)   One Californian ponders why snow in the east can't be hauled to CA to ease the drought. Another Californian wonders why this guy doesn't live in Florida   (sacbee.com) divider line 29
    More: Stupid, East Coast, droughts, March On, drought tolerance, snow  
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5703 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Mar 2014 at 5:36 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2014-03-03 05:27:52 PM  
5 votes:
If only California were located near some large body of water.

Of course, that would be of no use unless you had abundant sunshine for desalinization.
2014-03-03 05:42:22 PM  
3 votes:
What if they just dehydrated the water down, greatly reducing the weight for shipping?
2014-03-03 05:42:01 PM  
3 votes:

Mark Ratner: What about hooking up a giant outboard motor onto an iceberg, and moving it to California?
[std3.ru image 400x227]


I have a better idea. Let your yard die.  The farms need the water more than your grass does
2014-03-03 06:04:21 PM  
2 votes:

30yrs2l8: I wonder how we have allowed 50% of the nations fruit and produce be to grown in a state that doesn't have its own adequate water supply?


Largely because California's high quality arable land, year-round growing climate, and variety of microclimates enable it to either get much higher yields for most crops, or to grow lots of things that other states really simply cannot grow effectively.  It's a reasonable arrangement to maximize the production from our available resources, assuming you aren't interested in engaging in some kind of ineffectual state-d*ck-waving contest like Smeggy Smurf up there.
2014-03-03 06:02:26 PM  
2 votes:

Smeggy Smurf: Mark Ratner: What about hooking up a giant outboard motor onto an iceberg, and moving it to California?
[std3.ru image 400x227]

I have a better idea. Let your yard die.  The farms need the water more than your grass does


Yes, water yards in a desert is retarded. No argument there. But this is the water use breakdown for CA.

www.environment.ucla.edu
2014-03-03 05:54:26 PM  
2 votes:
I wonder how we have allowed 50% of the nations fruit and produce be to grown in a state that doesn't have its own adequate water supply? Talk about stupid. If Cali doesn't get water from the surrounding sates we all take it in the a$$ every time we buy food.
2014-03-03 05:53:01 PM  
2 votes:

axeeugene: California can have our water when they pry it from our cold, cold, COLD dead hands.

The Great Lakes Compact is a wonderful thing.

You live in a place with no water? FARK OFF.


Okay, we'll see how you like the quintupled produce prices.


Nemo's Brother: So I guess California needs the fly over states more than they need California?


gifrific.com

Hardly.  It's fairly symbiotic.  You give us water, we grow your food.  California grows 80% of the fruits and veggies for the country in general, and close to 100% of a lot of common specialty crops.  Oh, except feed corn and soybeans, of course.  You got that covered.
2014-03-03 05:45:30 PM  
2 votes:
Aside from the sheer amount you'd need to make a difference, I also occasionally hear people suggesting a pipeline to ship water to the West.  This is a practical impossibility too because of the amount of energy needed to get the water over the Rocky Mountains.  It would probably be more efficient just to build the desalinization plants.

This is also no doubt one of the many reasons Canada is pushing the Keystone oil pipeline instead of building one from Alberta to Vancouver.
2014-03-03 05:40:06 PM  
2 votes:
I don't believe any questions like these are "bad" questions. We Americans have accomplished some pretty amazing feats of engineering , so it's not surprising that some people to assume that difficult things are easier than they think.

Hell, almost every American assumes what they don't understand is easy.
2014-03-03 07:11:30 PM  
1 votes:

The Southern Dandy: See, California is basically SF and LA, surrounded by Alabama.  I'm betting the snow hauling guy is from the Alabama part of California.ytterbium: SurelyShirley: 30yrs2l8: I wonder how we have allowed 50% of the nations fruit and produce be to grown in a state that doesn't have its own adequate water supply? Talk about stupid. If Cali doesn't get water from the surrounding sates we all take it in the a$$ every time we buy food.

Exactly. We should just grow all our fruits, veggies etc in Michigan, where there's an abundance of water.

I can see Lake Michigan from mah house, and within 15 miles of here we have:
Sweet corn, soybean and wheat fields, three blueberry farms, two strawberry farms, several apple orchards, a few poultry farms, several beef farms, a hog farm, several wineries, distillers and breweries; three large-scale pumpkin/veggie farms, two hydroponic tomato/lettuce/herb facilities, plus many CSAs and community gardens.

We'd survive without CA produce, though I would miss pistachios and avocados.

Just FYI, California is the largest agriculture producer in the US, followed by Texas, which produces about half of what California does.


Hey, we are building a a desalination plant for San Antonio. There's lots of brackish water under here apparently. But there have been water restrictions here ever since they found those blind salamanders in the aquifer way back, no crisis yet.
2014-03-03 06:57:31 PM  
1 votes:
See, California is basically SF and LA, surrounded by Alabama.  I'm betting the snow hauling guy is from the Alabama part of California.

ytterbium: SurelyShirley: 30yrs2l8: I wonder how we have allowed 50% of the nations fruit and produce be to grown in a state that doesn't have its own adequate water supply? Talk about stupid. If Cali doesn't get water from the surrounding sates we all take it in the a$$ every time we buy food.

Exactly. We should just grow all our fruits, veggies etc in Michigan, where there's an abundance of water.

I can see Lake Michigan from mah house, and within 15 miles of here we have:
Sweet corn, soybean and wheat fields, three blueberry farms, two strawberry farms, several apple orchards, a few poultry farms, several beef farms, a hog farm, several wineries, distillers and breweries; three large-scale pumpkin/veggie farms, two hydroponic tomato/lettuce/herb facilities, plus many CSAs and community gardens.

We'd survive without CA produce, though I would miss pistachios and avocados.


Just FYI, California is the largest agriculture producer in the US, followed by Texas, which produces about half of what California does.
2014-03-03 06:29:48 PM  
1 votes:

Monkeyhouse Zendo: theflatline: Your avocados would come from the Dominican Republic or South America.

And they are a cruel joke played on anyone who's lived in an avocado producing region. The flavorless stones sold as avocados in the Midwest are only fit for consumption by Midwesterners.


I have lived in Colombia and I can tell you there are far more varieties there and with much better flavor than anything grown in California.
2014-03-03 06:28:25 PM  
1 votes:

Gawdzila: theflatline: Gawdzila: 30yrs2l8: I wonder how we have allowed 50% of the nations fruit and produce be to grown in a state that doesn't have its own adequate water supply?

Largely because California's high quality arable land, year-round growing climate, and variety of microclimates enable it to either get much higher yields for most crops, or to grow lots of things that other states really simply cannot grow effectively.  It's a reasonable arrangement to maximize the production from our available resources, assuming you aren't interested in engaging in some kind of ineffectual state-d*ck-waving contest like Smeggy Smurf up there.

You realize most of South America falls in high quality ariable land, microclimates, and has plenty of fresh water going fo it?  And many companies are setting up huge vegetable grow ops there?

Yeah, of course, in fact we already get certain things from them that are strictly summer crops.  But for us here in the U.S., the transportation costs for South American produce would be higher, fruits and veggies would have to be picked further away from ripeness to be viable for store shelves, and our food supplies would be dependent on a foreign country with, in some cases, questionable labor practices.  I'm not sure why that would be preferable to growing our own food here in California.  It's good for the economy of the country as a whole, in fact: California supplies a majority of almonds and artichokes to the world, not just the U.S..  Isn't decreasing our trade deficit a good thing?


Hey now.

Stop getting in the way of a hatefilled wankfest about California suffering.  It's the most pleasure they're going to get tonight outside of the 30 minutes they'll spend looking at digital boobies.
2014-03-03 06:26:40 PM  
1 votes:

Monkeyhouse Zendo: theflatline: Your avocados would come from the Dominican Republic or South America.

And they are a cruel joke played on anyone who's lived in an avocado producing region. The flavorless stones sold as avocados in the Midwest are only fit for consumption by Midwesterners.


I thought there was a reason I never understood why so many people like them.
/Minnesotan.
2014-03-03 06:24:53 PM  
1 votes:

theflatline: Your avocados would come from the Dominican Republic or South America.


And they are a cruel joke played on anyone who's lived in an avocado producing region. The flavorless stones sold as avocados in the Midwest are only fit for consumption by Midwesterners.
2014-03-03 06:12:26 PM  
1 votes:
Ooh - how about building an aqueduct to replenish the Platte / high plains aquifer?
2014-03-03 06:11:30 PM  
1 votes:

SurelyShirley: 30yrs2l8: I wonder how we have allowed 50% of the nations fruit and produce be to grown in a state that doesn't have its own adequate water supply? Talk about stupid. If Cali doesn't get water from the surrounding sates we all take it in the a$$ every time we buy food.

Exactly. We should just grow all our fruits, veggies etc in Michigan, where there's an abundance of water.


I can see Lake Michigan from mah house, and within 15 miles of here we have:
Sweet corn, soybean and wheat fields, three blueberry farms, two strawberry farms, several apple orchards, a few poultry farms, several beef farms, a hog farm, several wineries, distillers and breweries; three large-scale pumpkin/veggie farms, two hydroponic tomato/lettuce/herb facilities, plus many CSAs and community gardens.

We'd survive without CA produce, though I would miss pistachios and avocados.
2014-03-03 06:00:41 PM  
1 votes:
the #1 cost of desalinization is lifting the water above where it is being sent.   a plant that can desalinize 1,000,000 gallons per day (and there are 14 of them in California) needs to lift 1 million gallons each day.

the 2nd major cost is creating the pressure it takes to force the water through the filters that remove the salt.

the rest of the stuff is easy to do, removing the other contaminates both organinc and inorganic.

of course if California could put a HUGE greenhouse like structure over the Pacific Ocean, then they could cause water to "evaporate" and it would then form "clouds"    which produce "rain and snow".
2014-03-03 05:58:44 PM  
1 votes:
If we can build a space elevator surely we can build a snow conveyor across the country. We just to pull up our boot straps a bit.
2014-03-03 05:56:54 PM  
1 votes:

Gawdzila: axeeugene: California can have our water when they pry it from our cold, cold, COLD dead hands.

The Great Lakes Compact is a wonderful thing.

You live in a place with no water? FARK OFF.

Okay, we'll see how you like the quintupled produce prices.


Nemo's Brother: So I guess California needs the fly over states more than they need California?

[gifrific.com image 245x285]

Hardly.  It's fairly symbiotic.  You give us water, we grow your food.  California grows 80% of the fruits and veggies for the country in general, and close to 100% of a lot of common specialty crops.  Oh, except feed corn and soybeans, of course.  You got that covered.


I'm looking forward to seeing what happens when the producers in California no longer have enough for the looters to seize and give to the moochers.  When you're out of water there won't be anything to take.  Then what?  Meltdown, riots, etc.  You do need us more than we need you.
2014-03-03 05:56:20 PM  
1 votes:

wxboy: Aside from the sheer amount you'd need to make a difference, I also occasionally hear people suggesting a pipeline to ship water to the West.  This is a practical impossibility too because of the amount of energy needed to get the water over the Rocky Mountains.  It would probably be more efficient just to build the desalinization plants.



There is a pipeline through the Rocky Mountains from the eastern side of Colorado all the way west. My dad was involved in surveying it around 1957.
2014-03-03 05:55:28 PM  
1 votes:
No, you can't have our water.  Feel free to move here and pay taxes though.
2014-03-03 05:45:55 PM  
1 votes:
l.yimg.com
2014-03-03 05:45:00 PM  
1 votes:

Eddie Adams from Torrance: If only California were located near some large body of water.

Of course, that would be of no use unless you had abundant sunshine for desalinization.


Or some nice sheets of graphene.
Abundant sunshine or no, current desalination techniques are too energy-inefficient to be practical on such a large scale for anything but a last resort.  California is responsible for too much of the country's produce to fulfill our water needs using flash or RO desalination.  New nano-filters would change that, though.
2014-03-03 05:44:24 PM  
1 votes:

ytterbium: Lest anyone forgets, there is a compact amongst the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Waterways, USA and Canada, that no one can take our water. I believe MI is prepared to use military force if needed.


The treaty said nothing about snow
Read the fine print next time
2014-03-03 05:43:38 PM  
1 votes:

Eddie Adams from Torrance: If only California were located near some large body of water.

Of course, that would be of no use unless you had abundant sunshine for desalinization.


Or nuclear power.
2014-03-03 05:42:25 PM  
1 votes:
California can have our water when they pry it from our cold, cold, COLD dead hands.

The Great Lakes Compact is a wonderful thing.

You live in a place with no water? FARK OFF.

/Forget it, Jake. It's Chinatown.
2014-03-03 05:40:17 PM  
1 votes:
Lest anyone forgets, there is a compact amongst the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Waterways, USA and Canada, that no one can take our water. I believe MI is prepared to use military force if needed.
2014-03-03 04:54:40 PM  
1 votes:
Because we haul it to poland and sell it to them for clean fill.
 
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