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(Fox News)   People with insomnia have trouble sleeping   (foxnews.com) divider line 60
    More: Obvious, insomnias, TMS  
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2725 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Mar 2014 at 2:02 PM (30 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-03 07:02:27 PM

doloresonthedottedline: philodough: yakmans_dad: I've had insomnia since Thanksgiving 2006. (I can date the onset.) It's as if there was a switch in my head that got thrown into the No Sleep position. Until I was able to get the medicine for it -- around 6 weeks later -- it was horrifying. None of those little checklist things they so confidently prescribe -- get out of bed, take a bath, dim lights in the evening, no caffeine -- do anything at all.

It isn't obvious why some people can sleep and some can't. But there are quacks out there claiming to help insomniacs. What helps, unfortunately, are chemicals. And they eventually erode your ... memory.

I am not alone. My insomia is horrifyingly bad. The longest stretch - 11 days and nights without sleep. Oddly, I didn't go bonkers. That really puzzles the sleep clinic and other doctors.

Lots of links here:  http://www.researchgate.net/post/What_about_the_orexin_hypocretin_rec e ptors_antagonists_for_the_treatment_of_insomnia

Orexin/hypocretin antagonists basically put you in the state narcoleptics are in. Should put you to sleep. Looks like there's one close to being released. The biggest concern is that it'll cause cataplexy but according to that, it hasn't yet. Which is actually pretty weird, but good for insomniacs.


Thank you. My doctored prescribed a wicked bad solution for some time. It knocks you unconscious completely. Someone could punch you in the face and you wouldn't wake up. Unfortunately, my insomnia refused to submit. That alternative was tried only after everything on planet earth failed.

Exercise? I'm the fittest person in one of the fittest cities in the Puget Sound. I can run circles around my Marine Corp little sister who surpassed all her male co-Marines in physical performance.

I've done everything right on my end with the sleep hygiene too.

And you wonder how I ended up on Fark : )
 
2014-03-03 08:10:22 PM
Since it's Fox News, I assume by "good" sleepers they mean the 65-80 demographic that goes to church on Sunday, hate gays, and votes for whoever they tell them to.
 
2014-03-03 08:33:22 PM
Ambien Walrus was the best man at my wedding.  He's a nice guy.
 
2014-03-03 09:18:38 PM
Nice to hear from other insomniacs.  I've had it since I was a child, which is apparently pretty uncommon.  It's hard to overstate the devastating toll this takes on a person's life - relationships, health, career....

My longest stretch is 4 days.  I typically come out of them very slowly, too.  No sleep binge - I just start sleeping a few hours a night after several nights of no sleep.

Have had a hard time getting a sleep doctor to take it seriously.  I think they just prefer sleep apnea patients - they they can just diagnose and cycle those folks through quickly.

And yeah, exercise in the middle of an "episode" just feels like torture - just get achy muscles while still being unable to sleep.
 
2014-03-03 09:42:23 PM
uh, yes, we do....I don't want to complain....okay, I lie, I do want to complain.   If I'm sober, I often spend 30 hours awake.  And then I might sleep for four hours.

It sucks.  DNRTFA, but I am all too familiar with insomnia.


Drinking brings a whole 'nother set of problems, but at least I usually can sleep....for a little while.

I'm pretty sure my drinking causes insomnia which I try to cure by drinking moar and drinking moar just feeds into insomnia.

I don't even know what time I woke up today.  I really don't.  I think it was still dark.  Who the hell cares?
 
2014-03-03 09:49:26 PM

gfid: uh, yes, we do....I don't want to complain....okay, I lie, I do want to complain.   If I'm sober, I often spend 30 hours awake.  And then I might sleep for four hours.

It sucks.  DNRTFA, but I am all too familiar with insomnia.


Drinking brings a whole 'nother set of problems, but at least I usually can sleep....for a little while.

I'm pretty sure my drinking causes insomnia which I try to cure by drinking moar and drinking moar just feeds into insomnia.

I don't even know what time I woke up today.  I really don't.  I think it was still dark.  Who the hell cares?


just in case anyone is wondering about staying awake for 30 hours, that's not an exaggeration.  It's also without drugs including caffeine.    This would actually be cool if my waking hours were full of alertness and such, but it's mostly just feeling beat down and tired and cannot sleep.   it really sucks,
 
2014-03-03 11:25:27 PM

abmoraz: Smeggy Smurf: I find my insomnia is greatly reduced on cardio days.  When you start with a 6 mile sprint on the bike in under 20 minutes you're not going to have trouble sleeping.

I had the opposite effect.  Days I worked out or played multiple hockey games were the hardest to sleep.  My body was physically beat (I couldn't get up and move), but my brain was wide awake.

I think many people who don't have insomnia don't understand the difference between "exhausted" (physically tired) and "sleepy" (mentally tired).  I can't sleep because my brain won't shut off.  I can stare at the ceiling for HOURS, even if my body is so tired that I'm near paralyzed.

My insomnia sometimes get so bad that I experience minor seizures (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myoclonus ) that will cause my head to swing back and forth for several seconds or my shoulders and neck to "flutter".  They are similar to breathing in that they are involuntary, but I can stop them for a short time if I concentrate hard enough on them.  They really freak out people around me who see them.

They are natural for people who are already sleeping, but if you read my previous post, my brain often gets stuck in clinical sleep mode while I'm fully conscious and mobile.  It's not epilepsy, but a physical manifestation of a sleep disorder.


I know that only all too well.  Melatonin works wonders for me provided I take it early enough.  But when I don't take it early I find that meditating isn't a complete substitute for sleep but it's better than being fully alert.  My personal method is to focus on a flame and feed everything into it until there is nothing but warmth.

Yes, a guy like me meditates.  It's not just a hippie weenie thing.
 
2014-03-04 04:10:51 AM
Nothing is more frustrating than insomnia than people giving "advice" about beating insomnia. Yes. I've tried everything you can suggest, plus plenty more that others have, plus my own research. I'd love to me "normal". I'm not being stubborn. But staying up as long as I can won't reset anything nor will any other technique. My ideal is a jobI can work on my own hours. Historical documents actually point to people sleeping a few hours, being awake a few hours, then going down for their 2nd sleep. My fellow sleep "problem" people I encourage to look this up. It seems to be the actual normal sleep for humans. I posit that we night owls are simply more tuned into the natural clock but lifestyle and artificial light mean we just back-clock... or something.

2nd sleep evidence : Nothing is more frustrating than insomnia than people giving "advice" about beating insomnia. Yes. I've tried everything you can suggest, plus plenty more that others have, plus my own research. I'd love to me "normal". I'm not being stubborn. But staying up as long as I can won't reset anything nor will any other technique. My ideal is a jobI can work on my own hours. Historical documents actually point to people sleeping a few hours, being awake a few hours, then going down for their 2nd sleep. My fellow sleep "problem" people I encourage to look this up. It seems to be the actual normal sleep for humans.

http://m.bbc.com/news/magazine-16964783

Especially for those who wake in the middle of the night. Used to be a regular social thing where you'd even hang out with neighbors.
 
2014-03-04 04:22:56 AM

minorshan: Nothing is more frustrating than insomnia than people giving "advice" about beating insomnia. Yes. I've tried everything you can suggest, plus plenty more that others have, plus my own research. I'd love to me "normal". I'm not being stubborn. But staying up as long as I can won't reset anything nor will any other technique. My ideal is a jobI can work on my own hours. Historical documents actually point to people sleeping a few hours, being awake a few hours, then going down for their 2nd sleep. My fellow sleep "problem" people I encourage to look this up. It seems to be the actual normal sleep for humans. I posit that we night owls are simply more tuned into the natural clock but lifestyle and artificial light mean we just back-clock... or something.

2nd sleep evidence : Nothing is more frustrating than insomnia than people giving "advice" about beating insomnia. Yes. I've tried everything you can suggest, plus plenty more that others have, plus my own research. I'd love to me "normal". I'm not being stubborn. But staying up as long as I can won't reset anything nor will any other technique. My ideal is a jobI can work on my own hours. Historical documents actually point to people sleeping a few hours, being awake a few hours, then going down for their 2nd sleep. My fellow sleep "problem" people I encourage to look this up. It seems to be the actual normal sleep for humans.

http://m.bbc.com/news/magazine-16964783

Especially for those who wake in the middle of the night. Used to be a regular social thing where you'd even hang out with neighbors.


Aaand typing this in bed on a phone whilst trying to sleep equals copies and typos. Never said I wasn't suffering from it. :/
 
2014-03-04 11:12:23 AM

doloresonthedottedline: People always talk about "thyroid condition" like it's an excuse for getting fat. But I felt like I was absolutely starving. I couldn't think of anything but food (especially red meat, for some reason), and I couldn't sleep, so there were even more hours to think about food. I was too foggy-headed to do anything distracting, and going *DOWN* a flight of stairs left me absolutely exhausted. I didn't just get out of shape, either. I lived on the third story of an old Victorian house and had to walk everywhere I went, including 3+ trips to the grocery store because I had to carry whatever I bought back. I went from being fine with that to struggling to even get down the stairs to just leave.


I understand completely.  My Doctor described hypothyroidism as such: Your brain controls most immediate actions: breating, heartbeat, movement, senses, etc...  Your thyroid controls long term events.  One of those events is your body's ability to store and utilize fat.  Low thyroid hormone levels tricks your body into thinking it is in starvation mode.  This means several things: 1. you are always hungry, even if your stomach is physically full.  2. Any excess calories that you don't immediately burn off get stored as body fat (meaning that just about every excess calorie I've ever eaten in the last 25 years is still on me as fat).  3. That fat is nearly impossible to burn, so once you run through the available blood sugar, you will get extremely exhausted and winded.**  4. It also leads to "fuzziness" in the mind, mainly due to lack of blood sugar.  5. It has a high correlation to type II diabetes due to blood sugar regulation problems (especially spikes and troughs)  6. It can affect memory, immune system responses, mood and mood disorders (Depression, manic-depression, bipolar, and eventually dementia if left untreated for decades) because your thyroid regulates most hormone levels (or, more accurately, it regulates the other hormone regulators).

Part of the reason he thinks I've had the condition since puberty is that I have several immediate relatives (grandma, mother, uncle, 4 cousins) who all have thyroid issues (some hypo, some hyper).  Before puberty, I played some endurance type sports (BMX biking, basketball) and wasn't heavy at all.  After puberty, I started to put on weight and switched to mostly "wind sprint" type sports where the activity is in short bursts with decent rest periods in between (tennis, volleyball, hockey, football, baseball).  This would fit in line with hypothyroidism where I'd use my blood sugar reserves, then have to rest to replenish them with Gatoraid, soda, or other sugar drinks.  I remember one tennis match (Districts in high school) where my coach was appalled that I drank 9 cans of Coke rather than water during the match.  Knowing what I know now, it made sense.  Water was nice, but I needed the quick sugar to keep playing.

**Adrenalin plays some part in this.  Adrenalin trumps free T3/T4 and can release fat for burning.  So people like me, who get overly amped for sports and get adrenalin rushes from them, can burn some fat.  It also explains why I could go longer on the court/field/rink than I ever could in workouts.  The adrenalin gave me more blood sugar to work with.
 
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