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(Fox News)   People with insomnia have trouble sleeping   (foxnews.com) divider line 60
    More: Obvious, insomnias, TMS  
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2726 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Mar 2014 at 2:02 PM (30 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-03 02:03:04 PM
yes yes
 
2014-03-03 02:05:14 PM
In a small study, researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine studied the brain activity of 28 participants...

I used to smoke pot with Johnny Hopkins.
 
2014-03-03 02:05:23 PM
I don't know why subby used the OBVIOUS tag for a Fox"News" article. Nothing is obvious to those people...
 
2014-03-03 02:05:29 PM
I have insomnia. I didn't realise that it was my insomnia not letting me sleep.
 
2014-03-03 02:05:53 PM
I heard that people with a toothache have trouble chewing. Is it true?
 
2014-03-03 02:06:29 PM
Am I in before the Commandant of Stalag 17?
 
2014-03-03 02:08:21 PM
Maybe they're just addicted to being awake. Ever thought of that, subbysmartypants?
 
2014-03-03 02:09:11 PM

darkone: yes yes


It was me, I plead guilty
 
2014-03-03 02:11:57 PM
I've had insomnia since Thanksgiving 2006. (I can date the onset.) It's as if there was a switch in my head that got thrown into the No Sleep position. Until I was able to get the medicine for it -- around 6 weeks later -- it was horrifying. None of those little checklist things they so confidently prescribe -- get out of bed, take a bath, dim lights in the evening, no caffeine -- do anything at all.

It isn't obvious why some people can sleep and some can't. But there are quacks out there claiming to help insomniacs. What helps, unfortunately, are chemicals. And they eventually erode your ... memory.
 
2014-03-03 02:15:21 PM
Rick Romero?
 
2014-03-03 02:17:10 PM

macross87: Rick Romero?


i190.photobucket.com
 
2014-03-03 02:32:26 PM
I lie awake nights worrying about hypersomnia.

www.geekarmada.com
/i'm here all week
 
2014-03-03 02:34:30 PM
FoxNews is stupid enough on their own, subster; no need to take at them shot here.  Unless you're a greenlight whore.
/off to get a coffee, I haven't slept right in weeks
 
2014-03-03 02:41:19 PM

yakmans_dad: I've had insomnia since Thanksgiving 2006. (I can date the onset.) It's as if there was a switch in my head that got thrown into the No Sleep position. Until I was able to get the medicine for it -- around 6 weeks later -- it was horrifying. None of those little checklist things they so confidently prescribe -- get out of bed, take a bath, dim lights in the evening, no caffeine -- do anything at all.

It isn't obvious why some people can sleep and some can't. But there are quacks out there claiming to help insomniacs. What helps, unfortunately, are chemicals. And they eventually erode your ... memory.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suvorexant

Keep an eye out for that one coming out. It basically makes you sleepy the same way a narcoleptic's brain makes them sleepy (it's a hypocretin antagonist). I've been watching it just because I'm waiting for someone to come up with a hypocretin agonist for narcoleptics (or for someone to make flumazenil in a format suitable for hypersomniacs instead of benzo overdoses).
 
2014-03-03 02:43:50 PM

gopher321: I heard that people with a toothache have trouble chewing. Is it true?


Ever tried chewing with a cut tongue? I think that is even harder to deal with.
 
2014-03-03 02:46:07 PM
Yeah, considering the source, i'm going to have to assume the opposite may be true.
 
2014-03-03 02:54:37 PM
Can't sleep?  Get a cuddly feline. the purring and warmth next to me knocks me out.  Pretty soothing and relaxing.
 
2014-03-03 02:57:52 PM

Sin_City_Superhero: I don't know why subby used the OBVIOUS tag for a Fox"News" article. Nothing is obvious to those people...


you should wipe the spittle from your chin
 
2014-03-03 02:59:49 PM

litespeed74: Can't sleep?  Get a cuddly feline. the purring and warmth next to me knocks me out.  Pretty soothing and relaxing.


God, me too. Our cat is usually really antisocial but when he lays down on my chest, I can hardly hold me head up.
 
2014-03-03 03:00:56 PM
It's not that I suffer from insomnia it's that my dreams scare the sandman.
 
2014-03-03 03:08:05 PM
Google fatal familial insomnia.  There's a fun one.  Luckily, it's exceedingly rare.
 
2014-03-03 03:08:33 PM

Guns n' Farkin Roses: In a small study, researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine studied the brain activity of 28 participants...

I used to smoke pot with Johnny Hopkins.


Funny, as Johnny and you stumbled onto my favorite way of dealing with insomnia.
 
2014-03-03 03:10:56 PM
"I'm sorry, boss. It's not that I suffer from narcolepsy. You're just boring as shiat, is all."
 
2014-03-03 03:15:55 PM
zulius:   Ever tried chewing with a cut tongue? I think that is even harder to deal with.


Nature's way of telling you that you're putting your tongue somewhere it doesn't belong.
 
2014-03-03 03:25:21 PM

doloresonthedottedline: litespeed74: Can't sleep?  Get a cuddly feline. the purring and warmth next to me knocks me out.  Pretty soothing and relaxing.

God, me too. Our cat is usually really antisocial but when he lays down on my chest, I can hardly hold me head up.


Jesus H Christ on a cracker, sometimes it takes me until 2 or 3 to fall asleep.  My cat meows at 4 in the morning wanting to be fed, and when I don't hear her or just ignore her she claws my foot and bites me until I get up and feed her.  When she's done eating she wants to run around the house and meow as loud as she can which wakes my kids up (my oldest is now 3).
I get her attention and bring her to the bathroom and I shower for work while she calms down.   Pets that need to be fed or let out are not sleep helpers.  They're slow killers
 
2014-03-03 03:25:38 PM

doloresonthedottedline: litespeed74: Can't sleep?  Get a cuddly feline. the purring and warmth next to me knocks me out.  Pretty soothing and relaxing.

God, me too. Our cat is usually really antisocial but when he lays down on my chest, I can hardly hold me head up.


My cat is a 20 pound Maine Coon. When he's on my chest it's not the purring that makes me sleep, it's the oxygen deprivation.
 
2014-03-03 03:36:18 PM
Alcoholism cures insomnia.
 
2014-03-03 03:36:23 PM

Guns n' Farkin Roses: In a small study, researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine studied the brain activity of 28 participants...

I used to smoke pot with Johnny Hopkins.


I once smoked fake pot with the real Peter Frampton..
 
2014-03-03 03:38:50 PM

yakmans_dad: I've had insomnia since Thanksgiving 2006. (I can date the onset.) It's as if there was a switch in my head that got thrown into the No Sleep position. Until I was able to get the medicine for it -- around 6 weeks later -- it was horrifying. None of those little checklist things they so confidently prescribe -- get out of bed, take a bath, dim lights in the evening, no caffeine -- do anything at all.

It isn't obvious why some people can sleep and some can't. But there are quacks out there claiming to help insomniacs. What helps, unfortunately, are chemicals. And they eventually erode your ... memory.


Nope... I routinely take a bath because I have a bad back. It actually wakes me back up for another 45 minutes or an hour afterwards. I really don't LIKE light, so my room is always pretty dim, unless we're helping the kids with homework or doing something like sorting laundry. And almost always, I'm reading before bed, as opposed to watching TV. The biggest benefit to my Nook is that the glowlight on the screen can be set low and is nice on my eyes.

If I don't take anything, I still sleep almost exactly 20 minutes, and then sit there for anywhere from 2-3 hours feeling totally refreshed. If I were to try and be one of those 'I don't need sleep' people, it wouldn't work, though. Ambien kinda works, except if I take 1 of them, it lasts 6 hours from when I took it(Not when I go to sleep), and then I'm on like a light switch at 3-4 am. I take 2 and at least I sleep through the night, but I'm not sure I won't also sleep through an earthquake, a fire, or a friggin' break-in.
 
2014-03-03 03:41:09 PM

UtileDysfunktion: zulius:   Ever tried chewing with a cut tongue? I think that is even harder to deal with.


Nature's way of telling you that you're putting your tongue somewhere one it doesn't belong.


FTFY
 
2014-03-03 03:42:14 PM

doloresonthedottedline: litespeed74: Can't sleep?  Get a cuddly feline. the purring and warmth next to me knocks me out.  Pretty soothing and relaxing.

God, me too. Our cat is usually really antisocial but when he lays down on my chest, I can hardly hold me head up.


They have that power, they exercise it on you so they can suck your soul out as you sleep.
 
2014-03-03 03:47:07 PM

yakmans_dad: I've had insomnia since Thanksgiving 2006. (I can date the onset.) It's as if there was a switch in my head that got thrown into the No Sleep position. Until I was able to get the medicine for it -- around 6 weeks later -- it was horrifying. None of those little checklist things they so confidently prescribe -- get out of bed, take a bath, dim lights in the evening, no caffeine -- do anything at all.

It isn't obvious why some people can sleep and some can't. But there are quacks out there claiming to help insomniacs. What helps, unfortunately, are chemicals. And they eventually erode your ... memory.


I am not alone. My insomia is horrifyingly bad. The longest stretch - 11 days and nights without sleep. Oddly, I didn't go bonkers. That really puzzles the sleep clinic and other doctors.
 
2014-03-03 03:50:20 PM

doloresonthedottedline: yakmans_dad: I've had insomnia since Thanksgiving 2006. (I can date the onset.) It's as if there was a switch in my head that got thrown into the No Sleep position. Until I was able to get the medicine for it -- around 6 weeks later -- it was horrifying. None of those little checklist things they so confidently prescribe -- get out of bed, take a bath, dim lights in the evening, no caffeine -- do anything at all.

It isn't obvious why some people can sleep and some can't. But there are quacks out there claiming to help insomniacs. What helps, unfortunately, are chemicals. And they eventually erode your ... memory.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suvorexant

Keep an eye out for that one coming out. It basically makes you sleepy the same way a narcoleptic's brain makes them sleepy (it's a hypocretin antagonist). I've been watching it just because I'm waiting for someone to come up with a hypocretin agonist for narcoleptics (or for someone to make flumazenil in a format suitable for hypersomniacs instead of benzo overdoses).


I had been treated for years for insomnia.  I couldn't fall asleep until 4 or 5am no matter how long I'd been awake nor what time I went to bed.  I lived since about the age of 13 on 2-4hrs a night of sleep, with occasional 24hr sleep crashes.  I would occasionally fall asleep during the day for "micro naps" for 1-5 minutes at a time, even when it was very inconvenient (such as driving or at my desk at work).  I tried all the normal things (no caffienne/nicotine, no TV/Computer after 9pm, no eating after 7, etc...)  It wasn't until they got me on low doses of Doxe-Pin (10-20mg) along with 20mg of melatonin that I've even been able to make any sort of sleep progress.

CSB time

I am a large man.  The somonologist insisted that I had apnea and snored and that was the problem.  I kept trying to tell him that I had no problem staying asleep once I finally fell asleep and that nothing short of an earthquake or icewater in the face would wake me once I actually hit a deep sleep, but they didn't want to hear it.  I finally got one that agreed to do a full sleep study (not just an APAP test).
   After the 9hr test (9pm-6am) They came in the morning and asked "How long do you think you slept?"  I said "3, maybe 4hrs, tops."  The tech said "The machine shows you got 8hrs of sleep, but 80% of it was Stage I, 15% was Stage II, 5% in Stage III, and none in REM."  I replied with, "well, I can tell you that isn't true.  I can tell you the score of the Pirates game I watched, then the end of the Patriots-Eagles pre-season game, the 3 episodes of family guy, 3 more of American Dad, and 2 infomercials I watched all trying to fall asleep.
   When I met with the doctor 2 weeks later around noon to discuss the results, he was shocked that not only could I tell him the scores of the games, but which episodes I watched and the products on the commercials.  Even though I had been clinically asleep, I was fully conscious.  He hooked up 6 or 8 electrodes in the office and checked me again there.  My brain was still in Stage I sleep, even though I'd been awake and at work for the last 4hrs.  He figured out that my brain was stuck in Stage I to accommodate the fact that I was only getting 3-4hrs of sleep a night most of my adult life.  I had basically adapted to be fully productive while sleep walking so as not to go insane.
   Since going on the Doxe-Pin/Melatonin regiment, I can fall asleep between 1 and 2am... which is light years better than 4-5am.  It's been about 6 months and I'm just starting to build up a drug resistance to the pills.  But it's been some of the most restful 6 months I can ever remember.
 
2014-03-03 03:51:36 PM

Random Anonymous Blackmail: Alcoholism cures insomnia.


Yes it does.  For most of college (and several years after), the only way I could get a full night's sleep was to drink until i passed out.  Unfortunately, 8hrs of drunken sleep is not good sleep and really isn't that effective (nor was it good on my liver).
 
2014-03-03 03:53:25 PM

philodough: I am not alone. My insomia is horrifyingly bad. The longest stretch - 11 days and nights without sleep. Oddly, I didn't go bonkers. That really puzzles the sleep clinic and other doctors.


See my long post above.  After being tested, they found out that my brain had adapted to the lack of sleep.  I had done 4 separate dance marathons (THON for those PSU grads in the thread) and staying awake was never an issue.  I'd be awake for 70ish hours and cap it off by going to the bar immediately after.
 
2014-03-03 03:57:39 PM

Guns n' Farkin Roses: In a small study, researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine studied the brain activity of 28 participants...

I used to smoke pot with Johnny Hopkins.


Bogarter?
 
2014-03-03 04:09:00 PM
It's been about twenty-five years since I slept well, consistently. If I get four good nights of sleep a week, I'm doing well. It either takes me hours to fall asleep, or I fall asleep fairly quickly, and then I'm awake from about 1 till 4 a.m. Or both. Or I just lie there all night, and fall asleep around 4:00, to get up at 6:30. Half the week I'm going on about four hours of sleep from the night before.

So I'm getting a real kick out of this article.
 
2014-03-03 04:28:35 PM

Guns n' Farkin Roses: In a small study, researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine studied the brain activity of 28 participants...

I used to smoke pot with Johnny Hopkins.


You don't even know a John Hopkins.
 
2014-03-03 04:48:26 PM
I find my insomnia is greatly reduced on cardio days.  When you start with a 6 mile sprint on the bike in under 20 minutes you're not going to have trouble sleeping.
 
2014-03-03 04:56:57 PM

abmoraz: doloresonthedottedline: yakmans_dad: I've had insomnia since Thanksgiving 2006. (I can date the onset.) It's as if there was a switch in my head that got thrown into the No Sleep position. Until I was able to get the medicine for it -- around 6 weeks later -- it was horrifying. None of those little checklist things they so confidently prescribe -- get out of bed, take a bath, dim lights in the evening, no caffeine -- do anything at all.

It isn't obvious why some people can sleep and some can't. But there are quacks out there claiming to help insomniacs. What helps, unfortunately, are chemicals. And they eventually erode your ... memory.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suvorexant

Keep an eye out for that one coming out. It basically makes you sleepy the same way a narcoleptic's brain makes them sleepy (it's a hypocretin antagonist). I've been watching it just because I'm waiting for someone to come up with a hypocretin agonist for narcoleptics (or for someone to make flumazenil in a format suitable for hypersomniacs instead of benzo overdoses).

I had been treated for years for insomnia.  I couldn't fall asleep until 4 or 5am no matter how long I'd been awake nor what time I went to bed.  I lived since about the age of 13 on 2-4hrs a night of sleep, with occasional 24hr sleep crashes.  I would occasionally fall asleep during the day for "micro naps" for 1-5 minutes at a time, even when it was very inconvenient (such as driving or at my desk at work).  I tried all the normal things (no caffienne/nicotine, no TV/Computer after 9pm, no eating after 7, etc...)  It wasn't until they got me on low doses of Doxe-Pin (10-20mg) along with 20mg of melatonin that I've even been able to make any sort of sleep progress.

CSB time

I am a large man.  The somonologist insisted that I had apnea and snored and that was the problem.  I kept trying to tell him that I had no problem staying asleep once I finally fell asleep and that nothing short of an earthquake or icewater in the face ...


Wow. This is going to sound probably dumb and crazy but I've been wondering for a very long time if that was possible. I have narcolepsy and was on Xyrem for a long time, until I started getting HORRIBLE insomnia. Xyrem is GHB, I was on the max dose, and I didn't sleep. Think it may have been around the time I became hypothyroid, not sure, I didn't get diagnosed and treated for that for another two-ish years. Anyway, I still get insomnia off and on, I'm off Xyrem now, but on the nights I can't sleep, I feel like I've slept some. I'll be watching the clock, reading things, doing things, and in the morning feel like I had to've slept. But I know I didn't. The same thing was happening when I was on Xyrem--I couldn't fall asleep on the doses, but when they wore off I felt like I'd had sleep. At the time I thought it was just because it's a stimulant in lower doses, but the same thing happens now that I've been off it for a long time.

My sleep is all kinds of messed up, though. Sleep study showed narcolepsy (REM sleep three times during the MSLT, sleep latency under 10 minutes, cataplexy, etc etc), but my current doctor is treating me for hypersomnia with long sleep time which they're thinking is more related to GABA receptors being overly sensitive (sort of like being on benzos at all times).
 
2014-03-03 04:58:29 PM

Smeggy Smurf: I find my insomnia is greatly reduced on cardio days.  When you start with a 6 mile sprint on the bike in under 20 minutes you're not going to have trouble sleeping.


Not for everyone. Glad it helps you, though.
 
2014-03-03 05:08:31 PM

Sass-O-Rev: It's been about twenty-five years since I slept well, consistently. If I get four good nights of sleep a week, I'm doing well. It either takes me hours to fall asleep, or I fall asleep fairly quickly, and then I'm awake from about 1 till 4 a.m. Or both. Or I just lie there all night, and fall asleep around 4:00, to get up at 6:30. Half the week I'm going on about four hours of sleep from the night before.

So I'm getting a real kick out of this article.


Try 4 hours a week. I'm a walking vegetable. I think it forced my body and brain into survival mode long ago because I'm still standing. Most certainly will die young.
 
2014-03-03 05:08:38 PM

philodough: yakmans_dad: I've had insomnia since Thanksgiving 2006. (I can date the onset.) It's as if there was a switch in my head that got thrown into the No Sleep position. Until I was able to get the medicine for it -- around 6 weeks later -- it was horrifying. None of those little checklist things they so confidently prescribe -- get out of bed, take a bath, dim lights in the evening, no caffeine -- do anything at all.

It isn't obvious why some people can sleep and some can't. But there are quacks out there claiming to help insomniacs. What helps, unfortunately, are chemicals. And they eventually erode your ... memory.

I am not alone. My insomia is horrifyingly bad. The longest stretch - 11 days and nights without sleep. Oddly, I didn't go bonkers. That really puzzles the sleep clinic and other doctors.


Lots of links here:  http://www.researchgate.net/post/What_about_the_orexin_hypocretin_rec e ptors_antagonists_for_the_treatment_of_insomnia

Orexin/hypocretin antagonists basically put you in the state narcoleptics are in. Should put you to sleep. Looks like there's one close to being released. The biggest concern is that it'll cause cataplexy but according to that, it hasn't yet. Which is actually pretty weird, but good for insomniacs.
 
2014-03-03 05:26:58 PM
This headline makes me want to see Fight Club in the form of a DirectTV commercial where cable is the root cause of Ed Norton's insomnia.
 
2014-03-03 05:32:23 PM

philodough: Sass-O-Rev: It's been about twenty-five years since I slept well, consistently. If I get four good nights of sleep a week, I'm doing well. It either takes me hours to fall asleep, or I fall asleep fairly quickly, and then I'm awake from about 1 till 4 a.m. Or both. Or I just lie there all night, and fall asleep around 4:00, to get up at 6:30. Half the week I'm going on about four hours of sleep from the night before.

So I'm getting a real kick out of this article.

Try 4 hours a week. I'm a walking vegetable. I think it forced my body and brain into survival mode long ago because I'm still standing. Most certainly will die young.


oh no..... that sucks.  Really, really sorry to hear that-- I hope things improve for you. Any idea what's behind that? I have a few ideas about what causes my sleep problems, but holy crow... they're not nearly as bad as yours.
 
2014-03-03 05:36:55 PM
I've had chronic insomnia for 30 years.  I'd sleep no more than a few hours a night until I thought I was going to go insane then just crash on the weekend and basically not get out of bed.  Self medicating with alcohol helped when I was old enough.  Now a nice combination of a high dose of halcion (yeah you shouldn't be on benzos for a long time but it works for me and the doctor is monitoring me and nothing else worked), a fairly high dose of topamax that I am also on for something else, and a light box (happy light!).   It is only in the last year that I'm finally sleeping, and it is wonderful.  Now if I could find a non-cpap snoring solution that insurance would pay for.

Ever since about the age of 3, night time was me laying in bed for 2 or 3 hours staring at the ceiling, waiting for sleep to happen.  It wasn't that my brain wouldn't turn off, sleep just wouldn't turn on.
 
2014-03-03 05:48:13 PM

doloresonthedottedline: I became hypothyroid


I have hypothyroidism as well.  They think it's been that was since I hit puberty and I went over 20 years without anyone diagnosing it (everyone just assumed I was a fat, lazy fark who ate too much even though I played hockey, tennis, baseball, and hiked regularly).  My free T4 is about 25% below the threshhold.  Sleep issues is a common side effect of thyroid issues, as the thyroid helps regulate your circadian rhythm.  My rhythm is closer to 30-32 hours rather than the 24-25 hour norm.  My body naturally wants to sleep for 6-8hrs, then be awake for about 24.  When I was unemployed (or on extended vacation) that's the natural sleep pattern I fall into.
 
2014-03-03 05:57:41 PM

Smeggy Smurf: I find my insomnia is greatly reduced on cardio days.  When you start with a 6 mile sprint on the bike in under 20 minutes you're not going to have trouble sleeping.


I had the opposite effect.  Days I worked out or played multiple hockey games were the hardest to sleep.  My body was physically beat (I couldn't get up and move), but my brain was wide awake.

I think many people who don't have insomnia don't understand the difference between "exhausted" (physically tired) and "sleepy" (mentally tired).  I can't sleep because my brain won't shut off.  I can stare at the ceiling for HOURS, even if my body is so tired that I'm near paralyzed.

My insomnia sometimes get so bad that I experience minor seizures (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myoclonus ) that will cause my head to swing back and forth for several seconds or my shoulders and neck to "flutter".  They are similar to breathing in that they are involuntary, but I can stop them for a short time if I concentrate hard enough on them.  They really freak out people around me who see them.

They are natural for people who are already sleeping, but if you read my previous post, my brain often gets stuck in clinical sleep mode while I'm fully conscious and mobile.  It's not epilepsy, but a physical manifestation of a sleep disorder.
 
2014-03-03 06:25:31 PM

abmoraz: doloresonthedottedline: I became hypothyroid

I have hypothyroidism as well.  They think it's been that was since I hit puberty and I went over 20 years without anyone diagnosing it (everyone just assumed I was a fat, lazy fark who ate too much even though I played hockey, tennis, baseball, and hiked regularly).  My free T4 is about 25% below the threshhold.  Sleep issues is a common side effect of thyroid issues, as the thyroid helps regulate your circadian rhythm.  My rhythm is closer to 30-32 hours rather than the 24-25 hour norm.  My body naturally wants to sleep for 6-8hrs, then be awake for about 24.  When I was unemployed (or on extended vacation) that's the natural sleep pattern I fall into.


I don't feel rested until I've had 11-12 hours. After that I feel pretty normal, ready to get up, but I get sleepy really fast right after. I had narcolepsy before my thyroid messed up (numbers were normal), but I think I was hyperthyroid for a bit when I couldn't stop losing weight. Then I started gaining really, really, really fast. Stretch marks are so bad they tested for Cushing's. Got horrible depression too, which I've never struggled with. That plus the insomnia made it super hard to take the thyroid meds regularly. Once I finally took them enough to not be depressed, I could tell really easily when I'd missed a pill because my mood would get bad.

People always talk about "thyroid condition" like it's an excuse for getting fat. But I felt like I was absolutely starving. I couldn't think of anything but food (especially red meat, for some reason), and I couldn't sleep, so there were even more hours to think about food. I was too foggy-headed to do anything distracting, and going *DOWN* a flight of stairs left me absolutely exhausted. I didn't just get out of shape, either. I lived on the third story of an old Victorian house and had to walk everywhere I went, including 3+ trips to the grocery store because I had to carry whatever I bought back. I went from being fine with that to struggling to even get down the stairs to just leave.
 
2014-03-03 06:28:23 PM

abmoraz: I think many people who don't have insomnia don't understand the difference between "exhausted" (physically tired) and "sleepy" (mentally tired).  I can't sleep because my brain won't shut off.  I can stare at the ceiling for HOURS, even if my body is so tired that I'm near paralyzed.



Took me 9 years to even be tested for a sleep disorder because I didn't know the difference. I told doctors I was exhausted all the time. They apparently never considered I might mean "sleepy." And I'd been sleepy for so long that I didn't realize there was a difference. Just sleepy, and more sleepy.
 
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