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(WorldNetDaily)   Double the tinfoil helmets, this could be a bumpy ride: Conservatives might be shocked to hear their 'conservative' Jeb Bush is joining forces with Bill Gates to implement "Common Core" school indoctrination   (wnd.com) divider line 162
    More: Interesting, Common Core, Jeb Bush, Bill Gates, Obama, race to the top, private schools, Thomas B. Fordham Institute, Secretary of Education  
•       •       •

1233 clicks; posted to Politics » on 02 Mar 2014 at 4:43 PM (52 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



162 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-03-02 04:46:03 PM  
Well where there's a rich old white guy, there's a way, right?!
 
2014-03-02 04:48:03 PM  
Yeah so much for Jeb Bush being in the background like everything thinks he's doing.
 
2014-03-02 04:59:51 PM  
I can understand people not thinking the common core is a high enough standard (I mean, it's intentionally the minimum acceptable standard at which you can even call an institution a "school", that's the point, really), but the people freaking out about it because it's "unfair", i.e. too  hard, are... kind of a puzzle.

I mean, it's hard to conceive of people that stupid, like, surviving to adulthood and successfully working out how reproduction works.  So the objection just... doesn't make sense, it's like being against Hitler because the guy is just too goshdarn soft on those Jews.
 
2014-03-02 05:01:22 PM  
Two WND links today, double down on stupid Sunday I guess.
 
2014-03-02 05:07:08 PM  
Weird how 7 year olds are held to high standards but corporations fight against higher standards all the time.
 
2014-03-02 05:09:41 PM  

theteacher: Weird how 7 year olds are held to high standards but corporations fight against higher standards all the time.


Bill Gates wants cameras in every classroom. I say cameras in every meeting he has.
 
2014-03-02 05:11:12 PM  
Google "Florida FCAT test" and see how well that panned out.
 
2014-03-02 05:11:44 PM  

Jim_Callahan: I can understand people not thinking the common core is a high enough standard (I mean, it's intentionally the minimum acceptable standard at which you can even call an institution a "school", that's the point, really), but the people freaking out about it because it's "unfair", i.e. too  hard, are... kind of a puzzle.

I mean, it's hard to conceive of people that stupid, like, surviving to adulthood and successfully working out how reproduction works.  So the objection just... doesn't make sense, it's like being against Hitler because the guy is just too goshdarn soft on those Jews.


Education just terrifies Republicans
 
2014-03-02 05:13:29 PM  
FTA: ...which some are even calling "ObamaCore."

*blink*

[idontwanttoliveonthisplanetanymore.jpg]
 
2014-03-02 05:13:39 PM  
A return to Bobbitt and Charters is in order, particularly with all the immigrants.
 
2014-03-02 05:16:35 PM  
Ah, Common Core, an education plan created with virtually no input from educators, from the founder of Microsoft's foundation that just happens to require computer-based testing so districts in 48 states have to invest millions in computers, virtually all of which will run Windows.
 
2014-03-02 05:18:26 PM  
Come talk to me when your new standards that promote "higher-order thinking" aren't assessed with a state-made standardized exam.

/teacher
 
2014-03-02 05:19:25 PM  

Jim_Callahan: but the people freaking out about it because it's "unfair", i.e. too  hard, are... kind of a puzzle.


They're not terrified of it because it is "too hard".

Here is the story...
1.bp.blogspot.com

Jeb and BillyG aren't pushing it because they want higher standards. They are pushing it as a means of destroying public education...


Which is what the conservatives have been wanting since day 1.
 
2014-03-02 05:21:00 PM  
It's not just that Common Core is your minimal standard, it's become the only standard. Nothing else matters except the test because they're using it to grade schools and teachers. Many schools have great teachers that are capable of teaching at a far more in depth level, but because the school is worried about the test scores, teachers no only concentrate on the test bed and nothing else.

Why is that bad? Because it's memorization. It's teachers throwing subject matter at kids that pertains to the test but not enough time to explain the hows and whys. We are giving up creativity, improvisation, and innovation in exchange for memorization on a standardized test. We have bright kids that can learn the understanding of a subject matter and use that understanding to solve problems or create answers. Instead, we drop the opportunity for teachers to enrich that in kids. And we wonder why kids are "getting dumber" and our research sector is scouring for applicants.

Common Core is also bad for kids for a couple reasons. It's demoralizing. Yeah, yeah, before your "Precious snowflake" comments start in, the first thing they do with kids is give them a test. Yes, they need a baseline to see what a kid knows so they can see progress as they go through classes. However, the first thing a kid experiences with school is a standardized test designed for them to fail because it's on subjects they've never learned. My kid started kindergarten this year. He was excited for school but walked out of his K registration brokenhearted because of how poorly he scored on the test. When it's close to test time and they start drilling the kids, he doesn't want to go to school anymore. That's exactly how we want our kids to view education.

It's also bad because they're expecting them to learn things that they are not developmentally ready for. They want Kindergartners reading low-level books by the end of the year. They're too young for that. Yes, if you drill them enough, they can do it, but it frustrates them to a point that they don't want to do it. That's because their brains aren't there yet. Kindergarten should be learning behavior and social skills and your basic skills so that in 1st grade, they're ready to go.

Don't even give me the time to talk about the big push in learning "sight words" and punish them for using phonics to figure out how to read a word.
 
2014-03-02 05:21:38 PM  
Guess Jeb just lost the nomination.
 
2014-03-02 05:23:22 PM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: Ah, Common Core, an education plan created with virtually no input from educators, from the founder of Microsoft's foundation that just happens to require computer-based testing so districts in 48 states have to invest millions in computers, virtually all of which will run Windows.


You... you don't think that state education departments.... have computers?  And you think obtaining them represents some kind of major financial burden for state governments?

Man, I knew there are people whose ISP involves a time portal from the 1990s, but I didn't know anyone's time portal went all the way back to the ENIAC days.

How's that McCarthy fellow working out for ya?

// Seriously, though, computer-based testing is mostly being advocated because it will save everyone an assload of money, and no one (sane) actually thinks that it won't save said money, there are too many examples of going electronic doing exactly that.  You're making another complaint that's somehow complaining about the exact opposite of reality here.
 
2014-03-02 05:25:42 PM  
No one should be shocked, especially when it comes to one of the Bush clan. Ignite! this

Extra points for anyone who can figure out what the baby Bushes and Pee will be doing in South America.
 
2014-03-02 05:30:52 PM  
Wait, I thought for-profit schools were good?
 
2014-03-02 05:32:30 PM  

maddogdelta: Jim_Callahan: but the people freaking out about it because it's "unfair", i.e. too  hard, are... kind of a puzzle.

They're not terrified of it because it is "too hard".

Here is the story...
[1.bp.blogspot.com image 415x1500]

Jeb and BillyG aren't pushing it because they want higher standards. They are pushing it as a means of destroying public education...


Which is what the conservatives have been wanting since day 1.


That's not really a complaint about common core, it's a complaint about charter schools.  What you should be advocating against is the silly voucher plans, not curriculum standards.  Especially not curriculum standards that the vast majority of state standards currently exceed by a significant margin.

It is at least a legit complaint about an actual issue in education policy, though, I guess.  Just not about common core, the connection to curriculum standards ("opens the door to privatization") isn't an argument, it's the slippery slope fallacy.  Which is great for conspiracy theorizing but not really a good policy argument.

I would generally agree that the nation's experimentation with charter schools is basically a bust, though.  They hit about the same average quality-wise as public schools, but with a much larger "spread", so for every really good one like the MagNet programs you have one or two terrible ones that teach that no one knows where electricity comes from therefore Jesus.  It's probably time to nix the generalized charter/voucher systems and move back to basic publics plus one or two specialized academies here and there.

// Not that the experiment wasn't worth trying, but the results are the results and Charters empirically are paying more money for the same quality of education overall.
 
2014-03-02 05:32:38 PM  
I think the whole Bush family should be introduced to Common Core standards.

For example:

This should be Jeb.

i.telegraph.co.uk

This should be George.

images.politico.com
 
2014-03-02 05:41:53 PM  
Common Core isn't that tricky folks. The testing is the trickier part, but the common core standards really aren't. This might be an exaggeration, but if the standard is for a graduating senior to be able to write a research paper with citations, etc then that standars is broken down into smaller parts at each grade level.

Many of the complaints in this thread seemed to be geared more towards the current system (teaching to the test, etc)
 
2014-03-02 05:43:19 PM  

FunkyBlue: It's not just that Common Core is your minimal standard, it's become the only standard. Nothing else matters except the test because they're using it to grade schools and teachers. Many schools have great teachers that are capable of teaching at a far more in depth level, but because the school is worried about the test scores, teachers no only concentrate on the test bed and nothing else.

Why is that bad? Because it's memorization. It's teachers throwing subject matter at kids that pertains to the test but not enough time to explain the hows and whys. We are giving up creativity, improvisation, and innovation in exchange for memorization on a standardized test. We have bright kids that can learn the understanding of a subject matter and use that understanding to solve problems or create answers. Instead, we drop the opportunity for teachers to enrich that in kids. And we wonder why kids are "getting dumber" and our research sector is scouring for applicants.

Common Core is also bad for kids for a couple reasons. It's demoralizing. Yeah, yeah, before your "Precious snowflake" comments start in, the first thing they do with kids is give them a test. Yes, they need a baseline to see what a kid knows so they can see progress as they go through classes. However, the first thing a kid experiences with school is a standardized test designed for them to fail because it's on subjects they've never learned. My kid started kindergarten this year. He was excited for school but walked out of his K registration brokenhearted because of how poorly he scored on the test. When it's close to test time and they start drilling the kids, he doesn't want to go to school anymore. That's exactly how we want our kids to view education.

It's also bad because they're expecting them to learn things that they are not developmentally ready for. They want Kindergartners reading low-level books by the end of the year. They're too young for that. Yes, if you drill them enough, they can do it, b ...


All of these. Plus more. It does no good at all for kids to be "good at math" if they cannot apply it, to be "good at science" if they cannot implement it. More and more we're seeing students lurch out of K-12 education with zero idea how to USE the skills they've got, first of all, and second of all, having never been given the opportunity to try and fail at things by experimentation, they don't know WHY these things are so critical. They can't think. They can't synthesize. They can't tell you how to take a boxful of parts and make something out of it unless someone is there to help them, and they're unable to try.

So here's a question I've never heard asked and maybe someone can answer it: So the US is ranked lower in math and science than many other industrial nations. Why does that matter? Why should we care? America has a literacy rate of between 97 and 99% according to the CIA Factbook. So South Korea is "better" than we are--when was the last time any important technical or scientific innovations came out of South Korea? Why are we putting so much emphasis on test scores, and not on what students are DOING with those skills? Just because you drag middle school kids kicking and screaming through algebra so that they'll score higher on the STARS test doesn't mean they go on to become engineers or rocket scientists. So why bother?
 
2014-03-02 05:43:42 PM  

FunkyBlue: It's not just that Common Core is your minimal standard, it's become the only standard. Nothing else matters except the test because they're using it to grade schools and teachers. Many schools have great teachers that are capable of teaching at a far more in depth level, but because the school is worried about the test scores, teachers no only concentrate on the test bed and nothing else.

Why is that bad? Because it's memorization. It's teachers throwing subject matter at kids that pertains to the test but not enough time to explain the hows and whys. We are giving up creativity, improvisation, and innovation in exchange for memorization on a standardized test. We have bright kids that can learn the understanding of a subject matter and use that understanding to solve problems or create answers. Instead, we drop the opportunity for teachers to enrich that in kids. And we wonder why kids are "getting dumber" and our research sector is scouring for applicants.

Common Core is also bad for kids for a couple reasons. It's demoralizing. Yeah, yeah, before your "Precious snowflake" comments start in, the first thing they do with kids is give them a test. Yes, they need a baseline to see what a kid knows so they can see progress as they go through classes. However, the first thing a kid experiences with school is a standardized test designed for them to fail because it's on subjects they've never learned. My kid started kindergarten this year. He was excited for school but walked out of his K registration brokenhearted because of how poorly he scored on the test. When it's close to test time and they start drilling the kids, he doesn't want to go to school anymore. That's exactly how we want our kids to view education.

It's also bad because they're expecting them to learn things that they are not developmentally ready for. They want Kindergartners reading low-level books by the end of the year. They're too young for that. Yes, if you drill them enough, they can do it, b ...


The assessment questions I have seen were not simple memorization but drawing meaning from passage(s) and showing evidence with a follow up question to explain where in the source material you derived that meaning. It really is trying to assess critical thinking and promote use of and value of data sources, when some might even conflict.

I am not saying it's perfect, but it was developed at the state level by the governors, the only connection the Obama administration has is in the race to the top funds being tied to adoption of common core. The difficulty, especially in the lower grades is a real issue. I think Grade 1 students should be reading materials at a guided reading level of K at the start of the year, that's a small chapter book!

State proprietary tests are a joke (I am told) in some regions and when scores based on the same types of tests, Common Core has 2 Smarter Balance (computer based) and PARCC (written) it is going to give us the first true picture of where everyone falls.
 
2014-03-02 05:47:43 PM  

Triumph: theteacher: Weird how 7 year olds are held to high standards but corporations fight against higher standards all the time.

Bill Gates wants cameras in every classroom. I say cameras in every meeting he has.


whatisthisidontevenknow.jpg
 
2014-03-02 05:53:45 PM  

Triumph: theteacher: Weird how 7 year olds are held to high standards but corporations fight against higher standards all the time.

Bill Gates wants cameras in every classroom. I say cameras in every meeting he has.


What's wrong with cameras in classrooms?
 
2014-03-02 05:59:36 PM  

Jim_Callahan: That's not really a complaint about common core,


Actually, it is.  There were some noises made that what gets taught in California should be what is taught in South Carolina.  OK. That's a good idea.

Now BillyG and Pearson get together and make up the "Common Core" standards, which had no input from educators, only from corporations.  Nothing to indicate their soundness pedagogically.  Just a big "here are the standards, if you don't like them, fark you!" and now the rest of us have to deal with it.
 
2014-03-02 06:03:18 PM  
www.washingtonpost.com

Why do they have British teeth?
 
2014-03-02 06:04:36 PM  

Gotfire: [www.washingtonpost.com image 606x395]

Why do they have British teeth?


Dammit.  Sorry wrong thread.
 
2014-03-02 06:07:25 PM  

Yakk: The assessment questions I have seen were not simple memorization but drawing meaning from passage(s) and showing evidence with a follow up question to explain where in the source material you derived that meaning. It really is trying to assess critical thinking and promote use of and value of data sources, when some might even conflict.


The assessment questions I have seen were not simple memorization either but these were not drawing meaning or showing evidence but rather convoluted questions, especially Part B for the reading questions. Nothing about them is critical thinking because critical thinking is not possible with convergent answers.

While I appreciate the reduction in content and focus on process found in Common Core, the assessments are still ridiculous wastes of time, effort, funds, sanity, and analysis. We know what makes good teachers. We know what makes students succeed. What assessments on this broad of a scale must be used for is to find out what good teachers are doing to make students succeed, and yet this is the last interest of this accountability movement.

Meanwhile, in actual classrooms, when one of my colleagues realizes students did not understand a concept, whatever the assessment, others offer assistance with activities, with methods, and however else, but none of them have the extra time or resources or procedures to assist in a way which is significant.
 
2014-03-02 06:07:59 PM  

maddogdelta: Now BillyG and Pearson get together and make up the "Common Core" standards, which had no input from educators, only from corporations.  N


Do you have a citation on this? You're telling me that they don't even use educators as consultants?

Granted, privatized schools are of concern, but I would like to know what you mean by "destroying education."
 
2014-03-02 06:17:06 PM  
So it's another author shilling his book disguised as an article.  Does WND put out anything that isn't a hidden advertisement?
 
2014-03-02 06:20:03 PM  
Well, there are billions to be made in boring small children. They have to come up with new methods and retrain teachers every three years to make sure there isn't any consistency.
 
2014-03-02 06:26:06 PM  
maddogdelta:

Now BillyG and Pearson get together and make up the "Common Core" standards, which had no input from educators, only from corporations.

That's not true at all.
 
2014-03-02 06:28:07 PM  

whidbey: Do you have a citation on this? You're telling me that they don't even use educators as consultants?

Granted, privatized schools are of concern, but I would like to know what you mean by "destroying education."


Well, start with Wikipedia. I'll let you track their sources.  The last time I checked, the National Governors Association was not a professional organization for school teachers.

Diane Ravitch was an early supporter of NCLB, until the data indicated that NCLB was hurting more than helping.   Here is where her research led her.

The destruction of public education is the basic agenda of the republican party.  The City of New Orleans school system was taken over by the State (Governor Bobby Jindal) and then turned over, almost exclusively, to charter schools.  Every education initiative from the republican party is full of "charter schools", "vouchers" and other corporate takeover of education.

And what sucks the most about it is that Obama has bought into this crap.  Arne Duncan is a complete tool, and he's pushing Race To the Top (complete with stacked evaluations, using student assessments to evaluate teachers, boatloads more charter schools, and Teach For America, which is a whole nother pile of shiat on top of everything else)

scontent-a-sjc.xx.fbcdn.net
 
2014-03-02 06:33:24 PM  

Vangor: The assessment questions I have seen were not simple memorization either but these were not drawing meaning or showing evidence but rather convoluted questions, especially Part B for the reading questions. Nothing about them is critical thinking because critical thinking is not possible with convergent answers.


I've seen some example reading questions from the common core. They're about the same as when I was in school. "This passage is mostly about a)....."

These do nothing to improve student's critical thinking. For starters, there is usually more than one answer that could be convincingly argued, but, more importantly, they fail to give the children the space to argue. The children have to select from a list - they don't get to decide for themselves what the passage is about and then argue their position using the passage for support. Nothing about it is critical thinking.
 
2014-03-02 06:35:01 PM  

Doc Lee: That's not true at all.


Go ahead... look it up...

The only place that says that educators were involved is the Common Core website and people quoting that website.  I linked it before, but here you go.. Diane Ravitch has done quite a bit of homework on this.
 
2014-03-02 06:39:29 PM  

maddogdelta: The last time I checked, the National Governors Association was not a professional organization for school teachers.


To note, while the design and implementation of Common Core, as well as frankly any reform I am able to recall from the last thirty years, is woefully lacking in feedback and input and advocacy from educational practitioners, to say there was "no input from teachers" is disingenuous, and to suggest having the National Governors Association behind the design and implementation of a national standards system is evidence for this when states have individually handled the vast majority of matters related to education is simply being ignorant.

My only complaint about the standards themselves is the continued creep downward, especially when speaking of process-based standards, toward developmentally inappropriate concepts.
 
2014-03-02 06:41:37 PM  

Vangor: My only complaint about the standards themselves is the continued creep downward, especially when speaking of process-based standards, toward developmentally inappropriate concepts.


Is that evidence that professional educators were involved in the process?  I see it as evidence that professional educators were not involved in the process.
 
2014-03-02 06:43:49 PM  
No need to get our panties in a bunch. Common Core will be replaced by something equally inane in approximately 5 years.
 
2014-03-02 06:44:59 PM  

maddogdelta: Vangor: My only complaint about the standards themselves is the continued creep downward, especially when speaking of process-based standards, toward developmentally inappropriate concepts.

Is that evidence that professional educators were involved in the process?  I see it as evidence that professional educators were not involved in the process.


Have you ever tried to collaborate with a group of educators? It's like trying to wrangle feral cats, sometimes.
 
2014-03-02 06:46:30 PM  

Yakk: State proprietary tests are a joke (I am told) in some regions and when scores based on the same types of tests, Common Core has 2 Smarter Balance (computer based) and PARCC (written) it is going to give us the first true picture of where everyone falls.


Minor quibble: PARCC is also computer based. I know because my school is working to get the money together for the computers for this.
 
2014-03-02 06:50:59 PM  

maddogdelta: Doc Lee: That's not true at all.

Go ahead... look it up...

The only place that says that educators were involved is the Common Core website and people quoting that website.  I linked it before, but here you go.. Diane Ravitch has done quite a bit of homework on this.


So you quote the blog of a nobody that reads like it's a conspiracy theorist's blog?  No thanks.

It doesn't even support your own argument.
 
2014-03-02 06:53:05 PM  

Doc Lee: maddogdelta: Doc Lee: That's not true at all.

Go ahead... look it up...

The only place that says that educators were involved is the Common Core website and people quoting that website.  I linked it before, but here you go.. Diane Ravitch has done quite a bit of homework on this.

So you quote the blog of a nobody that reads like it's a conspiracy theorist's blog?  No thanks.

It doesn't even support your own argument.


I'm having trouble with this, too maddogdelta. We don't cite Wikipedia or someone's blogs in climate change threads, either.

How about some peer-reviewed information?
 
2014-03-02 06:53:41 PM  

maddogdelta: Here is where her research led her.


"Engaging the nonsense - a brief investigation of the Common Core"

With a title like that has it occurred to you that the author of said article might have a bias? Or that anyone who would cite an article like that in their crappy blog probably shares that bias? Aside from that all you have is a badly captioned pic to back up your bullshiat. Do you not already see how this is going to go down?
 
2014-03-02 06:55:12 PM  

maddogdelta: Vangor: My only complaint about the standards themselves is the continued creep downward, especially when speaking of process-based standards, toward developmentally inappropriate concepts.

Is that evidence that professional educators were involved in the process?  I see it as evidence that professional educators were not involved in the process.


Maybe it's time we listen to scholars, scientists, psychologists, and people who are professionals in how kids and adolescents ideally learn, and less to teachers unions and individuals who would rather maintain the status quo than change the educational system to keep up with Europe and even India.

And stop paying attention to people who think Young Earthism and Creationism should be taught as science in schools.
 
2014-03-02 06:55:56 PM  

maddogdelta: Vangor: My only complaint about the standards themselves is the continued creep downward, especially when speaking of process-based standards, toward developmentally inappropriate concepts.

Is that evidence that professional educators were involved in the process?  I see it as evidence that professional educators were not involved in the process.


Our disagreement is on the use of absolutes. Practitioners were involved but not enough, and, as this has become further and further entrenched in politics and organizations and such, this has further thinned and washed away.

However, in my experience, there are not enough educators who understand development, especially in connection to tasks both in assignment, what is appropriate for a child to attempt to learn, and in experience, what is appropriate for a child to grapple with; I would not say being developmentally inappropriate is a great indicator of leaving educators out.

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: 've seen some example reading questions from the common core. They're about the same as when I was in school. "This passage is mostly about a)....."

While I do agree with you, I would assume you have not seen enough of the sample questions. The Part B questions/answers are painful to read and nowhere near the connective questions I recall. There are some of those in, but are often Part A questions. Then students are presented a wall of details to justify why, but the details make no sense or minor sense, and, as you note, several might be. If I ask my students what a passage is primarily about, 95% will understand. If I ask my students why, 95% will provide a firm rationale and draw details and make inferences and use prior knowledge. If I ask my students to check one of the provided answers, thinking heads out the window.
 
2014-03-02 07:03:01 PM  
Yeah bill gates hates children

Derp

Actual education is a conspiracy!!!!!
 
2014-03-02 07:03:11 PM  

hardinparamedic: and less to teachers unions


To note, not part of a union myself, and I feel none of those in my district nor state or any national one represents my interests enough to join, but teachers unions are not the problem with educational reforms. What teachers unions often argue for is stability in contracts and protection for teachers. Rather, the lack of teachers unions being involved in educational reforms is one of my gripes with them.
 
2014-03-02 07:03:33 PM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: Vangor: The assessment questions I have seen were not simple memorization either but these were not drawing meaning or showing evidence but rather convoluted questions, especially Part B for the reading questions. Nothing about them is critical thinking because critical thinking is not possible with convergent answers.

I've seen some example reading questions from the common core. They're about the same as when I was in school. "This passage is mostly about a)....."

These do nothing to improve student's critical thinking. For starters, there is usually more than one answer that could be convincingly argued, but, more importantly, they fail to give the children the space to argue. The children have to select from a list - they don't get to decide for themselves what the passage is about and then argue their position using the passage for support. Nothing about it is critical thinking.


thatsthejoke.jpg

Seriously, critical thinking is for socialists.  Education is for socialization of students in support the corporate agenda, not to challenge it.
 
2014-03-02 07:05:35 PM  

Vangor: To note, not part of a union myself, and I feel none of those in my district nor state or any national one represents my interests enough to join, but teachers unions are not the problem with educational reforms. What teachers unions often argue for is stability in contracts and protection for teachers. Rather, the lack of teachers unions being involved in educational reforms is one of my gripes with them.


Sorry. I should have left out the unions in that one. I get to thinking too much about Police Unions protecting incompetent assholes.

But yeah. The only teachers that should be steering a common curriculum are those who are credentialed experts in their fields. Not Misses Waddington from Memphis, TN Elementary school.
 
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