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(Sun News Network)   Lamb-flavored beer. Your argument is invalid   (sunnewsnetwork.ca) divider line 37
    More: Cool, beer brewing, Welsh Holidays, dark beer  
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1469 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Mar 2014 at 5:36 PM (26 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



37 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-03-01 04:21:48 PM
Will it come with a plug of wool floating around in the bottle, since our objective here is apparently to ruin a beer by making it taste f*cking gross?
 
2014-03-01 05:03:46 PM
Lamb piss.
 
2014-03-01 05:19:08 PM
NOPEFROMSPACE.GIF
 
2014-03-01 05:32:33 PM
Sounds like the perfect beverage for when I'm dining on H'amb.
 
2014-03-01 05:38:52 PM
Will it taste better with a shot of tzatziki?
 
2014-03-01 05:39:59 PM
Lamb? Ick.
 
2014-03-01 05:41:46 PM
You kids have never had Bell's Hopslamb before?  Not surprising. . .
 
2014-03-01 05:44:14 PM
1.bp.blogspot.com

Baa-a-ad beer.
 
2014-03-01 05:44:52 PM
www.joblo.com
 
2014-03-01 05:45:42 PM
Does it come with packets of mint jelly?
/hork*
 
2014-03-01 05:46:53 PM
Has science gone too far?
 
2014-03-01 05:47:04 PM
I love beer. I love lamb. I love drinking beer while eating lamb. I have exactly no interest in drinking lamb.
 
2014-03-01 05:47:45 PM
So Welsh guys can wake up smelling even more like last night's date!
 
2014-03-01 05:48:26 PM
Thanks Obaaaaaaaaaaama
 
2014-03-01 05:53:52 PM
Next up: ass-flavored beer.

Nice.
 
2014-03-01 05:54:39 PM
Sounds not delicious.
 
2014-03-01 05:56:41 PM
once upon a time there was a beer that was made by putting a whole rooster in the boil.

the rooster was cooked in the wort, it took on some malty sweetness, and it was eaten, the wort would be allowed to go ahead and turn into beer.

did boiling a whole rooster in the wort add anything to the end product? who knows?. the point was to conserve cooking fuel on the farm. Beer had to be made, and that asshole rooster had to die.


but, over all.. cooking meat in the boil of a batch of beer is not an unheard of thing in the history of beer.

As it is, right now, at the brewery I work for we have an Oyster stout tap... you have a base of dry irish stout, and in the boil we added two bushels of raw, live oysters, they were in stainless steel cages, and the cooked in the wort boil for about 20 minutes.  they opened up, released thier oyster juices into everything, Calcium was leached from the shells and muted the acid of the beer itself..

I'm not trying to toot my own horn here or spam the thread.. but this oyster stout is fan-farking-tastic! smooth, creamy, sweet, giant thick head on it. you only get a hint of seafood and brine at the tail end of the glass.
 
2014-03-01 06:09:26 PM

Cerebral Knievel: once upon a time there was a beer that was made by putting a whole rooster in the boil.

the rooster was cooked in the wort, it took on some malty sweetness, and it was eaten, the wort would be allowed to go ahead and turn into beer.

did boiling a whole rooster in the wort add anything to the end product? who knows?. the point was to conserve cooking fuel on the farm. Beer had to be made, and that asshole rooster had to die.


but, over all.. cooking meat in the boil of a batch of beer is not an unheard of thing in the history of beer.

As it is, right now, at the brewery I work for we have an Oyster stout tap... you have a base of dry irish stout, and in the boil we added two bushels of raw, live oysters, they were in stainless steel cages, and the cooked in the wort boil for about 20 minutes.  they opened up, released thier oyster juices into everything, Calcium was leached from the shells and muted the acid of the beer itself..

I'm not trying to toot my own horn here or spam the thread.. but this oyster stout is fan-farking-tastic! smooth, creamy, sweet, giant thick head on it. you only get a hint of seafood and brine at the tail end of the glass.


If you are talking about flying dogs pearl necklace then yes I agree it is fantastic.

If you are talking about another oyster beer then please tell me the name of it so I can try some.
 
2014-03-01 06:14:49 PM

Whatchoo Talkinbout: Next up: ass-flavored beer.

Nice.


It's already here and called Keystone Light.
 
2014-03-01 06:21:15 PM
No, someone asked for a lambic beer, not a lambit beer.

beerlens.com
 
2014-03-01 06:27:46 PM

CipollinaFan: Cerebral Knievel: once upon a time there was a beer that was made by putting a whole rooster in the boil.

the rooster was cooked in the wort, it took on some malty sweetness, and it was eaten, the wort would be allowed to go ahead and turn into beer.

did boiling a whole rooster in the wort add anything to the end product? who knows?. the point was to conserve cooking fuel on the farm. Beer had to be made, and that asshole rooster had to die.


but, over all.. cooking meat in the boil of a batch of beer is not an unheard of thing in the history of beer.

As it is, right now, at the brewery I work for we have an Oyster stout tap... you have a base of dry irish stout, and in the boil we added two bushels of raw, live oysters, they were in stainless steel cages, and the cooked in the wort boil for about 20 minutes.  they opened up, released thier oyster juices into everything, Calcium was leached from the shells and muted the acid of the beer itself..

I'm not trying to toot my own horn here or spam the thread.. but this oyster stout is fan-farking-tastic! smooth, creamy, sweet, giant thick head on it. you only get a hint of seafood and brine at the tail end of the glass.

If you are talking about flying dogs pearl necklace then yes I agree it is fantastic.

If you are talking about another oyster beer then please tell me the name of it so I can try some.


I work for Legend Brewing Company out of Richmond VA, our oyster stout is part of our "Urban Legend" Series and is called "Teach's Oyster stout"  named for Ed teach, i.e Blackbeard the pirate, who met his fate in Hampton Rhodes VA. I personaly would have named it "black beards ghost" or some such, but, there ya go...

but, we know the folks up at flying dog, and we did ask them some questions about the style..
 
2014-03-01 06:28:39 PM
gross
 
2014-03-01 06:41:41 PM
I think I'd rather have beer-flavored lamb.
 
2014-03-01 06:42:03 PM

Cerebral Knievel: once upon a time there was a beer that was made by putting a whole rooster in the boil.

the rooster was cooked in the wort, it took on some malty sweetness, and it was eaten, the wort would be allowed to go ahead and turn into beer.


I've read a bunch of old "receipts" along those lines. The rooster wasn't eaten. It served as a primitive yeast nutrient.
 
2014-03-01 06:44:18 PM

Cerebral Knievel: CipollinaFan: Cerebral Knievel: once upon a time there was a beer that was made by putting a whole rooster in the boil.

the rooster was cooked in the wort, it took on some malty sweetness, and it was eaten, the wort would be allowed to go ahead and turn into beer.

did boiling a whole rooster in the wort add anything to the end product? who knows?. the point was to conserve cooking fuel on the farm. Beer had to be made, and that asshole rooster had to die.


but, over all.. cooking meat in the boil of a batch of beer is not an unheard of thing in the history of beer.

As it is, right now, at the brewery I work for we have an Oyster stout tap... you have a base of dry irish stout, and in the boil we added two bushels of raw, live oysters, they were in stainless steel cages, and the cooked in the wort boil for about 20 minutes.  they opened up, released thier oyster juices into everything, Calcium was leached from the shells and muted the acid of the beer itself..

I'm not trying to toot my own horn here or spam the thread.. but this oyster stout is fan-farking-tastic! smooth, creamy, sweet, giant thick head on it. you only get a hint of seafood and brine at the tail end of the glass.

If you are talking about flying dogs pearl necklace then yes I agree it is fantastic.

If you are talking about another oyster beer then please tell me the name of it so I can try some.

I work for Legend Brewing Company out of Richmond VA, our oyster stout is part of our "Urban Legend" Series and is called "Teach's Oyster stout"  named for Ed teach, i.e Blackbeard the pirate, who met his fate in Hampton Rhodes VA. I personaly would have named it "black beards ghost" or some such, but, there ya go...

but, we know the folks up at flying dog, and we did ask them some questions about the style..


If I can find it in Maryland I will definitely give it a try.
 
2014-03-01 06:44:23 PM
FTA: "I think this is the first time it's been done, although historically meat (offal) and shellfish were used in beer to add nutritional value," he said.

So, you think you're the first to do something that you know has been done historically for a long time?

WTF? I don't even...
 
2014-03-01 06:47:10 PM

anuran: Cerebral Knievel: once upon a time there was a beer that was made by putting a whole rooster in the boil.

the rooster was cooked in the wort, it took on some malty sweetness, and it was eaten, the wort would be allowed to go ahead and turn into beer.

I've read a bunch of old "receipts" along those lines. The rooster wasn't eaten. It served as a primitive yeast nutrient.


Why would you not eat it? why would you waste that meat, that protein? and if you are using the word "receipts" why would you assume the farm house brewer of such a time would know what the yeast was, let alone it needed nutrients?
 
2014-03-01 06:53:56 PM

CipollinaFan: Cerebral Knievel: CipollinaFan: Cerebral Knievel: once upon a time there was a beer that was made by putting a whole rooster in the boil.

the rooster was cooked in the wort, it took on some malty sweetness, and it was eaten, the wort would be allowed to go ahead and turn into beer.

did boiling a whole rooster in the wort add anything to the end product? who knows?. the point was to conserve cooking fuel on the farm. Beer had to be made, and that asshole rooster had to die.


but, over all.. cooking meat in the boil of a batch of beer is not an unheard of thing in the history of beer.

As it is, right now, at the brewery I work for we have an Oyster stout tap... you have a base of dry irish stout, and in the boil we added two bushels of raw, live oysters, they were in stainless steel cages, and the cooked in the wort boil for about 20 minutes.  they opened up, released thier oyster juices into everything, Calcium was leached from the shells and muted the acid of the beer itself..

I'm not trying to toot my own horn here or spam the thread.. but this oyster stout is fan-farking-tastic! smooth, creamy, sweet, giant thick head on it. you only get a hint of seafood and brine at the tail end of the glass.

If you are talking about flying dogs pearl necklace then yes I agree it is fantastic.

If you are talking about another oyster beer then please tell me the name of it so I can try some.

I work for Legend Brewing Company out of Richmond VA, our oyster stout is part of our "Urban Legend" Series and is called "Teach's Oyster stout"  named for Ed teach, i.e Blackbeard the pirate, who met his fate in Hampton Rhodes VA. I personaly would have named it "black beards ghost" or some such, but, there ya go...

but, we know the folks up at flying dog, and we did ask them some questions about the style..

If I can find it in Maryland I will definitely give it a try.


We sell in NorVa and DC,  We were in Baltimore and Baltimore county but MD has fun and interesting ABC laws and is a PITA to deal with. we can sell in MD but don't usually.
Speak Easy distributers in DC is our current northern most distributor, so if you can hook up with them? they should be able to stear you in the right direction.
 
2014-03-01 07:12:24 PM

Cerebral Knievel: once upon a time there was a beer that was made by putting a whole rooster in the boil.

the rooster was cooked in the wort, it took on some malty sweetness, and it was eaten, the wort would be allowed to go ahead and turn into beer.

did boiling a whole rooster in the wort add anything to the end product? who knows?. the point was to conserve cooking fuel on the farm. Beer had to be made, and that asshole rooster had to die.


but, over all.. cooking meat in the boil of a batch of beer is not an unheard of thing in the history of beer.

As it is, right now, at the brewery I work for we have an Oyster stout tap... you have a base of dry irish stout, and in the boil we added two bushels of raw, live oysters, they were in stainless steel cages, and the cooked in the wort boil for about 20 minutes.  they opened up, released thier oyster juices into everything, Calcium was leached from the shells and muted the acid of the beer itself..

I'm not trying to toot my own horn here or spam the thread.. but this oyster stout is fan-farking-tastic! smooth, creamy, sweet, giant thick head on it. you only get a hint of seafood and brine at the tail end of the glass.


As far I as I understand it, oyster stout was supposed to be stout you had with oysters, but due to some variation of chinese whispers, crazy people started using actual oysters in the beer.
 
2014-03-01 07:16:35 PM
Mary had a lamb flavored beer
It's foam was white as snow
And everywhere that Mary went
The vomit was sure to flow
 
2014-03-01 07:35:41 PM
I've had some.  It's not baaaaaaaad.


/no one else?
 
2014-03-01 08:06:07 PM

Gothnet: Cerebral Knievel: once upon a time there was a beer that was made by putting a whole rooster in the boil.

the rooster was cooked in the wort, it took on some malty sweetness, and it was eaten, the wort would be allowed to go ahead and turn into beer.

did boiling a whole rooster in the wort add anything to the end product? who knows?. the point was to conserve cooking fuel on the farm. Beer had to be made, and that asshole rooster had to die.


but, over all.. cooking meat in the boil of a batch of beer is not an unheard of thing in the history of beer.

As it is, right now, at the brewery I work for we have an Oyster stout tap... you have a base of dry irish stout, and in the boil we added two bushels of raw, live oysters, they were in stainless steel cages, and the cooked in the wort boil for about 20 minutes.  they opened up, released thier oyster juices into everything, Calcium was leached from the shells and muted the acid of the beer itself..

I'm not trying to toot my own horn here or spam the thread.. but this oyster stout is fan-farking-tastic! smooth, creamy, sweet, giant thick head on it. you only get a hint of seafood and brine at the tail end of the glass.

As far I as I understand it, oyster stout was supposed to be stout you had with oysters, but due to some variation of chinese whispers, crazy people started using actual oysters in the beer.


I would more support the notion that folks were boiling something anyways and just tossed the oysters in.. ala Rock soup ;)

after a while, folks noticed that they just liked it that way and then made up reasons to justify the wierdness ;)

y'know, like God and Texans?
 
2014-03-01 11:11:44 PM
I was pondering the state of the world just yesterday, and I came to the conclusion that this would be a much better place if only we had a beer that tasted more like soap and moldy wool blankets, so yeah, this will be perfect for that. They should probably throw some cilantro in at the same time just to push it into the realm of the truly toxic.
 
2014-03-02 01:45:37 AM
Is it a smoked porter? Meat can work in beer if it is a Rauchbier.
 
2014-03-02 01:49:35 AM
1.media.dorkly.cvcdn.com

If the meat beer's too much for you maybe you'd like a big glass of milk?
 
2014-03-02 08:32:09 AM
that sounds disgusting
 
2014-03-02 07:11:01 PM

TofuTheAlmighty: I love beer. I love lamb. I love drinking beer while eating lamb. I have exactly no interest in drinking lamb.


Came here to say this.

/Roast lamb for dinner tonight, with Little Creatures pale ale on the side. Mmmmmm.
 
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