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(Guardian)   You are all biased as hell, unlike subby   (theguardian.com ) divider line
    More: Obvious, cognitive biases  
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2007 clicks; posted to Geek » on 01 Mar 2014 at 1:42 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



18 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2014-03-01 02:41:57 PM  
Yes, but some of us are biased towards awesome.
 
2014-03-01 02:59:58 PM  
I tried being radial for a few years but it made me look soft.
 
2014-03-01 03:05:26 PM  
Of course I'm biased. But I know I'm biased, and I know when to shut the hell up.
 
2014-03-01 03:14:38 PM  
I think for myself. At least, that's what I think. But then, I'm biased.
 
2014-03-01 03:28:42 PM  
A Guardian CommentIsFree thread about bias and groupthink....
At last! A subject they're qualified to discuss!
 
2014-03-01 03:40:47 PM  
What if you're biased against bias?
 
2014-03-01 03:46:27 PM  
I think I'm more halfased
 
2014-03-01 04:04:56 PM  

wildcardjack: Of course I'm biased. But I know I'm biased, and I know when to shut the hell up.


That would have been at "Of course I'm biased".
 
2014-03-01 04:17:57 PM  
I think splunge
 
2014-03-01 06:46:55 PM  
I am biased as all hell.  And to make it worse I know I'm biased as all hell.  And I don't care.

/subby
 
2014-03-01 07:01:51 PM  
Does anyone think this is new information? That's why they have double blind studies.
 
2014-03-01 08:16:21 PM  
Biased?  Me?   Hell no!    :)
 
2014-03-01 10:17:17 PM  
The study is not about bias, necessarily.  Or maybe it's that the way the author really wrecks it, like so many science articles on the net.

It is a study on people wanting to seem informed.  You see it in people with some types of memory loss, they'll feign recognition to cover, to fit in.

You see it in children that will lie because they think it's the answer that you want to hear.

It's not objective, but it's not subjective either. It bypasses analyzation completely by faking it.

It's not even about if they like it the painting, be it from an artist or a fingerpainting from a child. It's about social status, more indicative of utter neutrality or disinterest to the painting itself.

It is complete lack of opinion, an utter bypass of thinking about it at all, not having an opinion influenced by whether or not it's appealing or seemingly skillfully made.

I move that it's not merely the article writer not quite grasping the subject at hand, but also the supposed experts.

There's objectivity, bias, as well as fabricated opinion where there is not any actual opinion present.

The distinction is important.  These people that fall for the "brand name" of something tend to be fickle, are influenced by various other things that even people of bias may not fall prey to.

People of bias tend to operate a lot on faith and conviction.  These sorts of people that the study singles out are more of the type to not have any sort of faith or conviction if they do not have an express interest in the topic being quizzed about.

In a possibly more understandable example:

There's atheist, based on logic.  There's religious based on conviction.  And there's hipster, which is more of an imitator, and can self represent as either of the previous two categories, whichever will bring it the better social status or personal comfort.

Some devoutly religious people may be delusional(and are thus bias), as where some poser hipsters may be psychopaths/antisocials/utterly devoid of emotion or a sense of right/wrong/etc (and thus have no bias).

If you don't actually have an opinion, you cannot have bias.
 
2014-03-02 04:53:41 AM  

omeganuepsilon: It's not objective, but it's not subjective either. It bypasses analyzation completely by faking it.

It's not even about if they like it the painting, be it from an artist or a fingerpainting from a child. It's about social status, more indicative of utter neutrality or disinterest to the painting itself.


I've said for sometime that the key thing with artists like Jeff Koons and Damien Hirst is that what keeps the prices high is that people want to look smart and informed. It's really emperor's new clothes and the minute that people recognise it will be the minute that this stuff becomes utterly worthless.
 
2014-03-02 06:13:49 AM  
I watched a program about exactly this recently and got all the questions `wrong`

for example, which has more words,

words that start with `r` or words with `r` as the third letter.

I thought the latter. It seems I should have thought the former to be more biased (but wrong). This happened again and again with the examples designed to show your bias. I`d rather give someone £5 than take a 50/50 bet and risk losing £10. I`d rather take £5 than risk it on a 50/50 bet to double it too. No benefit in the odds, reduce possible losses. Just makes sense.

These are all wrong answers it seems.
 
2014-03-02 06:15:09 AM  
The price of an object is what someone is willing to pay for it.

That`s it. Sometimes it`s high because it has been high in the past and people are willing to pay on the basis of only that.
 
2014-03-02 09:32:45 AM  

farkeruk: omeganuepsilon: It's not objective, but it's not subjective either. It bypasses analyzation completely by faking it.

It's not even about if they like it the painting, be it from an artist or a fingerpainting from a child. It's about social status, more indicative of utter neutrality or disinterest to the painting itself.

I've said for sometime that the key thing with artists like Jeff Koons and Damien Hirst is that what keeps the prices high is that people want to look smart and informed. It's really emperor's new clothes and the minute that people recognise it will be the minute that this stuff becomes utterly worthless.


No idea who they are at all, but the rest of your post is spot on.  There's actual art, fairly subjective still, and then there is art culture that dwells too much on status.

dready zim: I watched a program about exactly this recently and got all the questions `wrong`

for example, which has more words,

words that start with `r` or words with `r` as the third letter.

I thought the latter. It seems I should have thought the former to be more biased (but wrong). This happened again and again with the examples designed to show your bias. I`d rather give someone £5 than take a 50/50 bet and risk losing £10. I`d rather take £5 than risk it on a 50/50 bet to double it too. No benefit in the odds, reduce possible losses. Just makes sense.

These are all wrong answers it seems.


That sample isn't exactly the bias the article discusses, but you do strike on something.  Right and wrong answers.
sometimes there are no right answers.

If I ask you how long my dick is, you'll be forced to guess or say "I don't know".  People, by and large, have an issue saying the second option, unless their image is strengthened by it.  A lot of people would be rather proud to not know how long my dick is(just as an example again of something people would not want to know), but that's an aside I guess.

My point was that it's still a guess, even if it is correct.  You got to it through no objective means, pure luck.  Right or wrong is irrelevant at that point, the people who were correct are still 100% ignorant on the topic.  Without confirmation, they are in no better position to convince others than the people that were wrong.

A lot of studies don't leave room for "I don't know", and certainly not for "I don't care."  They seek to withdraw information towards a specific direction, and end up affecting their own study with confirmation bias, in this case through ignorance, but that ignorance is very often willful or utter incapability.

Of course, that's what happens when you require papers and thesis'es from everyone without exception, for career advancement.
 
2014-03-02 03:05:05 PM  

omeganuepsilon: farkeruk: omeganuepsilon: It's not objective, but it's not subjective either. It bypasses analyzation completely by faking it.

It's not even about if they like it the painting, be it from an artist or a fingerpainting from a child. It's about social status, more indicative of utter neutrality or disinterest to the painting itself.

I've said for sometime that the key thing with artists like Jeff Koons and Damien Hirst is that what keeps the prices high is that people want to look smart and informed. It's really emperor's new clothes and the minute that people recognise it will be the minute that this stuff becomes utterly worthless.

No idea who they are at all, but the rest of your post is spot on.  There's actual art, fairly subjective still, and then there is art culture that dwells too much on status.

dready zim: I watched a program about exactly this recently and got all the questions `wrong`

for example, which has more words,

words that start with `r` or words with `r` as the third letter.

I thought the latter. It seems I should have thought the former to be more biased (but wrong). This happened again and again with the examples designed to show your bias. I`d rather give someone £5 than take a 50/50 bet and risk losing £10. I`d rather take £5 than risk it on a 50/50 bet to double it too. No benefit in the odds, reduce possible losses. Just makes sense.

These are all wrong answers it seems.

That sample isn't exactly the bias the article discusses, but you do strike on something.  Right and wrong answers.
sometimes there are no right answers.

If I ask you how long my dick is, you'll be forced to guess or say "I don't know".  People, by and large, have an issue saying the second option, unless their image is strengthened by it.  A lot of people would be rather proud to not know how long my dick is(just as an example again of something people would not want to know), but that's an aside I guess.

My point was that it's still a guess, even if it is correc ...


What I meant by a wrong answer was I failed to show the bias they were hoping to show.
 
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