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(Boston.com)   American Airlines is getting rid of discounted bereavement fares. Your loss is their gain   (boston.com) divider line 26
    More: Stupid, American Airlines, Americans, bereavement fare, domestic flights, menu, airlines  
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867 clicks; posted to Business » on 27 Feb 2014 at 12:57 PM (39 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



26 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-02-27 01:05:06 PM  
storage.canoe.ca

Does not approve.
 
2014-02-27 01:08:28 PM  
First thing that came to mind:

Any GTA5 players here?
 
2014-02-27 01:11:46 PM  
Any different then Delta redoing their Frequent Flier Program where it goes by dollars you spend and not the distance you fly?
 
2014-02-27 01:14:58 PM  
Is that wrong? Should they not be doing that? I gotta plead ignorance here.
 
2014-02-27 01:22:31 PM  
I'm not normally one to do this...but

+1 subby
 
2014-02-27 01:42:54 PM  
This is probably a good thing for the bereaved because if they are flying AA, they are probably going to miss the funeral.
 
2014-02-27 01:50:14 PM  
Nice.  Well, not the part where your family member died.  The headline.
 
2014-02-27 02:15:57 PM  
The move brings American in line with the policy at merger partner US Airways, which does not offer bereavement fares.

So, yet another way that lowering competition has made it worse for the consumer. Can the DOJ take backsies on the merger still?
 
2014-02-27 02:26:55 PM  

Mad_Radhu: [storage.canoe.ca image 248x186]

Does not approve.


Done in one.
 
2014-02-27 02:38:17 PM  
What assholes
 
2014-02-27 03:01:16 PM  

Gig103: The move brings American in line with the policy at merger partner US Airways, which does not offer bereavement fares.

So, yet another way that lowering competition has made it worse for the consumer. Can the DOJ take backsies on the merger still?


They're retaining American Airlines' brand name. US Airways should conform to THEIR policy. So naturally it isn't.
 
2014-02-27 03:09:36 PM  
I was shocked they offered them at all......
 
2014-02-27 03:45:07 PM  

eagles95: Any different then Delta redoing their Frequent Flier Program where it goes by dollars you spend and not the distance you fly?


Not at all related.
 
2014-02-27 03:51:57 PM  
And the bottom drops out of the douche-bag.

The normal pricing schedule for airlines is by itself nonsensical and made-up.  It does not in fact cost more to fly a person's ass from point A to point B whether they booked the ticket in advance or not.

While there may be reasons to incentivize early bookings (to add additional flights if needed) that relies on two notions: 1) advance knowledge of travel; and 2) choice.

A person whose parent dies in Idaho next week has neither of these things.  Everyone else trying to get that last minute ticket has one or the other or both.  The "supply and demand" economics argument applies to them. It does NOT apply to the bereaved traveler, which is why it made sense to have a discounted rate for them.
 
2014-02-27 04:44:10 PM  

cefm: And the bottom drops out of the douche-bag.

The normal pricing schedule for airlines is by itself nonsensical and made-up.  It does not in fact cost more to fly a person's ass from point A to point B whether they booked the ticket in advance or not.

While there may be reasons to incentivize early bookings (to add additional flights if needed) that relies on two notions: 1) advance knowledge of travel; and 2) choice.

A person whose parent dies in Idaho next week has neither of these things.  Everyone else trying to get that last minute ticket has one or the other or both.  The "supply and demand" economics argument applies to them. It does NOT apply to the bereaved traveler, which is why it made sense to have a discounted rate for them.


Is there some sort of proof of bereavement that you have to offer? Otherwise wouldn't this be, like, the easiest thing in the world to take advantage of? Just show up at the counter wearing all black and have some Visine running down your face. Bam, discount!

The only time I ever flew to a funeral, I used free Southwest vouchers, so this potential discount wouldn't have mattered anyway.
 
2014-02-27 04:47:23 PM  
Silly me: I thought flying AA CAUSED bereavement
 
2014-02-27 04:55:29 PM  

the cake is a pie: cefm: And the bottom drops out of the douche-bag.

The normal pricing schedule for airlines is by itself nonsensical and made-up.  It does not in fact cost more to fly a person's ass from point A to point B whether they booked the ticket in advance or not.

While there may be reasons to incentivize early bookings (to add additional flights if needed) that relies on two notions: 1) advance knowledge of travel; and 2) choice.

A person whose parent dies in Idaho next week has neither of these things.  Everyone else trying to get that last minute ticket has one or the other or both.  The "supply and demand" economics argument applies to them. It does NOT apply to the bereaved traveler, which is why it made sense to have a discounted rate for them.

Is there some sort of proof of bereavement that you have to offer? Otherwise wouldn't this be, like, the easiest thing in the world to take advantage of? Just show up at the counter wearing all black and have some Visine running down your face. Bam, discount!

The only time I ever flew to a funeral, I used free Southwest vouchers, so this potential discount wouldn't have mattered anyway.


The one time I used a bereavement fare, many years ago, the airline said they wanted a copy of the death certificate when I checked in for the return flight.

I know I got a copy of the death certificate, but I don't remember if the clerk at the counter even asked for it.

/Last time I flew for a funeral on short notice, I used Continental United Breaks Guitars frequent flyer miles.
 
2014-02-27 05:47:10 PM  

Unauthorized Bratwurst: The one time I used a bereavement fare, many years ago, the airline said they wanted a copy of the death certificate when I checked in for the return flight.


As someone who luckily has not lost anyone far away, I don't know the whole process... but can you actually get a death certificate on such short notice?  I'd kinda assume once the person has passed, there's still a bunch of red tape to get the certificate completed.
 
2014-02-27 06:21:08 PM  

the cake is a pie: cefm: And the bottom drops out of the douche-bag.

The normal pricing schedule for airlines is by itself nonsensical and made-up.  It does not in fact cost more to fly a person's ass from point A to point B whether they booked the ticket in advance or not.

While there may be reasons to incentivize early bookings (to add additional flights if needed) that relies on two notions: 1) advance knowledge of travel; and 2) choice.

A person whose parent dies in Idaho next week has neither of these things.  Everyone else trying to get that last minute ticket has one or the other or both.  The "supply and demand" economics argument applies to them. It does NOT apply to the bereaved traveler, which is why it made sense to have a discounted rate for them.

Is there some sort of proof of bereavement that you have to offer? Otherwise wouldn't this be, like, the easiest thing in the world to take advantage of? Just show up at the counter wearing all black and have some Visine running down your face. Bam, discount!

The only time I ever flew to a funeral, I used free Southwest vouchers, so this potential discount wouldn't have mattered anyway.


When my dad passed away a few years ago, I flew home on American Airlines. They asked for the name and phone number of the funeral home, and got the confirmation from them. Being a grad student living halfway across the country, if it weren't for the discount I got, I probably wouldn't have been able to afford to go.
 
2014-02-27 06:23:04 PM  

Unauthorized Bratwurst: the cake is a pie: cefm: And the bottom drops out of the douche-bag.

The normal pricing schedule for airlines is by itself nonsensical and made-up.  It does not in fact cost more to fly a person's ass from point A to point B whether they booked the ticket in advance or not.

While there may be reasons to incentivize early bookings (to add additional flights if needed) that relies on two notions: 1) advance knowledge of travel; and 2) choice.

A person whose parent dies in Idaho next week has neither of these things.  Everyone else trying to get that last minute ticket has one or the other or both.  The "supply and demand" economics argument applies to them. It does NOT apply to the bereaved traveler, which is why it made sense to have a discounted rate for them.

Is there some sort of proof of bereavement that you have to offer? Otherwise wouldn't this be, like, the easiest thing in the world to take advantage of? Just show up at the counter wearing all black and have some Visine running down your face. Bam, discount!

The only time I ever flew to a funeral, I used free Southwest vouchers, so this potential discount wouldn't have mattered anyway.

The one time I used a bereavement fare, many years ago, the airline said they wanted a copy of the death certificate when I checked in for the return flight.

I know I got a copy of the death certificate, but I don't remember if the clerk at the counter even asked for it.

/Last time I flew for a funeral on short notice, I used Continental United Breaks Guitars frequent flyer miles.


I flew bereavement once. I wasn't asked to prove anything, which was good, because I was full of shiat.
 
2014-02-27 06:25:35 PM  

DonQuixote314159: Being a grad student living halfway across the country, if it weren't for the discount I got, I probably wouldn't have been able to afford to go


Wow, you must have been studying something pretty interesting.
 
2014-02-27 06:41:17 PM  
From another article: "We remain committed to doing all we can to relieve the burden of travel for our customers in times of need. With the advent of more choices, lower cost carriers and larger networks, the industry has started to move away from bereavement fares because walk-up fares are generally lower than in the past, and customers now have more opportunities to find affordable fares at the last minute," American spokesman Matt Miller said in a statement."

I can't believe he can say that with a straight face. We used to have 8-10 major airlines, now we have 3, plus the "low cost" carriers which are no longer anything of the sort. If my mother was ill and I had to fly to Charleston tomorrow, Southwest wants $1,000+ R/T.
 
2014-02-27 06:57:19 PM  

ImpendingCynic: If my mother was ill and I had to fly to Charleston tomorrow, Southwest wants $1,000+ R/T.


From where? That's usually what I pay to go from Israel to my midwest town...
 
2014-02-27 06:57:54 PM  

downstairs: Unauthorized Bratwurst: The one time I used a bereavement fare, many years ago, the airline said they wanted a copy of the death certificate when I checked in for the return flight.

As someone who luckily has not lost anyone far away, I don't know the whole process... but can you actually get a death certificate on such short notice?  I'd kinda assume once the person has passed, there's still a bunch of red tape to get the certificate completed.


I'm very far from being an expert on the subject, but my experience has been that the death certificates were available at the time of the funeral, and that the funeral home could provide you with copies. (I don't think the airline required certified copies, so a Xerox would be okay.)

I have it in my head that the death certificate has to be completed before the body is released to the funeral home. I don't think it is that complicated a process, depending. For example, all of my relatives who passed were under a doctor's care at the time of their deaths, so no autopsy was required, and I think the doctor in charge was just able to sign the certificate.
 
2014-02-27 07:50:25 PM  

proteus_b: ImpendingCynic: If my mother was ill and I had to fly to Charleston tomorrow, Southwest wants $1,000+ R/T.

From where? That's usually what I pay to go from Israel to my midwest town...


To fly Pittsburg to St. Louis on 2 days notice last march, Southwest wanted $1200.

I drove.
 
2014-02-27 09:41:05 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Silly me: I thought flying AA CAUSED bereavement


Should have introduced this new policy after 9/11.
 
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