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(Popular Science)   Structural engineers around the world tout the most advanced building material that is taking the construction industry by storm and will utterly remake city skylines ... wood   (popsci.com) divider line 20
    More: Strange, structural engineers, skylines, Shoreditch, waste minimisation, Luftwaffe, tallest skyscraper, storms, Burj Khalifa  
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7974 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Feb 2014 at 10:19 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Funniest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2014-02-27 11:11:43 AM  
4 votes:
The logs in my fireplace char up on the outside, protecting the wood inside.
2014-02-27 10:22:33 AM  
4 votes:
Got WOOD?!?!?

keekles.org
2014-02-27 10:57:17 AM  
3 votes:

Buggar: brimed03: The Irresponsible Captain: Interesting. Personally, I'm hoping that laminate beams will revive timber frame construction. The solid wood panels have some advantages that were missed. They insulate better than steel and wood, they flex more than concrete without breaking.

Without knowing what I'm looking for, all I could find for sure on Google was laminated beams.  Could you provide a relevant link?  I'm interested.

You poor thing, you can't find CLT?  Just do a GIS for CLT and you'll see a few diagrams and pictures that will help you more easily recognize it in the future.


That the problem.....even with a diagram most guys can't find the CLT..
2014-02-27 11:03:33 AM  
2 votes:
www.popsci.com

ad009cdnb.archdaily.net
2014-02-27 10:45:43 AM  
2 votes:

cgraves67: Fun Fact: Tokyo was once built of wood. I wonder what happened to it?
[upload.wikimedia.org image 250x233]


static.lolyard.com

Hint: It ain't wood.
2014-02-27 10:33:14 AM  
2 votes:
First thing I thought of:

i1.cpcache.com
2014-02-27 12:42:49 PM  
1 votes:
He said wood

img.fark.net
2014-02-27 11:58:07 AM  
1 votes:

brimed03: Buggar: brimed03: Buggar: brimed03: The Irresponsible Captain: Interesting. Personally, I'm hoping that laminate beams will revive timber frame construction. The solid wood panels have some advantages that were missed. They insulate better than steel and wood, they flex more than concrete without breaking.

Without knowing what I'm looking for, all I could find for sure on Google was laminated beams.  Could you provide a relevant link?  I'm interested.

You poor thing, you can't find CLT?  Just do a GIS for CLT and you'll see a few diagrams and pictures that will help you more easily recognize it in the future.

The fun part is knowing that, before posting, you did exactly that just to make sure you didn't sound like some jerk idiot.

/didn't work

Well you were obviously searching for it in the wrong way.  Don't get mad at me cause you're looking in all the wrong places.

I had Google-searched "cross-laminated timber."  Forgive me for not being so bright as to think of using the less-specific abbreviation.


Try looking for cross laminated integrated timber....
2014-02-27 11:24:56 AM  
1 votes:

max_pooper: brimed03: Mose: A thick plank of wood will char on the outside, sealing the wood inside from damage. Metal, on the other hand, begins to melt. "Steel, when it burns, it's like spaghetti," says B.J. Yeh, the technical services director for APA-the Engineered Wood Association.

There's so much stupid in those sentences right there, I don't know where to begin.

I grant the guy's job is to shill for the industry.  But, bearing in mind that most of us don't know you, what credentials and expertise do you have over this guy?


Let's see, who should I listen to, a registered Professional Engineer with PhD from Berkley or a farker with a GED in buildingology?


I'm going to archtitecture me up some sheltering because I'm a buildingologist.  Great now you have me talking like I'm a former President.   Nice strategery. Jerk
2014-02-27 11:18:09 AM  
1 votes:

brimed03: Buggar: ChipNASA: Buggar: brimed03: The Irresponsible Captain: Interesting. Personally, I'm hoping that laminate beams will revive timber frame construction. The solid wood panels have some advantages that were missed. They insulate better than steel and wood, they flex more than concrete without breaking.

Without knowing what I'm looking for, all I could find for sure on Google was laminated beams.  Could you provide a relevant link?  I'm interested.

You poor thing, you can't find CLT?  Just do a GIS for CLT and you'll see a few diagrams and pictures that will help you more easily recognize it in the future.

That the problem.....even with a diagram most guys can't find the CLT..

Truth be told, I've only see it from these pictures on the internet myself.  I've handled plenty of plywood, OSB, and laminated timbers, and while they may be similar, they aren't the same.  I would be surprised if it isn't 16 years before I see CLT in person.

Damn.  Too easy.  You take all the fun out of it.

/The rest of us will be surprised if it only takes you 16 years to see CLT in person


Ok here it goes...

CLT?

EIP.


/I'm going to get so many photos of wood. LMFAO
2014-02-27 11:09:00 AM  
1 votes:

Mose: brimed03: Mose: A thick plank of wood will char on the outside, sealing the wood inside from damage. Metal, on the other hand, begins to melt. "Steel, when it burns, it's like spaghetti," says B.J. Yeh, the technical services director for APA-the Engineered Wood Association.

There's so much stupid in those sentences right there, I don't know where to begin.

I grant the guy's job is to shill for the industry.  But, bearing in mind that most of us don't know you, what credentials and expertise do you have over this guy?

BS mechanical engineering, MS fire protection engineering, 4 years as a full time firefighter, 8 years as a volunteer firefighter, 10 years professional fire protection engineering experience specializing in the performance of fire sprinklers.


Or, you might just happen to know that steel melts at ~2500F and that wood typically burns somewhere before that.  "Searing" is all well and good, but 2500F good?
2014-02-27 11:03:07 AM  
1 votes:

Mose: brimed03: Mose: A thick plank of wood will char on the outside, sealing the wood inside from damage. Metal, on the other hand, begins to melt. "Steel, when it burns, it's like spaghetti," says B.J. Yeh, the technical services director for APA-the Engineered Wood Association.

There's so much stupid in those sentences right there, I don't know where to begin.

I grant the guy's job is to shill for the industry.  But, bearing in mind that most of us don't know you, what credentials and expertise do you have over this guy?

BS mechanical engineering, MS fire protection engineering, 4 years as a full time firefighter, 8 years as a volunteer firefighter, 10 years professional fire protection engineering experience specializing in the performance of fire sprinklers.


show off
2014-02-27 11:01:54 AM  
1 votes:

TheShavingofOccam123: I have a massive edifice of wood. If you get real close and shut one eye.

I can hardly wait until the PRC starts exporting this to us. Delamination at 30 stories.


What is best in life?

To crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and to hear the delamination of their cities.
2014-02-27 10:56:59 AM  
1 votes:

Mose: A thick plank of wood will char on the outside, sealing the wood inside from damage. Metal, on the other hand, begins to melt. "Steel, when it burns, it's like spaghetti," says B.J. Yeh, the technical services director for APA-the Engineered Wood Association.

There's so much stupid in those sentences right there, I don't know where to begin.


But he's got a cool name.

What's your name?
BJ
BJ?
Yeh
2014-02-27 10:39:47 AM  
1 votes:
isn't this how Noah managed to build a 500 foot long ark?  That's what Ken Ham told me during the debate.
2014-02-27 10:39:21 AM  
1 votes:
Best thing about it is it weighs the same as a duck.
content6.flixster.com
/and it can be made earthquake-proof by employing sheep's bladders
2014-02-27 10:37:44 AM  
1 votes:

Smeggy Smurf: Buggar: CLT is real. Once you learn how to use it properly a whole new world opens up.  But you can't just grab it and go banging and nailing willy nilly.  You gotta plan, evaluate the terrain, inspect the ground up close and build a proper foundation before you go laying the CLT down.

The only thing that will make CLT popular is if steel prices skyrocket

poplar is Salicaceae. 

Fixed that for yew.
2014-02-27 10:32:09 AM  
1 votes:
CLT is real. Once you learn how to use it properly a whole new world opens up.  But you can't just grab it and go banging and nailing willy nilly.  You gotta plan, evaluate the terrain, inspect the ground up close and build a proper foundation before you go laying the CLT down.
2014-02-27 10:29:54 AM  
1 votes:
Well, if you say so.
timeentertainment.files.wordpress.com
2014-02-27 10:28:45 AM  
1 votes:
A thick plank of wood will char on the outside, sealing the wood inside from damage. Metal, on the other hand, begins to melt. "Steel, when it burns, it's like spaghetti," says B.J. Yeh, the technical services director for APA-the Engineered Wood Association.

There's so much stupid in those sentences right there, I don't know where to begin.
 
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