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(Sky.com)   Teacher comes up with stunning idea: instead of just labeling kids dyslexic and putting them in the slow-learners class, why not just teach them to read?   (news.sky.com) divider line 77
    More: Unlikely, Durham University, teachers  
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4970 clicks; posted to Main » on 26 Feb 2014 at 1:07 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-02-26 12:38:21 PM  
thepoliticalcarnival.net
 
2014-02-26 01:11:11 PM  
Tell alcoholics to stop drinking and drug addicts to stop using, fatties to stop eating and sad people to "cheer up!"


/my GOD! I can solve all the world's problems like that.
 
2014-02-26 01:11:43 PM  
Like coont monkey asf edweg?
 
2014-02-26 01:13:29 PM  
Well if they do that then their less than stellar test scores will bring down the average.


We can't have that
 
2014-02-26 01:13:41 PM  
They learn to read in the slow learners class.

Slowly.

And with frequent interruptions to deal with the real psychos.

Best shot is to get a tutor, adapt, overcome, and get mainstreamed ASAP. Because you'll just get further and further behind every year otherwise.

Crapping your pants to annoy your teacher when you're in 8th grade isn't normal, but in Special Ed it is.
 
2014-02-26 01:13:59 PM  
Teach brain dead people to get better
 
2014-02-26 01:14:38 PM  
They try this now?????
 
2014-02-26 01:16:23 PM  
Exactly! And those blind kids who are too lazy to see? Teach them personal responsibility! And don't get me started on those so-called "hearing impaired" people. I hear just fine, they just want special rights.
 
2014-02-26 01:16:36 PM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: Well if they do that then their less than stellar test scores will bring down the average.


We can't have that


That's the thing about dyslexia. At least with milder cases, you can compensate for it pretty thoroughly - no drop in test scores.

But that's if you get help, good help, and early help. If you're just that random kid in the "slow" class and disappear into the background... well, like Nancy Reagan said. "A mind is a terribly thing to waste."
 
2014-02-26 01:17:05 PM  
Dyslexia does exist, but it is rather rare. Lazy kids who refuse to read and get behind get the label, just as disruptive little brats get the label ADHD.
 
2014-02-26 01:17:16 PM  
www.principiadialectica.co.uk

The idea is sound, except that the schools are too small.
 
2014-02-26 01:17:43 PM  
Why do people have such a problem with "labeling" someone with dyslexia?  Would they rather the kid be labeled "that idiot kid who's too stupid to learn how to read?"

/they're always going to call 'em something
 
2014-02-26 01:18:43 PM  
Because you're wasting the time of everyone else in the class.  Like those idiots that keep asking stupid questions until you finally just use the time to take a nap.
 
2014-02-26 01:18:47 PM  
media.skynews.com
I will eat your cock
Glad to know I am lazy and not dyslexic
 
2014-02-26 01:19:29 PM  
I grew up on the west coast and spent some time in SC/Georgia and was amazed at how some schools run special ed. The gist of it is that they put anyone they feel is behind (i.e. black) in special ed because they aren't expected to do well and thus no longer have to really teach them anything. Not only that, in some areas schools get extra cash for each special ed student because they're supposedly harder to deal with.
 
2014-02-26 01:20:18 PM  
More disorders = more pharmaceuticals.  It's a racket, I tell ya.
 
2014-02-26 01:22:56 PM  

dv-ous: They learn to read in the slow learners class.

Slowly.

And with frequent interruptions to deal with the real psychos.

Best shot is to get a tutor, adapt, overcome, and get mainstreamed ASAP. Because you'll just get further and further behind every year otherwise.

Crapping your pants to annoy your teacher when you're in 8th grade isn't normal, but in Special Ed it is.


My son is 30 months old, and he's been in speech therapy since he was 18 months.  He actually understands language on a normal level, he just doesn't talk at a normal level.  I put him in preschool for 2 year olds, and after 3 weeks and six cumulative hours, the teacher was ready to diagnose him with autism (which, no, he isn't).  But most teachers would rather pawn off children with problems rather than deal with them.  We asked the therapist to do his sessions during class, and he's done so well that in just a few months, he's completely integrated and doesn't need help with the class anymore.  Some kids just need a bit of help, but teachers aren't necessarily the people to provide it.
 
2014-02-26 01:25:49 PM  

JackieRabbit: Dyslexia does exist, but it is rather rare. Lazy kids who refuse to read and get behind get the label, just as disruptive little brats get the label ADHD.


Dyslexia is rare?

Can you cite your source?
 
2014-02-26 01:25:53 PM  

zelachang: I grew up on the west coast and spent some time in SC/Georgia and was amazed at how some schools run special ed. The gist of it is that they put anyone they feel is behind (i.e. black) in special ed because they aren't expected to do well and thus no longer have to really teach them anything. Not only that, in some areas schools get extra cash for each special ed student because they're supposedly harder to deal with.


That is not at all limited to SC/Georgia. I have heard the same complaint from nearly every area of the country. It's a really difficult problem that the educational needs to address better than they currently do.
 
2014-02-26 01:25:59 PM  
and....cure teh gay...
 
2014-02-26 01:27:32 PM  
justafarkingchef
2014-02-26 01:16:23 PM


Exactly! And those blind kids who are too lazy to see?
Because a false dichotomy is sure to sway the ignorant.
 
2014-02-26 01:28:44 PM  
My elementary school used to pair kids that weren't understanding how to read with those that were advanced. I taught about three of my classmates how to read. It's not an appropriate solution for all learning disabilities but it works for some milder ones and for kids that don't really have one but have different skill sets and are having trouble.
 
2014-02-26 01:29:15 PM  

zelachang: I grew up on the west coast and spent some time in SC/Georgia and was amazed at how some schools run special ed. The gist of it is that they put anyone they feel is behind (i.e. black) in special ed because they aren't expected to do well and thus no longer have to really teach them anything. Not only that, in some areas schools get extra cash for each special ed student because they're supposedly harder to deal with.


I've always believed there should be a category of special ed called: SPS.  (shiatty Parents Syndrome).   I'm guessing the classes would be somewhat large -- but then at least we can stop telling the students they're fundamentally broken when, in reality, they just need to be deprogrammed.
 
2014-02-26 01:29:55 PM  

bborchar: dv-ous: They learn to read in the slow learners class.

Slowly.

And with frequent interruptions to deal with the real psychos.

Best shot is to get a tutor, adapt, overcome, and get mainstreamed ASAP. Because you'll just get further and further behind every year otherwise.

Crapping your pants to annoy your teacher when you're in 8th grade isn't normal, but in Special Ed it is.

My son is 30 months old, and he's been in speech therapy since he was 18 months.  He actually understands language on a normal level, he just doesn't talk at a normal level.  I put him in preschool for 2 year olds, and after 3 weeks and six cumulative hours, the teacher was ready to diagnose him with autism (which, no, he isn't).  But most teachers would rather pawn off children with problems rather than deal with them.  We asked the therapist to do his sessions during class, and he's done so well that in just a few months, he's completely integrated and doesn't need help with the class anymore.   Some kids just need a bit of help, but teachers aren't necessarily the people to provide it.


Especially if that teacher has 25-30 OTHER kids in the class that don't need that extra bit of help...they're stuck waiting around for the "special" kid to catch up, which in turn causes them to get bored and not like learning....Special ed classes exist for a reason, though I readily admit that they are used and abused by schools/teachers/administrators that just want to keep all of the "problem kids" in one general area so they can be better corraled...
 
2014-02-26 01:29:59 PM  

Anayalator: Teach brain dead people to get better


Didn't work for you, did it?
 
2014-02-26 01:30:07 PM  

pkellmey: zelachang: I grew up on the west coast and spent some time in SC/Georgia and was amazed at how some schools run special ed. The gist of it is that they put anyone they feel is behind (i.e. black) in special ed because they aren't expected to do well and thus no longer have to really teach them anything. Not only that, in some areas schools get extra cash for each special ed student because they're supposedly harder to deal with.

That is not at all limited to SC/Georgia. I have heard the same complaint from nearly every area of the country. It's a really difficult problem that the educational needs to address better than they currently do.


It probably is, I don't have a background in K-12 education so this I'm not super read on the subject.  I just find it crazy that the standards for labeling kids as "special" are so lax that combined with perverse incentives essentially leads to a whole population of kids getting boned for no reason.
 
2014-02-26 01:30:40 PM  

strangeluck: JackieRabbit: Dyslexia does exist, but it is rather rare. Lazy kids who refuse to read and get behind get the label, just as disruptive little brats get the label ADHD.

Dyslexia is rare?

Can you cite your source?


I haven't caught it yet. It must be rare.
 
2014-02-26 01:31:38 PM  

bborchar: My son is 30 months old


No, he's 2 and a half years old.

/serious pet peeve.
 
2014-02-26 01:32:06 PM  
I knew it! I'm not slysdexic after all!
 
2014-02-26 01:34:27 PM  
I went from a nice elementary school where I was labeled dyslexic, and was sent to a special class once a week where they had lessons to help, but every other class was normal (actuallyw as int eh fast reading group in the normal class, but my writing was shiat) to a middle school where that lable meant slow classes in every subject and sitting in with legit tards and criminals for a period.

The lable isn;t the problem, it is what schools do about it.
 
2014-02-26 01:34:47 PM  

What_do_you_want_now: bborchar: My son is 30 months old

No, he's 2 and a half years old.

/serious pet peeve.


I just turned 432 months old last week.

I am curious: what is a reasonable age to stop measuring a child's age in months? I stopped at 1 year old with my kids. The wife stopped at 2.
 
2014-02-26 01:35:50 PM  

bborchar: dv-ous: They learn to read in the slow learners class.

Slowly.

And with frequent interruptions to deal with the real psychos.

Best shot is to get a tutor, adapt, overcome, and get mainstreamed ASAP. Because you'll just get further and further behind every year otherwise.

Crapping your pants to annoy your teacher when you're in 8th grade isn't normal, but in Special Ed it is.

My son is 30 months old, and he's been in speech therapy since he was 18 months.  He actually understands language on a normal level, he just doesn't talk at a normal level.  I put him in preschool for 2 year olds, and after 3 weeks and six cumulative hours, the teacher was ready to diagnose him with autism (which, no, he isn't).  But most teachers would rather pawn off children with problems rather than deal with them.  We asked the therapist to do his sessions during class, and he's done so well that in just a few months, he's completely integrated and doesn't need help with the class anymore.  Some kids just need a bit of help, but teachers aren't necessarily the people to provide it.


Einstein didn't talk until he was 4.
Schools have charts and cannot be bothered with anyone or anything that does not fit in their narrow parameters.
 
2014-02-26 01:37:00 PM  

funzyr: I am curious: what is a reasonable age to stop measuring a child's age in months? I stopped at 1 year old with my kids. The wife stopped at 2.


1 year is where I put it. When you reach a second form of generally accepted units (Inches -> Feet) then you should use it. It makes communication far more precise.
 
2014-02-26 01:37:39 PM  
I was moderately dyslexic as a kid and basically didn't learn to read.until long after college. Fortunately, I was smart enough to get the gist of most material from class room instruction. There were courses that exposed my problem. Chemistry, for example, in high school. The Uniform Commercial Code in law school. (The UCC is ~120 pages of memorization.) So, I gravitated toward subjects that could be reduced to logical principles. Like programming. I still don't read well and -- driving my wife nuts -- re-read favorites rather than try new works. (I keep discovering new things!)

One of the most embarrassing moments before I retired came when there was an important bit of information relayed well into the body of an email. After around 2 paragraphs, letters tend to fuse into nonsense for me if I tackle the work at normal speeds. So, I didn't take the time to finish the email. And eventually had to confess to not being able to read. (Yes, it's actually not able to read well.) I was in my middle 50s.

No hectoring has ever helped me in the least.
 
2014-02-26 01:39:03 PM  

Fizpez: Tell alcoholics to stop drinking and drug addicts to stop using, fatties to stop eating and sad people to "cheer up!"


Just Stop It!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ow0lr63y4Mw
 
2014-02-26 01:42:46 PM  
can we at least admit that some kids are just dumb?  No Child Left Behind should really be Your Dumb Child Will Be Left Behind.  Let the dummies eat play-doh, teach the ones that learn.  We will need burger flippers in the future, too.
 
2014-02-26 01:43:30 PM  
bborchar:

My son is 30 months old, and he's been in speech therapy since he was 18 months.  He actually understands language on a normal level, he just doesn't talk at a normal level.  I put him in preschool for 2 year olds, and after 3 weeks and six cumulative hours, the teacher was ready to diagnose him with autism (which, no, he isn't).  But most teachers would rather pawn off children with problems rather than deal with them.  We asked the therapist to do his sessions during class, and he's done so well that in just a few months, he's completely integrated and doesn't need help with the class anymore.  Some kids just need a bit of help, but teachers aren't necessarily the people to provide it.

I saw what you did there. Bravo
 
2014-02-26 01:43:41 PM  
CSB:

I learned to read when I was two.
My Grandmother was a special needs teacher for her entire career and both her, and my mom taught me, because I was too rambunctious otherwise to keep entertained.
I have trouble with spelling and reading(numbers included)- sometimes the letters/digits look mixed up, or I mix them up without intending to. Frequently.
But, in school, if I was confused, I went back and read the passage/problem again, and due to high brain power otherwise, nobody noticed if I had a difficulty at all. For spelling- I fixed it by following phonetics, usually. I graduated top of my class from high school, and have a B.S, in Math/Physics.

Just saying that not everybody who has dyslexia will have problems in school, and not everybody who actually has it is currently diagnosed; same is true of the inverse of both statements.
 
2014-02-26 01:46:40 PM  

Fizpez: Tell alcoholics to stop drinking and drug addicts to stop using, fatties to stop eating and sad people to "cheer up!"


/my GOD! I can solve all the world's problems like that.


And "just get over" the interface change, amiright?
 
2014-02-26 01:47:03 PM  

frepnog: can we at least admit that some kids are just dumb?  No Child Left Behind should really be Your Dumb Child Will Be Left Behind.  Let the dummies eat play-doh, teach the ones that learn.  We will need burger flippers in the future, too.


Getting ready to retire?
 
2014-02-26 01:51:36 PM  

funzyr: frepnog: can we at least admit that some kids are just dumb?  No Child Left Behind should really be Your Dumb Child Will Be Left Behind.  Let the dummies eat play-doh, teach the ones that learn.  We will need burger flippers in the future, too.

Getting ready to retire?


not yet.  I flipped burgers in my youth - from what I can tell, from the employees I see working at burger joints, I'll probably flip them in old age as well.

fact is tho that some kids are just dumb.  why teach dummies algebra?  teach the dummies how to make mac and cheese and how to make change and send them on.
 
2014-02-26 01:54:26 PM  
Has gotten thousands of dyslexics to sign for reverse mortgages.

Even after giving them a free lighted magnifier

media.skynews.com
 
2014-02-26 01:57:29 PM  
We don't teach them to read because 1. people won't pay the taxes needed to ensure that everyone gets a first-class primary education, 2. many if not most teachers and administrators are indifferent to the challenges of the learning-disabled, and 3. half the country thinks ignorance is bliss.
 
2014-02-26 02:00:32 PM  

frepnog: funzyr: frepnog: can we at least admit that some kids are just dumb?  No Child Left Behind should really be Your Dumb Child Will Be Left Behind.  Let the dummies eat play-doh, teach the ones that learn.  We will need burger flippers in the future, too.

Getting ready to retire?

not yet.  I flipped burgers in my youth - from what I can tell, from the employees I see working at burger joints, I'll probably flip them in old age as well.

fact is tho that some kids are just dumb.  why teach dummies algebra?  teach the dummies how to make mac and cheese and how to make change and send them on.


The problem with your brilliant plan in educational practice, the definition of "dumb" is usually "not my kid", "not the rich guy's kid", "troublemaker", or "minority".
 
2014-02-26 02:04:47 PM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: Well if they do that then their less than stellar test scores will bring down the average.


We can't have that


this

and that we cant loose funding that we are receiving
paychecks and evaluations are on the line
 
2014-02-26 02:07:33 PM  
www.quickmeme.com
 
2014-02-26 02:26:51 PM  

Fissile: [www.quickmeme.com image 540x720]


I've seen that hundreds of times, and just now noticed he's holding a beer AND a cigarette :-)
 
2014-02-26 02:30:50 PM  
Here's a list of symptoms of Dyslexia from a Yale website.  Does that list look even remotely scientific?

Are You An Out-of-the-Box Thinker? A Slow Reader?

You May Be Dyslexic If You...

...Read slowly and with much effort

...Are often the one to solve the problem

...Can't spell; have messy handwriting

...Your writing shows terrific imagination

...Have trouble remembering dates and names

...Think out-of-the box, grasp the big picture

...Have difficulty retrieving and pronouncing
spoken words


...Have excellent vocabulary and ideas
 
2014-02-26 02:35:28 PM  
imgs.xkcd.com
 
2014-02-26 02:42:54 PM  
True dyslexics, the total non-reader, are rare.  In 35 years of teaching special ed I can remember only two.  Every other student was able to learn to read at least at a functional level.  It took lots of time, sometimes an hour or more per day, and several approaches for some.  A  luxury a classroom teacher with 25 to 30 students didn't have.

In the U.S. the label is mandatory if special ed is to be provided.  I've been retired for several years, so things may have changed, in fact have for the worse according my former colleagues.  But when I was in the field:

To be given a label (in my state at least) the State Department of Education required three in-class interventions of six weeks, each preceded by a meeting of the teacher, parents, special ed teacher, psychologist and possibly an adaptive PE specialist and speech therapist. If, after the three six week pre-referral session the student didn't improve a referral was made, evaluations and observations by a psychologist, resource teacher, adaptive PE specialist, audiologist, and possibly speech therapist are required.  In addition my team usually recommended an eye exam.  We then held a Child Study Team meeting consisting of the parents, the school administrator and everyone who had tested/observed the student to identify the handicapping condition and assign a label.   This was followed by an Individual Educational Program meeting of the same team where methods, materials, time and personal were determined.  The evaluation and identification process, if followed to the letter, could take up to two months, all though it usually only took four to six weeks.

Using this method we were often able to delay help for the student for up most of the school year, and sometimes into the following school year.

The benefit of all this was two-fold.  First it prevented identifying more than the Federal guidelines determining the percentage of handicapped students per school.  Second, it kept expenses down since extra dollars were given the school for each special ed student.

The student?  Well, he/she will be okay, don't worry about him/her.

Note:  We usually faked the 18 week pre-referral process and skipped to finding out why the student wasn't learning and figuring out how to provide help.  Apparently the state caught on and now requires meeting results be emailed to them within hours of the meeting.

I'm so glad to be retired.

Note two:  One miraculous cure was made when I required a 12 grade student to have an eye exam as part of the testing process.   His reading level jumped from second to sixth grade when he got glasses.  The optometrist said the kid had about the worst astigmatism he'd ever seen.
 
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