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(Huffington Post)   Words with no direct English translation. Fargin: "To wholeheartedly appreciate the successes of others." Still looking for Bastages   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 24
    More: Interesting, Eskimos, Greeks  
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1244 clicks; posted to Geek » on 25 Feb 2014 at 2:28 PM (48 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



24 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-02-25 02:32:49 PM  
relevant

/thank you
 
2014-02-25 02:54:27 PM  
www.alaska-in-pictures.com
 
2014-02-25 03:00:36 PM  
www.bolgernow.com

Roman Maronie approves this message, you bastages.
 
2014-02-25 03:11:11 PM  
Fargin? Must be Swedish.
 
2014-02-25 03:13:59 PM  
Best quote....
"I would like to direct this to the distinguished members of the panel: You lousy cork-soakers. You have violated my farging rights. Dis somanumbatching country was founded so that the liberties of common patriotic citizens like me could not be taken away by a bunch of fargin iceholes... like yourselves."
 
2014-02-25 03:21:35 PM  
Oh, THIS article again. Or maybe I'm just experiencing déjà vu.

/lots of words have no direct English translation
//we simply adopt them
 
2014-02-25 03:33:47 PM  
Aşermek

Pica.
 
2014-02-25 03:34:07 PM  
img.fark.net
 
2014-02-25 04:28:16 PM  
ArcadianRefugee:

//we simply adopt them

This. There is no such thing as a word with no English translation because if such a word exists we simply adopt it. The greatest strength of English is precisely the fact that it the mother whore of languages.
 
2014-02-25 04:38:18 PM  
So, word nerds, if you haven't seen Etymonline yet, it's almost as bad as TV tropes. Start out with "nice" to see how the meaning of a word changes over time. It also includes the origin of various phrases, along with variations on them. For example, "mad as a wet hen" is still in somewhat common usage today, but there used to be "as wanton as a wet hen" and "colder than a wet hen", among others.
 
2014-02-25 05:04:46 PM  

phyrkrakr: So, word nerds, if you haven't seen Etymonline yet, it's almost as bad as TV tropes. Start out with "nice" to see how the meaning of a word changes over time. It also includes the origin of various phrases, along with variations on them. For example, "mad as a wet hen" is still in somewhat common usage today, but there used to be "as wanton as a wet hen" and "colder than a wet hen", among others.


No Tv tropes is a lot worse.  I have a hard time knowing when to stop with TV tropes.  This Etymonline I have no urge to keep going.  Although the apparent original meaning of "nice" may answer the question why the nice guys don't get the girls in real life.

I also realized you could fargin and have schadenfreude at the same time.  Granted, it would be with different (groups of) people.
 
2014-02-25 05:06:09 PM  
Oy, veh! The fargin* Swedes make me wretch like a warm Cream Soda on a hot day.

Stupid Flandersen.

*It's Yiddish. Who knew?
 
2014-02-25 05:08:04 PM  
Correction: Retch.
 
2014-02-25 05:25:18 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: Oh, THIS article again. Or maybe I'm just experiencing déjà vu.

/lots of words have no direct English translation
//we simply adopt them


This. It's like saying there's no word for "a cloth tied around the top of the head" in English when the word bandana was taken from portugese/hindu.
 
2014-02-25 05:29:43 PM  
Subby, you're deservin of a fraggin for failing to utilize the far superior bastiches.

www.dccomics.com
 
2014-02-25 05:32:15 PM  
Time for Sniglets and Son of Sniglets.
 
2014-02-25 06:14:17 PM  
When they say 'no direct translation' they mean 'in a single word'. The direct translation of 'Fargin' in English is 'To wholeheartedly appreciate the successes of others'.

It might not be as concise, but it isn't as if it doesn't actually translate.

I'd have titled the article "Words English is going to steal".
 
2014-02-25 06:53:53 PM  

47 is the new 42: phyrkrakr: So, word nerds, if you haven't seen Etymonline yet, it's almost as bad as TV tropes. Start out with "nice" to see how the meaning of a word changes over time. It also includes the origin of various phrases, along with variations on them. For example, "mad as a wet hen" is still in somewhat common usage today, but there used to be "as wanton as a wet hen" and "colder than a wet hen", among others.

No Tv tropes is a lot worse.  I have a hard time knowing when to stop with TV tropes.  This Etymonline I have no urge to keep going.  Although the apparent original meaning of "nice" may answer the question why the nice guys don't get the girls in real life.

I also realized you could fargin and have schadenfreude at the same time.  Granted, it would be with different (groups of) people.


I need my TV Tropes! I'm getting the shakes man, the shakes!
 
2014-02-25 07:08:58 PM  
worlddan: There is no such thing as a word with no English translation because if such a word exists we simply adopt it. The greatest strength of English is precisely the fact that it the mother whore of languages.

What I'd like to see is words that exist in English that exist nowhere else.  After all, we've been stealing words for so long, we must have a smorgasbord of remnants from extinct languages.
 
2014-02-25 07:57:26 PM  

worlddan: ArcadianRefugee:

//we simply adopt them

This. There is no such thing as a word with no English translation because if such a word exists we simply adopt it. The greatest strength of English is precisely the fact that it the mother whore of languages.


That and half the words on that list, a good enough word to be used in context is used within the description, and some of them are easily approached with single words in english.

IE rustling leaves  OMG we don't have a word for that!

If they were truely interesting or abstract from english, they wouldn't be able to sum them up with short sentences.

Others are names for things we all know what they are on sight, they just happen to have had someone bother to come up with a term for that particular variation. IE We do have coffee-ring, and watermark, stain, etc.

A couple of the entries are more than one word.
IE
Koi No Yokan = Premonition of Love

Article writer can go to hell.
 
2014-02-25 11:25:18 PM  
What about semprini?
 
2014-02-26 01:51:59 AM  
 
2014-02-26 04:55:37 AM  
Ummmm mudita?
 
2014-02-26 05:07:57 PM  
Kummerspeck?

/supposedly weight gained as a result of emotional overeating - literally 'grief-bacon'
//by the folks who brought you 'baumwolle' (tree-wool) for cotton and 'handschuh' for glove
 
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