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(Click Orlando)   First gas stations had self-serve islands, then grocery stores had self-checkout lanes. DIY in-hospital maternity wards are just the next step   (clickorlando.com) divider line 34
    More: Florida, Boynton Beach, Ali Said, emergency management, births, islands  
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2233 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Feb 2014 at 9:13 AM (33 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



34 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-02-25 08:47:45 AM  
img.fark.net
 
2014-02-25 09:14:36 AM  
I bet the doctors still charged him for the delivery.
 
2014-02-25 09:15:39 AM  
That's what kitchen tables were made for.
 
2014-02-25 09:17:13 AM  
Women have been DIYing this for millenia.

/induce & abandon is pretty low - and you can't just "hold it". Nurse should be canned.
//emergency c-section still wins priority
 
2014-02-25 09:18:14 AM  

BAMFinator: I bet the doctors still charged him for the delivery.


They probably added a memorable experience surcharge.
 
2014-02-25 09:18:46 AM  

BAMFinator: I bet the doctors still charged him for the delivery.


Worse - they'll get billed for the room, and the induce, and have to do the extra paperwork for an unattended birth!
 
2014-02-25 09:19:26 AM  

BAMFinator: I bet the doctors still charged him for the delivery.


At the very least you know they are going to charge them for the room and bed.

America's Medical System is a joke.

The nurses could have stayed in the room and assisted with the pregnancy instead of leaving the couple alone to fend for themselves.

Only after the birth had been completed did they bother coming back in to cut the Umbilical Cord, disgusting.
 
2014-02-25 09:19:59 AM  

pkellmey: That's what kitchen tables were made for.


It seems like the midwife industry would be more prevalent.  Locate the business near a hospital in case of complications, but it would probably be a lot cheaper for most and most would have healthy babies.
 
2014-02-25 09:24:26 AM  
I've played operation, I can totally remove whatever you need cheap!

/Also have worked with complex networks and read greys anatomy, hands are a little shaky though.
//Get what you pay for.
 
2014-02-25 09:31:03 AM  

loser0: Women have been DIYing this for millenia.

/induce & abandon is pretty low - and you can't just "hold it". Nurse should be canned.
//emergency c-section still wins priority


gfid:
It seems like the midwife industry would be more prevalent.  Locate the business near a hospital in case of complications, but it would probably be a lot cheaper for most and most would have healthy babies.

All of this.  Except DIYing has generally meant having some experienced older woman on hand, not the terrified first-time dad.

Also, the midwife industry in the US was systematically attacked by some doctors groups in the early 20th century, because doctors thought that they obviously knew more than (should get paid instead of) a bunch of old crones.
 
2014-02-25 09:33:05 AM  
In this case, the conception was also DIY.
 
2014-02-25 09:36:24 AM  
Hey subby, let's play where's the missing comma.
 
2014-02-25 09:42:51 AM  
yeah, somehow I think that hospital is gonna end up paying for that kid's schooling, from pre-K daycare to med school, along with two-week vacations in Aruba every summer.
 
2014-02-25 09:49:27 AM  

DoctorWhat: loser0: Women have been DIYing this for millenia.

/induce & abandon is pretty low - and you can't just "hold it". Nurse should be canned.
//emergency c-section still wins priority

gfid:
It seems like the midwife industry would be more prevalent.  Locate the business near a hospital in case of complications, but it would probably be a lot cheaper for most and most would have healthy babies.

All of this.  Except DIYing has generally meant having some experienced older woman on hand, not the terrified first-time dad.

Also, the midwife industry in the US was systematically attacked by some doctors groups in the early 20th century, because doctors thought that they obviously knew more than (should get paid instead of) a bunch of old crones.


And all we got for it were death rates that decreased by over 90 percent. I think we should count that as an improvement.
 
2014-02-25 09:53:46 AM  

DoctorWhat: loser0: Women have been DIYing this for millenia.

/induce & abandon is pretty low - and you can't just "hold it". Nurse should be canned.
//emergency c-section still wins priority

gfid:
It seems like the midwife industry would be more prevalent.  Locate the business near a hospital in case of complications, but it would probably be a lot cheaper for most and most would have healthy babies.

All of this.  Except DIYing has generally meant having some experienced older woman on hand, not the terrified first-time dad.

Also, the midwife industry in the US was systematically attacked by some doctors groups in the early 20th century, because doctors thought that they obviously knew more than (should get paid instead of) a bunch of old crones.


Not to mention that to open a birthing center you need a 'certificate of need'.  Good luck getting one anywhere near a hospital with a maternity ward.

Though my spawn was born in a hospital with a midwife and a doula.
 
2014-02-25 10:00:26 AM  

TheGreatGazoo: Though my spawn was born in a hospital with a midwife and a doula.


Was the dollar for the midwife?
//Got nothin'.
 
2014-02-25 10:11:45 AM  
He will call a lawyer and win enough to pay the bill and buy a subway.
 
2014-02-25 11:00:52 AM  
Uh yeah, just 60+ years ago it was the norm to give birth at home. Not exactly a parallel to gas pumps and self-checkouts.
 
2014-02-25 11:30:22 AM  

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Uh yeah, just 60+ years ago it was the norm to give birth at home. Not exactly a parallel to gas pumps and self-checkouts.


150 years ago it was safer to give birth at home.  Then some doctor had the crazy idea to make his staff wash their hands between patients.  And had his life ruined because other doctors were offended at the notion.  Most women could give birth with just a midwife in attendance.  Nice to do it at a hospital just in case, but you generally don't need a doctor for what every other species does unassisted.
 
2014-02-25 12:17:45 PM  

NewWorldDan: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Uh yeah, just 60+ years ago it was the norm to give birth at home. Not exactly a parallel to gas pumps and self-checkouts.

150 years ago it was safer to give birth at home.  Then some doctor had the crazy idea to make his staff wash their hands between patients.  And had his life ruined because other doctors were offended at the notion.  Most women could give birth with just a midwife in attendance.  Nice to do it at a hospital just in case, but you generally don't need a doctor for what every other species does unassisted.


We're physiologically remarkably different from other species (for instance, newborns of other species are expected to walk or swim within minutes of being born) and we tend to have a much lower tolerance for allowing humans, either mothers or children, to die during childbirth.
 
2014-02-25 12:20:46 PM  

NewWorldDan: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Uh yeah, just 60+ years ago it was the norm to give birth at home. Not exactly a parallel to gas pumps and self-checkouts.

150 years ago it was safer to give birth at home.  Then some doctor had the crazy idea to make his staff wash their hands between patients.  And had his life ruined because other doctors were offended at the notion.  Most women could give birth with just a midwife in attendance.  Nice to do it at a hospital just in case, but you generally don't need a doctor for what every other species does unassisted.


Not accurate at all.

All data shows that child rearing and child birth has become safer and more successful due to modern medical treatment and medicine.

If we went back to unassisted births and just doing it the way nature intended we'd be seeing extreme jumps in infant mortality rates and disease.

http://www.hrsa.gov/healthit/images/mchb_infantmortality_pub.pdf

i.imgur.com
 
2014-02-25 12:53:52 PM  
Get ready for your C-section
i60.tinypic.com
 
2014-02-25 01:58:24 PM  
May as well go to the YMCA and pop it out in the pool.
 
2014-02-25 02:12:52 PM  
Something similar happened to my mom and stepdad when my little brother was born. If traffic had been any slower on I-95, he would've been born in the Jeep.  As it was, the hospital was busy as hell and they put her on a gurney in a storage room for 5 minutes while they looked for a proper room.  My stepdad and a nurse delivered the baby themselves.

\Good thing they were at the hospital though, my brother needed heart surgery right away
 
msP
2014-02-25 04:25:55 PM  
I recently watched a documentary on Netflix called the Business of Being Born - I would suggest it to anyone who thinks that hospitals are always the better option for delivery (spoiler: they're not).
 
2014-02-25 06:53:42 PM  
Sure sounds like the start of some Idiocracy.
 
2014-02-26 10:11:22 AM  
FTFA: "The nurse said you have to wait and hold it. The doctor is busy with a C-section and that takes priority over you."
Ali says the nurse's comments left him stunned.
"How could they say something like that when you're giving a birth for a child?" Ali said. "The nurse walked out of the room and left us there alone."


But we're having a baby.  Why is this happening to usWe're alone and helpless and traumatized and OMG I need to whine to a reporter about it so that everyone knows how amazingly special we are.

Why the fark is this news?

/Kid's just born and already ruined forever
 
2014-02-26 10:18:10 AM  

gfid: pkellmey: That's what kitchen tables were made for.

It seems like the midwife industry would be more prevalent.  Locate the business near a hospital in case of complications, but it would probably be a lot cheaper for most and most would have healthy babies.

Don't need a doctor unless there are complication

Splish: DoctorWhat: loser0: Women have been DIYing this for millenia.

/induce & abandon is pretty low - and you can't just "hold it". Nurse should be canned.
//emergency c-section still wins priority

gfid:
It seems like the midwife industry would be more prevalent.  Locate the business near a hospital in case of complications, but it would probably be a lot cheaper for most and most would have healthy babies.

All of this.  Except DIYing has generally meant having some experienced older woman on hand, not the terrified first-time dad.

Also, the midwife industry in the US was systematically attacked by some doctors groups in the early 20th century, because doctors thought that they obviously knew more than (should get paid instead of) a bunch of old crones.

And all we got for it were death rates that decreased by over 90 percent. I think we should count that as an improvement.


I think you missed the point. Instead of integrating midwifes into the system, we eliminated them. Most of those improvements have nothing to do with the doctor. They have more to do with monitoring and follow-up. My wife just gave birth to our daughter a week ago, with nothing but a midwife, a nurse and me. Never even saw a doctor until the pediatrician came the to check the baby the next day.
 
2014-02-26 10:19:08 AM  
Sounds like the exact opposite of my first child's birth.  The doctor decided to augment my labor (for no reason whatsoever) by putting me on pitocin, which caused me to have such sudden and violent contractions that I started to throw up.  So then, instead of turning off the pitocin, they tell me to get an epidural to stop the pain.  However, the problem with that was my daughter's heart rate would drop whenever I tried to lay on my right side...so I had to lay on my left side for 7 hours, which caused one side to be so numb I couldn't even move my left leg.  When it came time for me to push, I seriously couldn't feel anything at all, not even the contractions I was supposedly having.  The doctor and nurse just stood there and talked, asking me 'when are you going to push? My shift ends soon'.  And because I actually felt like I was causing him a problem, I started pushing even though I didn't know when I was supposed to or what it was supposed to feel like.  My daughter was born healthy, but it caused me a lot of internal damage because I had pushed too hard...all because the doctor and nurse were acting as if I were 'inconveniencing' them by being in labor.

Second time around, I found a new doctor.  And when the nurse tried to put me on pitocin, I told her absolutely not.  The doctor came in maybe two or three times and another nurse came in to check on me, I walked around without any medication for 6 hours, finally got an epidural (which worked correctly) and had my son without any complications.  I learned that it pays to make sure you have a good support staff that doesn't just want to speed you along just to fit you on their 'schedule'.
 
2014-02-26 10:22:10 AM  

bborchar: Sounds like the exact opposite of my first child's birth.  The doctor decided to augment my labor (for no reason whatsoever) by putting me on pitocin, which caused me to have such sudden and violent contractions that I started to throw up.  So then, instead of turning off the pitocin, they tell me to get an epidural to stop the pain.  However, the problem with that was my daughter's heart rate would drop whenever I tried to lay on my right side...so I had to lay on my left side for 7 hours, which caused one side to be so numb I couldn't even move my left leg.  When it came time for me to push, I seriously couldn't feel anything at all, not even the contractions I was supposedly having.  The doctor and nurse just stood there and talked, asking me 'when are you going to push? My shift ends soon'.  And because I actually felt like I was causing him a problem, I started pushing even though I didn't know when I was supposed to or what it was supposed to feel like.  My daughter was born healthy, but it caused me a lot of internal damage because I had pushed too hard...all because the doctor and nurse were acting as if I were 'inconveniencing' them by being in labor.

Second time around, I found a new doctor.  And when the nurse tried to put me on pitocin, I told her absolutely not.  The doctor came in maybe two or three times and another nurse came in to check on me, I walked around without any medication for 6 hours, finally got an epidural (which worked correctly) and had my son without any complications.  I learned that it pays to make sure you have a good support staff that doesn't just want to speed you along just to fit you on their 'schedule'.


**Note**

A midwife was not an option for us...I have a medical condition that requires medication and a hospital setting.  I wanted it to be as unmedicated as possible, though, which the doctor worked with me and helped with that.
 
2014-02-26 10:29:30 AM  

bborchar: **Note**

A midwife was not an option for us...I have a medical condition that requires medication and a hospital setting.  I wanted it to be as unmedicated as possible, though, which the doctor worked with me and helped w


Here in France you could have had the midwife as it is all done in the hospital, medication is done by the anesthesiologist. My wife is allergic to some medications and this was all planned out ahead of time.
 
2014-02-26 11:01:43 AM  

TenJed_77: bborchar: **Note**

A midwife was not an option for us...I have a medical condition that requires medication and a hospital setting.  I wanted it to be as unmedicated as possible, though, which the doctor worked with me and helped w

Here in France you could have had the midwife as it is all done in the hospital, medication is done by the anesthesiologist. My wife is allergic to some medications and this was all planned out ahead of time.


I have Addison's disease, which means that anytime my body is under severe stress (such as childbirth), I need intravenous steroids and fluids or my blood pressure will drop and I will go into shock.  I also have Graves' disease on top of this, as well.  Because of this combination, I was considered 'high risk', so midwifes wouldn't come near me with a 10-foot pole.  I could have consulted a doula to help me, but I was fine without one.  My laboring technique consisted of talking to my sister on the phone, walking around my room and paying bills.  It was probably the most unexciting 'high risk' birth, but I was fine with that.  My doctor was unobtrusive and the second nurse was extremely helpful and supportive...the first nurse was an idiot, so I was glad when she left.  I have a friend who is a certified midwife, though, and they are very popular here.
 
2014-02-26 03:49:22 PM  
I really think that you would have been able to go with a midwife here in France. You are monitored form the moment you arrive at the hospital, in comfortable room, while waiting for the cervix to open. The midwife is the boss, until she(2 kids have yet to see a male midwife) thinks there is a problem, and at that moment she will call the doctor. Complete and total confidence in this system,the doctor is a few steps away at most. I took my wife for a walk out side on a nice 63° day, came back in they had her take a hot shower. Here you you write out a paper stating how you want your birthing to happen and they follow it. No matter the complications that could arise they have it covered.
 
2014-02-26 05:19:01 PM  

TenJed_77: I really think that you would have been able to go with a midwife here in France. You are monitored form the moment you arrive at the hospital, in comfortable room, while waiting for the cervix to open. The midwife is the boss, until she(2 kids have yet to see a male midwife) thinks there is a problem, and at that moment she will call the doctor. Complete and total confidence in this system,the doctor is a few steps away at most. I took my wife for a walk out side on a nice 63° day, came back in they had her take a hot shower. Here you you write out a paper stating how you want your birthing to happen and they follow it. No matter the complications that could arise they have it covered.


Well, it's a bit different here...malpractice insurance and all that.  But I was very happy with my second OB, she was really great and didn't have any problem with me letting things progress naturally.  That's one thing that I've noticed over here in the US...many labors will be augmented to speed them up, instead of using it as an actual tool to help with slow contractions.  My doctor understood that I didn't want that, and things progressed fine.  All in all, I was in labor 12 hours start to finish, and everything went smoothly.  I was really glad I changed practices between my first and second child, though.
 
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