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(KATU)   Evidently the mob handles the collections for the rent-to-own furniture business. Next up, rent-to-own coffins for collection agents   (katu.com) divider line 43
    More: Scary, KATU Problem Solvers, NW Freedom Corp., special agents, Oregon Attorney General, furniture, chess tactics  
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7966 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Feb 2014 at 11:11 AM (42 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
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2014-02-25 09:02:33 AM  
4 votes:
Here's a top tip; renting things like furniture and appliances always ends badly.
2014-02-25 12:15:50 PM  
3 votes:

TheShavingofOccam123: NW Freedom Corp. says that it conducted its own internal investigation and found its associates conducted business in a professional and ethical manner.

Since the SCOTUS ruled that corporations are people, can you get a restraining order against an entire corporation?


Seems that the most vile of companies like to have the word "Freedom" in their title, don'nit?

localtvwiti.files.wordpress.com
2014-02-25 12:01:20 PM  
3 votes:
From the article

Finally, last February, NW Freedom Corp., the company that runs the local Aaron's stores, signed an Assurance of Voluntary Compliance without admitting any guilt.  In it, the company agreed not to use 32 different strong-arm tactics to recover property or debt, including:
Entering a home without permission
Using abusive language
Posing as a police officer
Threatening arrest or criminal prosecution.

HOLY shiat. They must have the DA in their pocket if they're "Agreeing" not to do things like "Enter a home without permission" and "Pose as a police officer" as some sort of settlement. Can I get away with that? "I'm not going to be criminally prosecuted, and in return I've agreed not to kill anyone."
2014-02-25 11:42:02 AM  
3 votes:

bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com



This "Tough Guy" collection approach doesn't make any sense to me.  It's only going to eventually get them sued for FAR more than the crap they're out.

Why risk a (probably) VERY profitable business model screwing over poor people by doing this?  They should just keep to the proper ways:

1.  Letters/Phone calls.
2.  A couple of POLITE visits-- maybe with a second guy carrying a video camera to document that they're being nonthreatening
3.  Either go to court or sell the account to a debt collector and claim the loss on your taxes.


=======================================


My guess is when there's a loss, the franchise owner gets a stick up his/her ass that they've been "stolen" from and that they have some kind of right to threaten to break some kneecaps to get "their" stuff back, while in the meantime forgetting their WHOLE FREAKING BUSINESS MODEL is morally no better than theft from the poor and stupid.

These franchise owners just need to chill out, count their money, snort some coke  off a hooker's ass, and generally enjoy the rest of their lives until they eventually die and get reincarnated as a dung beetle with MS. Or something worse.
2014-02-25 11:18:27 AM  
3 votes:
1) Say "get off my property"
2) Call police to file complaint, use 911 line if the person won't leave
3) Call police again if the person shows back up
   3a) tell police he's threatening you with a gun and your scared for your life
   3b) Use your gun if he tries to come into your house
2014-02-25 09:10:28 AM  
3 votes:
"'Just let me walk through your house' is what he kept saying," Long said. "If you really don't have the furniture, you'll let me walk through your house. You'll let me go see for myself."

Just let me shoot you in the chest.  If you don't have a heart, you'll let me shoot you in the chest.
2014-02-25 12:10:47 PM  
2 votes:

groppet: At work my desk phone used to belong to a person that owed money to some rental places. The calls I hated getting the most were the automated ones at least with a person I could tell them she hasnt worked here in 3 years. It sucked because debt collection agencys would sell the debt and it would start all over. Its been about 8 months.


I went through that situation once before also. They didn't believe me when I said I wasn't the person they were looking for and the calls kept coming and were getting more and more hostile. So I eventually got the collection agency's number by telling them I had to call them back, and passed it on to my supervisor. I don't know what she did, but the calls stopped.
2014-02-25 12:10:20 PM  
2 votes:
"'Just let me walk through your house' is what he kept saying," Long said. "If you really don't have the furniture, you'll let me walk through your house. You'll let me go see for myself."

Yeah. That doesn't set off anyone's personal "Spidey Sense" one little bit. Nosirree!
2014-02-25 11:22:39 AM  
2 votes:
NW Freedom Corp. says that it conducted its own internal investigation and found its associates conducted business in a professional and ethical manner.

Since the SCOTUS ruled that corporations are people, can you get a restraining order against an entire corporation?
2014-02-25 03:56:26 PM  
1 votes:

interstellar_tedium: groppet: At work my desk phone used to belong to a person that owed money to some rental places. The calls I hated getting the most were the automated ones at least with a person I could tell them she hasnt worked here in 3 years. It sucked because debt collection agencys would sell the debt and it would start all over. Its been about 8 months.

My roomate was talking about renting furniture I told her fark no since she never had money anyways and I didnt want those people coming to my house looking for her. My roomate sucks about paying bills enough without this crap piled on.

I got a cell phone number that had belonged to someone with people after her and I still get the occasional call even after telling everyone for the last year plus that no I am not Julie (wrong gender), no I have no idea who she is or where she lives, and no I cannot pass a message on to someone I don't know and quite frankly never want to know.  I have the most obnoxious ones blocked, but there is always someone new popping up.  I had unfortunately had the number for several months before the calls started and had gone through all the trouble of telling everyone including all my work contacts that I had a new number and wasn't about to do it all again as it had been a big enough pain the first time.

These guys are pretty awful, I have had them curse at me, yell at me that I was just covering for her, attempt to threaten me with requiring me to pay her bills (yeah like that is going to work for someone I don't know), and just basically try to get a dime out of me.  I just basically tell them to fark off and stop calling or that I am going after them for harassment and that shuts them up at least for a while.  If anyone knows how to prevent some leach who has bought this bad debt starting the whole process over again I would love to hear it.


In most states the general attorney will do all the legal work for you and get you a bunch of money. These guys are breaking the law. Just cursing at you even if you own money gets you money.

Also, I don't answer a call if I don't know the number. Answering it just makes it worst cause they use auto dialers. Once you answer you get moved up the harass list. Do a search on the number, see what is reported and if a collector or sales just put them on the block list. My friend was biatching about what you were till he listened to me and stopped answering and just blocked them.

They will never ever believe you and when the junk debtor gives up he will just pass it off to another and the crap starts again.
2014-02-25 02:32:12 PM  
1 votes:

Lipspinach: The Pope of Manwich Village: I like to rent electronics, then pawn them for cash, then buy bitcoins and then buy BMTs from Subway. Makes the subs taste better for some reason.

What does BMT stand for anyway? I could never figure it out.



Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit  is part of the NYC subway system.  I believe it used to be an independent company.  When I lived in in NYC some of the lines were still identified as BMT, although it no longer really seemed to mean anything.  Hence the "subway" connection.

It would be like opening an airline-themed franchise and naming one of the menu items the "Pam Am."
2014-02-25 02:24:38 PM  
1 votes:
had an upstairs neighbor who got himself into one of those title loan places (on an old junker I GAVE him because i couldn't get it through inspection and he somehow was get it registered out of state).  The Recovery guys made the mistake of knocking on my door and pulling their "pretending to be cops bullshiat, demanding I show them where the cars was and sign this form they gave me or face prosecution for felony "obstruction of justice"

Sadly for them I am a lawyer with a lot of experience in criminal defense work and a bit of a short temper, so the encounter ended with a lot of harsh words and them fleeing the scene just ahead of the REAL local cops showing up to arrest them for impersonating police officers
2014-02-25 02:10:59 PM  
1 votes:

WTF Indeed: Here's a top tip; renting things like furniture and appliances always ends badly.


Except these assholes will show up when you didn't rent shiat from them. You know like the article was talking about.

I'd like to say this this is just a sensationalism but it isn't. You are not safe from these assholes even if you have nothing to do with them.
2014-02-25 02:03:36 PM  
1 votes:

IRQ12: redmid17: IRQ12: redmid17: 1) Say "get off my property"
2) Call police to file complaint, use 911 line if the person won't leave
3) Call police again if the person shows back up
   3a) tell police he's threatening you with a gun and your scared for your life
   3b) Use your gun if he tries to come into your house

The police will side with the collection guys, if they come out, in my experience.  (not personal, just know a few people who have dealt with this)

I would doubt that if the person they are looking for is not even living where they are sniffing around.


How would the police know if the person was there or not?  Or if the person lived there or not.


"Hello, 911? There's a man here threatening me. He's looking for my brother, but my brother isn't here and lives across the city/state. I've asked him to leave but he keeps trying to get into my house."
2014-02-25 01:59:39 PM  
1 votes:

groppet: At work my desk phone used to belong to a person that owed money to some rental places. The calls I hated getting the most were the automated ones at least with a person I could tell them she hasnt worked here in 3 years. It sucked because debt collection agencys would sell the debt and it would start all over. Its been about 8 months.

My roomate was talking about renting furniture I told her fark no since she never had money anyways and I didnt want those people coming to my house looking for her. My roomate sucks about paying bills enough without this crap piled on.


Heh, hate those automated calls with a passion.  I really can't contemplate what sort of clueless asshole thinks that's a good business model.
2014-02-25 01:50:04 PM  
1 votes:

bungle_jr: former RENT A CENTER employee here
i hated working there, after about 6 months or so...but i worked there right at 3 years. the final year was different, i was actually working in an ashley homestore, offering "alternative credit options" for folks who got turned down for ashley's credit.

the part i really hated was the collections. i hated the person i became during that time...i was typically nice & easy going, but when it came to certain deadbeat customers, i became a real arsehole...banging all around their house on the windows, doors, etc, to get their attention, etc.

only reason i stayed as long as i did is it paid more than other retail jobs i would've gotten in the area

groppet: One of the new guys on my team used to work at a rent to own place. He pretty much told the guys to never use them. Hell I knew that before he even told us. We have one coworker we nicknamed drama that is so far in the hole with some rent to own place she may never see the light of day.

umm, with rent-a-center, aarons, and the like, if you find yourself "in the hole", the easiest thing in the world to do is to let it go. just give the stuff back to them. it doesn't affect your credit in the least...they don't report to the agencies. there would be no legal action. there would simply be a termination of her rental agreement. the WORST thing that would happen is they say she couldn't rent merchandise at that store again.


I dont know exactly what the deal is with her, but she leaves letters in the common areas around work from collection places, renatal places about all the money she owes. I try not to pry, but damn it's hard not to notice red ink and bold black printing.
2014-02-25 01:28:36 PM  
1 votes:

Securitywyrm: From the article

Finally, last February, NW Freedom Corp., the company that runs the local Aaron's stores, signed an Assurance of Voluntary Compliance without admitting any guilt.  In it, the company agreed not to use 32 different strong-arm tactics to recover property or debt, including:
Entering a home without permission
Using abusive language
Posing as a police officer
Threatening arrest or criminal prosecution.

HOLY shiat. They must have the DA in their pocket if they're "Agreeing" not to do things like "Enter a home without permission" and "Pose as a police officer" as some sort of settlement. Can I get away with that? "I'm not going to be criminally prosecuted, and in return I've agreed not to kill anyone."


I have to take people to court for my job. I've seen people tell the judge I grabbed them, broken their glass doors etc. the judge always says the same thing: "Ok. Do you owe them the money?" Yes...but "judgement for plaintiff"

They know people will say ANYTHING to get out of paying. The DA here knows it too
2014-02-25 01:05:26 PM  
1 votes:

RoxtarRyan: Rent-to-own: For people who would rather pay $3,000 for a $600 couch, $2,000 for a $400 laptop, and $2,500 for a $500 TV.

And the circle of debt, poor financial management and poverty continues.


Paying over time is always more expensive. Poor people pay $2500 for a $500 TV and $4000 for a $500 computer over the time of the contract. Middle class people pay $35000 for a $30000 car. The premium one gets hit with in interest is lower than the rent to own screwing, but it's still a cost to buying on time over buying with cash. The bigger risk you are, the more you'll pay to have it sooner. The people who frequent rent to own places are notoriously poor credit risks; the costs of that kind of risk means you pay through the nose.

And yes, that's how you stay poor. There is a cycle of poverty, but then again, the people themselves are participating in it- nobody forces anybody to use rent to own.
2014-02-25 01:00:29 PM  
1 votes:
former RENT A CENTER employee here
i hated working there, after about 6 months or so...but i worked there right at 3 years. the final year was different, i was actually working in an ashley homestore, offering "alternative credit options" for folks who got turned down for ashley's credit.

the part i really hated was the collections. i hated the person i became during that time...i was typically nice & easy going, but when it came to certain deadbeat customers, i became a real arsehole...banging all around their house on the windows, doors, etc, to get their attention, etc.

only reason i stayed as long as i did is it paid more than other retail jobs i would've gotten in the area

groppet: One of the new guys on my team used to work at a rent to own place. He pretty much told the guys to never use them. Hell I knew that before he even told us. We have one coworker we nicknamed drama that is so far in the hole with some rent to own place she may never see the light of day.


umm, with rent-a-center, aarons, and the like, if you find yourself "in the hole", the easiest thing in the world to do is to let it go. just give the stuff back to them. it doesn't affect your credit in the least...they don't report to the agencies. there would be no legal action. there would simply be a termination of her rental agreement. the WORST thing that would happen is they say she couldn't rent merchandise at that store again.
2014-02-25 12:46:11 PM  
1 votes:

Lipspinach: The Pope of Manwich Village: I like to rent electronics, then pawn them for cash, then buy bitcoins and then buy BMTs from Subway. Makes the subs taste better for some reason.

What does BMT stand for anyway? I could never figure it out.


Biggest, meatiest, tastiest.

I have no idea why that is still rattling around in my brain, but I wish I could get it out of there.  It's taking up room for something more important.  I think it's from an ad campaign many years ago.
2014-02-25 12:31:58 PM  
1 votes:
My CSB time:

Back in the mid 80's, VCRs were still a bit pricey and I was in need of one. Not knowing then what I know now about rent-to-own joints, I not only got one from them, but it was a top-of-the line $700 (retail) Stereo HiFi VCR (it was a weird little model from Zenith that took in cassettes inserted sideways).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7IbQZr-XbFg

Anyways, near the end of the rental contract, it started to suddenly die on me as if the power cord was pulled. Several repairs were attempted but the problem continued. Since they no longer made that type of VCR anymore, I used my side of the contract to request a new VCR in replacement, AND it had to be one of equal value (not some crap-ass bargain basement one). The store owner himself tried to weasel his way out of it, but I read him the contract word for word which TOLD him his legal obligations. He knew he wasn't dealing with some ghetto dumbass and he had no choice, so I ended up with a $1200 primo JVC S-VHS deck.

a248.e.akamai.net

Before DVDs came along, this was some good stuff.

I came out of the experience about how slimy rent-to-own places are, and felt satisfied that I at least in a way got my money back.
2014-02-25 12:31:18 PM  
1 votes:

AugieDoggyDaddy: redmid17: AugieDoggyDaddy: redmid17: 1) Say "get off my property"
2) Call police to file complaint, use 911 line if the person won't leave
3) Call police again if the person shows back up
   3a) tell police he's threatening you with a gun and your scared for your life
   3b) Use your gun if he tries to come into your house

ADD--3a)  Don't  say "gun"  unless there is a gun or he has implied he has a gun.   It's Ok to say you feel threatend.  Just don't make stuff up.
          3b)  Unless you live in Floriduh,  avoid using you gun.  Shooting someone in your home, even if legaly justified will cause you long term inconvience.

The guy in the story did say he was going to come back with his 9mm, so that's what I was responding to.
If someone actually tries to come into your house ( ie force their way in), I'm not sure there's a state in the union that doesn't allow you to use force to put them down. Forced entry into a house is generally a forcible felony. IANAL but most states and self-defense laws allow you to use lethal force to prevent a forcible felony.

You are right.  But one thing I know is that the word GUN causes the cops to come to your house (or wharehouse, as in my case)  very quickly, with guns drawn.  I'm not anti cop,  but we've had enough threads here about what can happen with over exited cops come to your home.

I'll still say it's best to avoid shooting someone.


I'd avoid shooting people if possible but if a rental store "Agent" were trying to kick down my door and "impound" things not in my house, I'd probably stay on the line and only shoot if they came in. I don't want to get shot by cops either and being on the phone with dispatch would hopefully prevent that.
2014-02-25 12:27:07 PM  
1 votes:
Many years ago, right after we got married & were poor, we looked into renting some stuff from a rent-to-own place. Not being total financial morons, we took one look at the contract & said not only No, but FARK NO!!!
We figured out it'd be cheaper just to get a store credit card & buy stuff that way, we'd pay interest but not nearly as much as those bloodsuckers wanted.
2014-02-25 12:21:36 PM  
1 votes:

AugieDoggyDaddy: redmid17: 1) Say "get off my property"
2) Call police to file complaint, use 911 line if the person won't leave
3) Call police again if the person shows back up
   3a) tell police he's threatening you with a gun and your scared for your life
   3b) Use your gun if he tries to come into your house
 
3a)  Don't  say "gun"  unless there is a gun or he has implied he has a gun.   It's Ok to say you feel threatend.  Just don't make stuff up.
3b)  Unless you live in Floriduh,  avoid using you gun.  Shooting someone in your home, even if legaly justified will cause you long term inconvience.


Just say " I think he has a gun or something".
2014-02-25 12:16:40 PM  
1 votes:

redmid17: AugieDoggyDaddy: redmid17: 1) Say "get off my property"
2) Call police to file complaint, use 911 line if the person won't leave
3) Call police again if the person shows back up
   3a) tell police he's threatening you with a gun and your scared for your life
   3b) Use your gun if he tries to come into your house
 
3a)  Don't  say "gun"  unless there is a gun or he has implied he has a gun.   It's Ok to say you feel threatend.  Just don't make stuff up.
3b)  Unless you live in Floriduh,  avoid using you gun.  Shooting someone in your home, even if legaly justified will cause you long term inconvience.

The guy in the story did say he was going to come back with his 9mm, so that's what I was responding to.
If someone actually tries to come into your house ( ie force their way in), I'm not sure there's a state in the union that doesn't allow you to use force to put them down. Forced entry into a house is generally a forcible felony. IANAL but most states and self-defense laws allow you to use lethal force to prevent a forcible felony.


Hard to believe but not all states have a Castle doctrine and in others you have a duty to flee.  http://source.southuniversity.edu/castle-doctrine-from-state-to-state - 46514.aspx
2014-02-25 12:16:03 PM  
1 votes:

redmid17: AugieDoggyDaddy: redmid17: 1) Say "get off my property"
2) Call police to file complaint, use 911 line if the person won't leave
3) Call police again if the person shows back up
   3a) tell police he's threatening you with a gun and your scared for your life
   3b) Use your gun if he tries to come into your house
 
ADD--3a)  Don't  say "gun"  unless there is a gun or he has implied he has a gun.   It's Ok to say you feel threatend.  Just don't make stuff up.
          3b)  Unless you live in Floriduh,  avoid using you gun.  Shooting someone in your home, even if legaly justified will cause you long term inconvience.

The guy in the story did say he was going to come back with his 9mm, so that's what I was responding to.
If someone actually tries to come into your house ( ie force their way in), I'm not sure there's a state in the union that doesn't allow you to use force to put them down. Forced entry into a house is generally a forcible felony. IANAL but most states and self-defense laws allow you to use lethal force to prevent a forcible felony.


You are right.  But one thing I know is that the word GUN causes the cops to come to your house (or wharehouse, as in my case)  very quickly, with guns drawn.  I'm not anti cop,  but we've had enough threads here about what can happen with over exited cops come to your home.

I'll still say it's best to avoid shooting someone.
2014-02-25 12:11:12 PM  
1 votes:
Apparently the house I own now must of had someone living there previously that did some rent to own shiat, cause one of those companies has been coming around a lot.

About 3-4 days ago, while I was on the computer in the back room, the doorbell rang and the little girl, who isn't supposed to answer the door ran to it and my girlfriend went to check too. I heard some talking and got up to see some dude in my house with a shirt on that had one of them companies on his chest tag.

Honestly, I was pissed as hell he was inside my home, but my girlfriend is naive as hell about people. After having him leave, I explained what he was and why he was there, it never dawned on her what the company was, but I was like, don't ever invite those people into our home, he wasn't being nice, he was scoping the place out because he thinks you were lying to him about that person no longer being there and not having their shiat still.

Look I hate those companies just as much as the next, but I don't go out of my way to rat people out for Corporate interest. I told even if we had the contact information for that person, I'd never give it out, it's not my place, and I'm not doing their job for them, especially for free.
2014-02-25 12:08:50 PM  
1 votes:

mike_d85: 2 - This is reasonable, but I'm pretty sure unconsented video taping opens another legal can of worms.  Maybe not.


Only in a few states. Even in those states, as long as you're in public you don't have an expectation of privacy. They can sidestep that requirement by saying they are taping you.

mike_d85: 3 - If rental places lawyered up that all of the money goes to the lawyer.  It's just not really cost effective.  Selling to a collections agency would mitigate some losses but if word got out that you never came and collected your stuff you'd get ransacked by word of mouth advertising that they can just screw you over.  What do you think they're worried about?  Their credit score?  They're renting basic household items, they're beyond that.

If you want effective collection, you need police involvement (same as the sheriff evicting someone).  You don't have to call every time you visit, but it needs to escalate to that level at some point.  You need to be able to TAKE THE OBJECTS BACK and there needs to be a system in place to do that that people are aware of.


They don't really have to lawyer up. They can send someone to small claims court with proof of non-payment after a small filing fee. If you win, I'm pretty sure you can get a court order for collection of property or something of equivalent value (in most states IIRC). That's how a few home owners got their money back from large banks like BOA after they got wrongfully foreclose.
2014-02-25 12:03:02 PM  
1 votes:

Inflatable Rhetoric: The Pope of Manwich Village: Lipspinach: The Pope of Manwich Village: I like to rent electronics, then pawn them for cash, then buy bitcoins and then buy BMTs from Subway. Makes the subs taste better for some reason.

What does BMT stand for anyway? I could never figure it out.

"Byproducts, Mayonnaise and Tomato," I think. I like mine toasted.

Boston Mass Transit?

Better Make Time?

Be My .... ??


I asked that question to about 20 different Subway employees. Finally, I was told it stood for "Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit," after the NYC subway system.
2014-02-25 12:02:02 PM  
1 votes:

mike_d85: Riche: This "Tough Guy" collection approach doesn't make any sense to me.  It's only going to eventually get them sued for FAR more than the crap they're out.

Why risk a (probably) VERY profitable business model screwing over poor people by doing this?  They should just keep to the proper ways:

1.  Letters/Phone calls.
2.  A couple of POLITE visits-- maybe with a second guy carrying a video camera to document that they're being nonthreatening
3.  Either go to court or sell the account to a debt collector and claim the loss on your taxes.


=======================================


My guess is when there's a loss, the franchise owner gets a stick up his/her ass that they've been "stolen" from and that they have some kind of right to threaten to break some kneecaps to get "their" stuff back, while in the meantime forgetting their WHOLE FREAKING BUSINESS MODEL is morally no better than theft from the poor and stupid.

These franchise owners just need to chill out, count their money, snort some coke  off a hooker's ass, and generally enjoy the rest of their lives until they eventually die and get reincarnated as a dung beetle with MS. Or something worse.

I think you're out of touch with the ghetto.

1 - Poor people are so used to bill collectors that they don't react to phone calls and letters unless they have a windfall.  Literally, you have to shut the lights out or evict them.  Without the knowledge that things can go that far, you are powerless.

2 - This is reasonable, but I'm pretty sure unconsented video taping opens another legal can of worms.  Maybe not.

3 - If rental places lawyered up that all of the money goes to the lawyer.  It's just not really cost effective.  Selling to a collections agency would mitigate some losses but if word got out that you never came and collected your stuff you'd get ransacked by word of mouth advertising that they can just screw you over.  What do you think they're worried about?  Their credit score?  They're renting basic household items, they're beyond that.

If you want effective collection, you need police involvement (same as the sheriff evicting someone).  You don't have to call every time you visit, but it needs to escalate to that level at some point.  You need to be able to TAKE THE OBJECTS BACK and there needs to be a system in place to do that that people are aware of.


Of course there is a legal means of getting the property back. It's called a court order.
2014-02-25 11:59:40 AM  
1 votes:
Furniture rentals are good for events, but not for long term.

Superbowl party? Rent an extra couch, a buffet table, and 2 bigscreens.

Need a couch? Go to a salvation army/used furniture place.


/mmm I can smell your sex on the cushions
2014-02-25 11:57:42 AM  
1 votes:

Riche: This "Tough Guy" collection approach doesn't make any sense to me.  It's only going to eventually get them sued for FAR more than the crap they're out.

Why risk a (probably) VERY profitable business model screwing over poor people by doing this?  They should just keep to the proper ways:

1.  Letters/Phone calls.
2.  A couple of POLITE visits-- maybe with a second guy carrying a video camera to document that they're being nonthreatening
3.  Either go to court or sell the account to a debt collector and claim the loss on your taxes.


=======================================


My guess is when there's a loss, the franchise owner gets a stick up his/her ass that they've been "stolen" from and that they have some kind of right to threaten to break some kneecaps to get "their" stuff back, while in the meantime forgetting their WHOLE FREAKING BUSINESS MODEL is morally no better than theft from the poor and stupid.

These franchise owners just need to chill out, count their money, snort some coke  off a hooker's ass, and generally enjoy the rest of their lives until they eventually die and get reincarnated as a dung beetle with MS. Or something worse.


I think you're out of touch with the ghetto.

1 - Poor people are so used to bill collectors that they don't react to phone calls and letters unless they have a windfall.  Literally, you have to shut the lights out or evict them.  Without the knowledge that things can go that far, you are powerless.

2 - This is reasonable, but I'm pretty sure unconsented video taping opens another legal can of worms.  Maybe not.

3 - If rental places lawyered up that all of the money goes to the lawyer.  It's just not really cost effective.  Selling to a collections agency would mitigate some losses but if word got out that you never came and collected your stuff you'd get ransacked by word of mouth advertising that they can just screw you over.  What do you think they're worried about?  Their credit score?  They're renting basic household items, they're beyond that.

If you want effective collection, you need police involvement (same as the sheriff evicting someone).  You don't have to call every time you visit, but it needs to escalate to that level at some point.  You need to be able to TAKE THE OBJECTS BACK and there needs to be a system in place to do that that people are aware of.
2014-02-25 11:57:02 AM  
1 votes:

TheManMythLegend: WTF Indeed: Here's a top tip; renting things like furniture and appliances always ends badly.

Renting is fine for like a party or something,  But yes loans for anything without a title are a very poor idea.


When I was on the road I used them a couple times to furnish apartments for long term assignments, it's cheaper than renting a furnished apartment.
2014-02-25 11:55:09 AM  
1 votes:
I like how they said that they weren't going to do things like pose as police officers. Um isn't that illlegal?
2014-02-25 11:48:51 AM  
1 votes:

mike_d85: redmid17: 1) Say "get off my property"

They don't own a sofa, WTF makes you think they own a house?

TFA called threatening prosecution "strong arm tactics".  Er... isn't that the legal path?


TFA said "threatening  arrest or criminal prosecution."

They cannot threaten that you will be arrested or prosecuted for a breach of contract. That IS a strong arm tactic. They have no legal recourse to have you arrested, especially if you are not their customer, AFAIK.
2014-02-25 11:48:40 AM  
1 votes:
Riche:  while in the meantime forgetting their WHOLE FREAKING BUSINESS MODEL is morally no better than theft from the poor and stupid.

It's only okay when THEY do it.

Usury used to be a crime.  I find it painfully ironic that the Bible-beating R-tards are usually the first ones to come out in full support of it nowadays.
2014-02-25 11:48:26 AM  
1 votes:
If you own money to a rent-to-own business pay them and or give the furniture back. That being said a friend was dealing with a electronics dealer here in Houston after he lost his job. He had only enough to pay his rent, utilities and food. This companies collections dept. were threatening to have him arrested and then they posed as deputies over the phone saying a warrant was issued. Crazy stuff.

Know your rights. Acknowledge that money is owed and to please mail me all the paperwork and then write them to "NEVER" contact you again. That is your right under the 'Fair Debt Collection Practices Act '

Failure to cease communication upon request: communicating with consumers in any way (other than litigation) after receiving written notice that said consumer wishes no further communication or refuses to pay the alleged debt, with certain exceptions, including advising that collection efforts are being terminated or that the collector intends to file a lawsuit or pursue other remedies where permitted[9]
2014-02-25 11:39:19 AM  
1 votes:
Back in the 90's I had an incident with Rent a Center. I had rented a house with two other guys and one day after about a month living there I come home one Saturday and the front door was all messed up. My roommates said that 3 guys saying they were from Rent a Center showed up looking for some lady, and when they told them that she didn't live there an argument broke out. That escalated to them demanding to be let into the house, and eventually to the 3 of them trying to push past my one roommate to get in. My other roommate grabbed a baseball bat and took a swing at the 3, but missed breaking the door frame. They said that made them back off and they guess somebody called the cops, because just then they showed up and made them leave.
2014-02-25 11:26:29 AM  
1 votes:
I can't believe she stood there for an hour talking to the guy.
No, you can't look around my house, goodbye, I'm calling 911 if you don't leave.
2014-02-25 11:20:49 AM  
1 votes:
I am almost less a fan of people who rent things to steal them as I am of people trying to force their way into people's homes without a warrant.

A simple solution would be to have a device that could brick the TV from the street. Or better yet, a small RFID tracking device that announces the item's presence to a reasonable radius, so nobody would have to go into the house. Either hide the device, or write it into the contract that if the device is removed from the rental item, the lessee is responsible for the replacement cost of the rental item.
2014-02-25 11:19:04 AM  
1 votes:
FTA: "If I hadn't stood my ground, (he) would have forced (his) way into my house," predicted Long

If she lived in Florida it would have ended quite diffrently if she "stood her ground."
2014-02-25 11:16:09 AM  
1 votes:
img.fark.net
2014-02-25 09:11:36 AM  
1 votes:

WTF Indeed: Here's a top tip; renting things like furniture and appliances always ends badly.


Right up there with payday loans.
 
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