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(Venture Beat)   30 year old language to be released soon. Maybe   (venturebeat.com) divider line 22
    More: Interesting, Raspberry Pi, Mathematica, Wolfram Alpha, VentureBeat, programming  
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2942 clicks; posted to Geek » on 25 Feb 2014 at 9:52 AM (43 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



22 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-02-25 09:57:11 AM  
Going to have to take a look at this. I'm skeptical of "everything languages", but Wolfram does have a track record of making things happen.
 
2014-02-25 10:01:10 AM  
finally a language for us 30 year olds
 
2014-02-25 10:31:54 AM  

jfarkinB: Going to have to take a look at this. I'm skeptical of "everything languages", but Wolfram does have a track record of making things happen.


Yeah, this is interesting... I can see it applied to some enterprise applications. Not sure this would be helpful in an embedded system, and not at all sure how they cram all this into a Raspberry Pi.

Relationally, it is kind of fascinating, and I have to wonder if we are now seeing the beginning of the core of AI. Wolfram seems to have figured out some fundamental things about parsing "knowledge queries" - given the decades of experience with mathematical modeling, it's not surprising. Tying into larger informational networks could make this pretty powerful.
 
2014-02-25 11:04:29 AM  
So is this what will awaken Skynet?
 
2014-02-25 11:12:23 AM  
FORTRAN 8x? Can't wait as FORTRAN IV is getting a little long in the tooth and only heretics use FORTRAN 77

/first job out of college was reviving old Fortran programs
//
 
2014-02-25 11:27:13 AM  

Valiente: So is this what will awaken Skynet?



Damn skippy, and it's about time. August 12, 1997 came and went over a decade ago. We are WAY behind schedule.
 
2014-02-25 11:46:39 AM  

Cheron: FORTRAN 8x? Can't wait as FORTRAN IV is getting a little long in the tooth and only heretics use FORTRAN 77

/first job out of college was reviving old Fortran programs
//


You're partially kidding, but apparently FORTRAN, now known as Fortran, is still around according to the wiki.

And, this Wolfram Language does seem to be interesting.
 
2014-02-25 12:09:30 PM  
Wolfram Alpha uses part of this from what I can tell.
And it is pretty awesome.
 
2014-02-25 12:10:45 PM  
Take a card. You can turn it onto a horse. Now go riding that horse. In space. Except now the horse is a boat and you have thousands of them in formation spelling out your facebook friends list. In greek. Symbolically. Actually everything is a symbol. And a function. And now interfaces, graphics objects, graphs, and more, programmatically.

All with a metro interface.
 
2014-02-25 12:52:56 PM  
Lots of everything built in? Sounds like Smalltalk.
 
2014-02-25 01:53:54 PM  

yakmans_dad: Lots of everything built in? Sounds like Smalltalk.


Smalltalk with a rabid, rich creator keeping the dream alive with large amounts of money.
Kind of like steve jobs did with apple.
 
2014-02-25 02:51:40 PM  

47 is the new 42: You're partially kidding, but apparently FORTRAN, now known as Fortran, is still around


Many of the old languages are.  COBOL is slated for an update this year.  Lisp lives on as Clojure, FORTH heavily influenced REBOL and BASIC has dozens of forks.  And the GNU Project still actively develops compilers for many of these old languages under the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC).
 
2014-02-25 06:36:44 PM  
So finally we get to the Wolfram Beta

www.wolframalpha.com
 
2014-02-25 07:38:27 PM  
The video claims that the Wolfram language has the best known algorithm for solving the travelling salesman problem, but in the image at 3:27 in the video, the plotted route includes a link from Iceland to Portugal, while excluding the obviously shorter route from Greece to Austria which was the alternative way of completing the route.
 
2014-02-25 09:26:38 PM  

BarryJV: The video claims that the Wolfram language has the best known algorithm for solving the travelling salesman problem, but in the image at 3:27 in the video, the plotted route includes a link from Iceland to Portugal, while excluding the obviously shorter route from Greece to Austria which was the alternative way of completing the route.


They also boast the best algorithm for farking with people with OCD.
 
2014-02-25 11:04:49 PM  

BarryJV: The video claims that the Wolfram language has the best known algorithm for solving the travelling salesman problem, but in the image at 3:27 in the video, the plotted route includes a link from Iceland to Portugal, while excluding the obviously shorter route from Greece to Austria which was the alternative way of completing the route.


you are either: an idiot, a troll, an ignorant fool or all of the above.

the route is a graph. it doesnt repeat a city
you have to LEAVE iceland once you get there, torshavn, iceland, portugal

greece and austria could be connected, creating a giant loop.

and best known, does not equal perfect solution to an unsolvable problem, although this small subset may be the optimal solution.

so what was your point again?

try google traveling salesman problem and then comeback
oooo oooo oooo
better yet, comb back with a solution which beats the wolfram solution by 10% total distance traveled

thanks
we'll wait here
 
2014-02-25 11:40:55 PM  

dready zim: Take a card. You can turn it onto a horse. Now go riding that horse. In space. Except now the horse is a boat and you have thousands of them in formation spelling out your facebook friends list. In greek. Symbolically. Actually everything is a symbol. And a function. And now interfaces, graphics objects, graphs, and more, programmatically.

All with a metro interface.


www.powerlineblog.com
 
2014-02-26 12:39:46 AM  

namatad: BarryJV: The video claims that the Wolfram language has the best known algorithm for solving the travelling salesman problem, but in the image at 3:27 in the video, the plotted route includes a link from Iceland to Portugal, while excluding the obviously shorter route from Greece to Austria which was the alternative way of completing the route.

you are either: an idiot, a troll, an ignorant fool or all of the above.

the route is a graph. it doesnt repeat a city
you have to LEAVE iceland once you get there, torshavn, iceland, portugal

greece and austria could be connected, creating a giant loop.

and best known, does not equal perfect solution to an unsolvable problem, although this small subset may be the optimal solution.

so what was your point again?

try google traveling salesman problem and then comeback
oooo oooo oooo
better yet, comb back with a solution which beats the wolfram solution by 10% total distance traveled

thanks
we'll wait here


His point is that if you remove the Lisbon - Reykjavik link and add an Athens - Vienna link you *still* have a tour of the European capitols -- one that removes more than a thousand miles from the total length of the tour. The updated path would have you starting (or ending, if you prefer) at Reykjavik and ending (or starting) at Lisbon.

If you had bothered looking at the map in the video this would be obvious, but apparently taking a few seconds to do so before shiatting out this idiotic reply is too much work for you.
 
2014-02-26 01:37:17 AM  

Clipsy: namatad: BarryJV: The video claims that the Wolfram language has the best known algorithm for solving the travelling salesman problem, but in the image at 3:27 in the video, the plotted route includes a link from Iceland to Portugal, while excluding the obviously shorter route from Greece to Austria which was the alternative way of completing the route.

you are either: an idiot, a troll, an ignorant fool or all of the above.

the route is a graph. it doesnt repeat a city
you have to LEAVE iceland once you get there, torshavn, iceland, portugal

greece and austria could be connected, creating a giant loop.

and best known, does not equal perfect solution to an unsolvable problem, although this small subset may be the optimal solution.

so what was your point again?

try google traveling salesman problem and then comeback
oooo oooo oooo
better yet, comb back with a solution which beats the wolfram solution by 10% total distance traveled

thanks
we'll wait here

His point is that if you remove the Lisbon - Reykjavik link and add an Athens - Vienna link you *still* have a tour of the European capitols -- one that removes more than a thousand miles from the total length of the tour. The updated path would have you starting (or ending, if you prefer) at Reykjavik and ending (or starting) at Lisbon.

If you had bothered looking at the map in the video this would be obvious, but apparently taking a few seconds to do so before shiatting out this idiotic reply is too much work for you.


LOL
LOL
"Given a list of cities and the distances between each pair of cities, what is the shortest possible route that visits each city exactly once and returns to the origin city? "

FFS
HOW HARD IS IT to google shiat?

WHAT's missing is the link between Athens and Vienna.
Completing the traveling salesman problem.

both of your replies are still wrong.
but go ahead and tell me about the salesman that never returns home.
 
2014-02-26 09:00:32 AM  
namatad:
but go ahead and tell me about the salesman that never returns home.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S7Jw_v3F_Q0
 
2014-02-26 02:49:19 PM  

namatad: you are either: an idiot, a troll, an ignorant fool or all of the above.


OK, I think you might need a Snickers:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uii3VhELiuE

the route is a graph. it doesnt repeat a city
you have to LEAVE iceland once you get there, torshavn, iceland, portugal

greece and austria could be connected, creating a giant loop.


Greece and Austria COULD be connected making a loop, but they're not. This suggests the solution is intended for those starting at an external point.

e.g. If I was flying from the US to Europe and wanted to visit all the capitals, the shortest route starts and ends at my home airport, I need an open loop of the rest of the points on the net to show me where to start and end my trip. That would be a useful bit of information when choosing which US airport to fly from and would explain why the output of the function is an open loop.

By leaving the loop open, the solution looks like it's suggesting an external start point. In which case, it's clearly wrong. If the solution assumes you are starting in one of the capitals, why not close the loop? That would be usual for the typical Travelling Salesman problem.
 
2014-02-26 02:53:17 PM  

yakmans_dad: They also boast the best algorithm for farking with people with OCD.


Was that in the video? I can't find it, I watched it like a hundred times and I just can't see that quote anywhere.
 
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