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(Mother Nature Network)   What playing the hardest Super Mario level can teach us about quantum mechanics. After reading that, one thing is certain, you're going to need more mushrooms   (mnn.com) divider line 22
    More: Interesting, mario, quantum physics, Super Mario World, possible worlds, old quantum theory  
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3372 clicks; posted to Geek » on 24 Feb 2014 at 8:17 AM (26 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



22 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-02-24 08:25:08 AM
"admit?"
 
2014-02-24 08:25:47 AM
What is Kaizo Mario World?
 
2014-02-24 08:31:55 AM
The universe has an unlimited lives cheat?
 
2014-02-24 08:34:26 AM
So basically they did with a fan-made SMW level the same thing that Super Meat Boy does with every single level you play.

Still neat though.
 
2014-02-24 08:54:24 AM

stuhayes2010: What is Kaizo Mario World?


It's a 'hacked' bootleg cartridge with an insane difficulty level.  I own two copies but only because the first one was DOA when I bought it on e-bay.  I ended up to getting a Taiwanese friend to pick it up for me on one of his trips home to visit his family.  You can emulate it too but whats the fun in that?
 
2014-02-24 09:01:00 AM
That's not multiple play throughs. That's one play through, starting over at each rest point.
 
2014-02-24 09:05:53 AM
I beat that game!

fark the hang on a rope path level.

And the last room in the final castle
 
2014-02-24 09:46:06 AM
Eh, fan-made levels don't really count, since they can be made as hard (or impossible) as one wants.

The hardest official Mario level I've played is I think "The Perfect Run" in the Grandmaster Galaxy in Super Mario Galaxy 2.

It's a long level and you can't make a single mistake.  Took me well over one hundred tried before I finally beat that one.
 
2014-02-24 10:03:44 AM
Didn't know quantum mechanic uses save states like a little biatch.

/Could've just beaten a level of Super Meatboy and get the same results.
 
2014-02-24 10:08:16 AM
FTA "You just have to hope, for the sake of your many-worlds self, that the real world has better odds of survival than Kaizo Mario World does."


Not really. Death is around every corner, and you're still gonna die.
 
2014-02-24 10:10:54 AM
I've kind of wondered if Twitch Plays Pokemon has any application in the study of biological evolution.  You have 50,000 people spamming pseudo-random commands on a 20-second delay.  And yet despite all that, after 10 straight days of playing they've managed to progress at least halfway through the game so far.
 
2014-02-24 10:30:29 AM

InterruptingQuirk: FTA "You just have to hope, for the sake of your many-worlds self, that the real world has better odds of survival than Kaizo Mario World does."


Not really. Death is around every corner, and you're still gonna die.


Booker's gotta take that baptism, or all the worlds crumble
 
2014-02-24 10:31:58 AM
Next up: A detailed treatise smashing Adam Smith using Final Fantasy.
 
2014-02-24 11:13:07 AM

Fano: InterruptingQuirk: FTA "You just have to hope, for the sake of your many-worlds self, that the real world has better odds of survival than Kaizo Mario World does."


Not really. Death is around every corner, and you're still gonna die.

Booker's gotta take that baptism, or all the worlds crumble


I did not see that coming.
 
2014-02-24 11:55:22 AM

Fano: InterruptingQuirk: FTA "You just have to hope, for the sake of your many-worlds self, that the real world has better odds of survival than Kaizo Mario World does."


Not really. Death is around every corner, and you're still gonna die.

Booker's gotta take that baptism, or all the worlds crumble


Not really. He could have just missed out on Wounded Knee.
 
2014-02-24 01:00:25 PM

Fast Moon: I've kind of wondered if Twitch Plays Pokemon has any application in the study of biological evolution.  You have 50,000 people spamming pseudo-random commands on a 20-second delay.  And yet despite all that, after 10 straight days of playing they've managed to progress at least halfway through the game so far.


Theoretically speaking for any given console game there is a collection of sets of commands (button presses/durations) that combine to solve the level.   Any number of algorithms can seek out those solutions (this looks like it may be the outcome of such an algorithm).

There was an article some time ago about someone who wrote some software to try to do exactly that with the Mario game from Mario/Duckhunt on SNES.  It was able to find bugs and quirks in game play and solve the first level pretty well.  If I recall the second level had lots of problems with dead end solutions where the algorithm got stuck in a corner and couldn't find a 'better' path from where it had ended up.

But yeah, "random" button pressing with some knowledge about what has worked previously is a perfectly legitimate solve strategy.  The big questions come out when the game is non-deterministic (meaning it has random elements).  Those are harder to deal with.
 
2014-02-24 02:27:28 PM
Farkin' Tubular.

/amirite.
 
2014-02-24 08:03:57 PM

bill4935: Farkin' Tubular.

/amirite.


I hated Tubular.  You needed precise timing on that level.  Took me nearly twenty tries using the balloon to beat it.
The timing for the spikes in the last section of the Fortress in Bowser Valley...it seemed like forever to just get everything right.
 
2014-02-24 08:59:57 PM
This one's harder

Well, okay, the actual gameplay might be simple, but programming that thing had to have been a biatch.
 
2014-02-24 11:41:49 PM

stuhayes2010: What is Kaizo Mario World?


From the third paragraph of TFA:  back in 2007 a Japanese youth hacked a version of Nintendo's Super Mario World, creating one of the world's first ultra-hard (i.e., near impossible) Super Mario hacks to go viral. Called "Kaizo Mario World," the hacked version of the classic game is filled with seemingly impracticable obstacles. Invisible blocks appear in inconvenient spots to impede jumps, time limits are shortened, and enemies are numerous and intractably placed.

 /reading is hard
 
2014-02-25 12:07:29 AM
There's the daredevil runs on Super Mario Galaxy, one or 2 of those are farking crazy.

However, if none of you ever played Donkey Kong Country Returns, and played the level where you ride a rocket barrel while a giant laser shooting bat is chasing you, then you don't know what a difficult level looks like.

I was so thoroughly disgusted with that level, I nearly slammed the controller a few times in massive frustration.

Oh, and the temple levels are very hard, too.
 
2014-02-25 01:09:42 AM
It seems an odd way to express sum over histories. It's only the first half of "everything happens" which is hard to accept if you aren't given the selection criteria for which histories demonstrate results, which Mario example apart from "mario lives" which is a selection criterion without good analogy in QM.

One can approach this as a "this is the result, how did it happen?" which is usually more tractable than "this is the state, what can happen and how much?" In the Mario example the desired "win" state has several such histories (finite time step, limited time, and a finite number of commands multiplies to a large but finite number). Where this isn't much like QM is that the individual histories don't interfere with one another. The result is a rather plain description that lacks much QM-ness and instead of more of a monkeys at typewriters situation.
 
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