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(Chicago Trib)   Northwestern University football coach testifies for the team's efforts to unionize, saying the school stresses academics first. Which is what every coach says who has a team that went 5-7   (articles.chicagotribune.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, Northwestern University, football team, Pat Fitzgerald  
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361 clicks; posted to Sports » on 24 Feb 2014 at 8:40 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-02-24 08:46:09 AM  
Fitzgerald could go 1-11 and keep that job.
 
2014-02-24 08:51:40 AM  
If they stress academics, then why does the football team budget make the math budget look like chicken feed?
 
2014-02-24 08:54:12 AM  
"I'm looking, probably like every coach, to do whatever is right best for our student-athletes, whatever gives them the opportunity to have the best experience possible while they're going through the full-time job by being a student-athlete," Fitzgerald was quoted by the Sun-Times


That's awesome
 
2014-02-24 08:56:59 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: If they stress academics, then why does the football team budget make the math budget look like chicken feed?


Because it costs more to fund it?  What kind of dumb question is that?
 
2014-02-24 08:57:12 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: If they stress academics, then why does the football team budget make the math budget look like chicken feed?


2011 Northwestern football spent $15,733,548 and had revenues of $22,704,959. That's why.

/Go Wildcats
 
2014-02-24 09:09:23 AM  

Agatha Crispy: Marcus Aurelius: If they stress academics, then why does the football team budget make the math budget look like chicken feed?

2011 Northwestern football spent $15,733,548 and had revenues of $22,704,959. That's why.

/Go Wildcats


So it looks like this is all about math after all.
 
2014-02-24 09:17:36 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: Agatha Crispy: Marcus Aurelius: If they stress academics, then why does the football team budget make the math budget look like chicken feed?

2011 Northwestern football spent $15,733,548 and had revenues of $22,704,959. That's why.

/Go Wildcats

So it looks like this is all about math after all.


Northwestern's College of Arts and Sciences received endowments alone in that same year equivalent to what the football team spent.  What was your point?
 
2014-02-24 09:20:20 AM  

kwame: Marcus Aurelius: Agatha Crispy: Marcus Aurelius: If they stress academics, then why does the football team budget make the math budget look like chicken feed?

2011 Northwestern football spent $15,733,548 and had revenues of $22,704,959. That's why.

/Go Wildcats

So it looks like this is all about math after all.

Northwestern's College of Arts and Sciences received endowments alone in that same year equivalent to what the football team spent.  What was your point?


You think he has a point?
 
2014-02-24 09:23:20 AM  

kwame: Marcus Aurelius: Agatha Crispy: Marcus Aurelius: If they stress academics, then why does the football team budget make the math budget look like chicken feed?

2011 Northwestern football spent $15,733,548 and had revenues of $22,704,959. That's why.

/Go Wildcats

So it looks like this is all about math after all.

Northwestern's College of Arts and Sciences received endowments alone in that same year equivalent to what the football team spent.  What was your point?


Football is not an academic activity.

You do understand that, yes?
 
2014-02-24 09:25:49 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: Football is not an academic activity.

You do understand that, yes?


It gives a lot of kids who wouldn't otherwise have the opportunity at a college education and high level networking the chance at such things.
 
2014-02-24 09:27:26 AM  

skybreaker: Marcus Aurelius: Football is not an academic activity.

You do understand that, yes?

It gives a lot of kids who wouldn't otherwise have the opportunity at a college education and high level networking the chance at such things.


It works for the ones that are good at sports.  No so much for the ones that are good with their minds.
 
2014-02-24 09:29:40 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: skybreaker: Marcus Aurelius: Football is not an academic activity.

You do understand that, yes?

It gives a lot of kids who wouldn't otherwise have the opportunity at a college education and high level networking the chance at such things.

It works for the ones that are good at sports.  No so much for the ones that are good with their minds.


Yes, football works for those that are good at sports. What's your point? Are you saying the Humanities Department should be allowed to field a football team?
 
2014-02-24 09:30:46 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: Football is not an academic activity.

You do understand that, yes?


You'll probably need to explain that to all the communications, public relations, kinesiology, physical therapy, music, etc. undergraduates who get experience through the football program.  I'll leave the graduate students out until you're done explaining that to them.
 
2014-02-24 09:32:45 AM  

Agatha Crispy: Marcus Aurelius: skybreaker: Marcus Aurelius: Football is not an academic activity.

You do understand that, yes?

It gives a lot of kids who wouldn't otherwise have the opportunity at a college education and high level networking the chance at such things.

It works for the ones that are good at sports.  No so much for the ones that are good with their minds.

Yes, football works for those that are good at sports. What's your point? Are you saying the Humanities Department should be allowed to field a football team?


I'll translate.

"I have so little experience with college football that I am unaware of the thousands of football players who earn not only undergraduate but often graduate degrees and go on to lead productive non-football lives thanks to their scholarship."
 
2014-02-24 09:34:52 AM  

kwame: Agatha Crispy: Marcus Aurelius: skybreaker: Marcus Aurelius: Football is not an academic activity.

You do understand that, yes?

It gives a lot of kids who wouldn't otherwise have the opportunity at a college education and high level networking the chance at such things.

It works for the ones that are good at sports.  No so much for the ones that are good with their minds.

Yes, football works for those that are good at sports. What's your point? Are you saying the Humanities Department should be allowed to field a football team?

I'll translate.

"I have so little experience with college football that I am unaware of the thousands of football players who earn not only undergraduate but often graduate degrees and go on to lead productive non-football lives thanks to their scholarship."


A actually attended Northwestern on a sports scholarship and obtained a graduate degree from there too. Amazing, isn't it?

/Go Wildcats
 
2014-02-24 09:36:03 AM  

kwame: "I have so little experience with college football that I am unaware of the thousands of football players who earn not only undergraduate but often graduate degrees and go on to lead productive non-football lives thanks to their scholarship."


What? Next you'll tell me that Rhodes scholars come out of football too!
 
2014-02-24 10:26:03 AM  

Agatha Crispy: Marcus Aurelius: skybreaker: Marcus Aurelius: Football is not an academic activity.

You do understand that, yes?

It gives a lot of kids who wouldn't otherwise have the opportunity at a college education and high level networking the chance at such things.

It works for the ones that are good at sports.  No so much for the ones that are good with their minds.

Yes, football works for those that are good at sports. What's your point? Are you saying the Humanities Department should be allowed to field a football team?


Well, the Philosophy department fields a mean soccer team
 
2014-02-24 10:48:04 AM  
Well, the Philosophy department fields a mean soccer team

They sure do!
 
2014-02-24 11:01:04 AM  
"That's what their parents have entrusted me to do"

I thought they were adults.
 
2014-02-24 11:09:01 AM  

kwame: Agatha Crispy: Marcus Aurelius: skybreaker: Marcus Aurelius: Football is not an academic activity.

You do understand that, yes?

It gives a lot of kids who wouldn't otherwise have the opportunity at a college education and high level networking the chance at such things.

It works for the ones that are good at sports.  No so much for the ones that are good with their minds.

Yes, football works for those that are good at sports. What's your point? Are you saying the Humanities Department should be allowed to field a football team?

I'll translate.

"I have so little experience with college football that I am unaware of the thousands of football players who earn not only undergraduate but often graduate degrees and go on to lead productive non-football lives thanks to their scholarship."


Are you sure? I thought it was more along the lines of "Dig my threadshiat."
 
2014-02-24 11:18:18 AM  
Wait, we're making fun of Northwestern's academics now?
 
2014-02-24 11:43:51 AM  

dragonchild: Wait, we're making fun of Northwestern's academics now?


I think we either want their math department budget to be $10 million a year, or we want the football team to fund itself with bake sales.
 
2014-02-24 11:45:30 AM  
The football team is trying to be recognized as a union in an effort to gain a series of new rights, including financial coverage for sports-related medical expenses

They already get financial coverage for sports-related medical expenses.

Quarterback Kain Colter earlier in the week stressed that participating in football at NU was a job, adding he switched to a less-demanding major so it would interfere less with football.
 
I'm having a difficult time giving a shiat.  What are you hoping to do for the rest of your life?  Is it football related, such as coaching or trying for the NFL?  If so, then who gives a shiat about your degree?  If not, if you switched your major for a game you'll play for a few years, you're an idiot.
 
2014-02-24 11:53:30 AM  

lennavan: They already get financial coverage for sports-related medical expenses.


No, they don't. Any coverage is at the goodwill of the university, not contractually mandated, and it doesn't extend past your playing days even though injuries may persist
 
2014-02-24 11:58:45 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: If they stress academics, then why does the football team budget make the math budget look like chicken feed?


Northwestern has an Annual budget of $1.6 Billion.  Just keep that in mind while you try your very best to argue Northwestern University favors athletics.
 
2014-02-24 12:01:27 PM  

Lost Thought 00: lennavan: They already get financial coverage for sports-related medical expenses.

No, they don't. Any coverage is at the goodwill of the university, not contractually mandated, and it doesn't extend past your playing days even though injuries may persist


Yes they do.  It's not "the goodwill of the University."  Yes, it does extend past your playing days, all you have to do is prove it was related to an injury you sustained during your time playing sports.

But the rest of what you wrote is correct.
 
2014-02-24 12:17:36 PM  

lennavan: all you have to do is prove it was related to an injury you sustained during your time playing sports.


Considering how unbelievably shady NFL teams are at shielding themselves from potential liability when it comes to this kind of thing, I am curious just how honorable colleges are in this regard.
 
2014-02-24 12:26:29 PM  

Killer Cars: lennavan: all you have to do is prove it was related to an injury you sustained during your time playing sports.

Considering how unbelievably shady NFL teams are at shielding themselves from potential liability when it comes to this kind of thing, I am curious just how honorable colleges are in this regard.


It's kind of difficult to prove memory loss at age 50 was caused by a concussion 30 years prior. Not so tough when you are experiencing issues when it happened. I blew out my knee when I was a senior and I received care and therapy even after I left school.
 
2014-02-24 12:30:30 PM  

lennavan: Lost Thought 00: lennavan: They already get financial coverage for sports-related medical expenses.

No, they don't. Any coverage is at the goodwill of the university, not contractually mandated, and it doesn't extend past your playing days even though injuries may persist

Yes they do.  It's not "the goodwill of the University."  Yes, it does extend past your playing days, all you have to do is prove it was related to an injury you sustained during your time playing sports.

But the rest of what you wrote is correct.


Citation, because everything I ever heard was that the school didn't have to provide care or aftercare for injuries. For eample when the player from Loisville broke his leg in half, the school paid for his surgery and after care, but they made it clear that they weren't obligated to do so.
 
2014-02-24 12:48:30 PM  

Agatha Crispy: It's kind of difficult to prove memory loss at age 50 was caused by a concussion 30 years prior.


True, but I've read accounts from the professional ranks where especially the fringe, minimum-salary players experience shoddy medical reporting from team trainers and overly-aggressive rehabilitation measures and by the time they've retired and want to fix a muscle tear here and a bone spur there that were never fully taken care of completely, they contact the teams they play for and get the runaround since, magically, neither team has to actually take responsibility with what's on record. Doesn't happen to everyone, but naivety and just "saying whatever needs to be said to get back on the field and keep my job" will fark you over in the end in that realm.

I can certainly see a collegiate-athlete who isn't a star on his or her team and always feeling they need to show up everyday to keep their place can also find themselves in a similar position later on if they fail to be up front and get everything documented.
 
2014-02-24 01:05:21 PM  

ongbok: Citation, because everything I ever heard was that the school didn't have to provide care or aftercare for injuries. For eample when the player from Loisville


My original comment was in response to a quote from a football player at Northwestern.  I meant the context to mean Northwestern.  My citation is I know a girl who was scholarship soccer player at NU that had surgery years after graduating paid for by NU because the doctor agreed it was an ongoing injury sustained when she was playing there.

ongbok: For eample when the player from Loisville broke his leg in half, the school paid for his surgery and after care, but they made it clear that they weren't obligated to do so.


Depends on the agreement he had with the University.
 
2014-02-24 01:12:03 PM  

lennavan: ongbok: Citation, because everything I ever heard was that the school didn't have to provide care or aftercare for injuries. For eample when the player from Loisville

My original comment was in response to a quote from a football player at Northwestern.  I meant the context to mean Northwestern.  My citation is I know a girl who was scholarship soccer player at NU that had surgery years after graduating paid for by NU because the doctor agreed it was an ongoing injury sustained when she was playing there.

ongbok: For eample when the player from Loisville broke his leg in half, the school paid for his surgery and after care, but they made it clear that they weren't obligated to do so.

Depends on the agreement he had with the University.


It depends on the school, the NCAA doesn't mandate that the school provide healthcare for the athletes. That is what they are fighting for, along with due process for rule violations and other things.
 
2014-02-24 01:13:15 PM  

lennavan: My original comment was in response to a quote from a football player at Northwestern. I meant the context to mean Northwestern. My citation is I know a girl who was scholarship soccer player at NU that had surgery years after graduating paid for by NU because the doctor agreed it was an ongoing injury sustained when she was playing there.


NCAA regulations require athletes to carry medical insurance and the NCAA provides a catastrophic injury policy through Mutual of Omaha.  Most major program schools provide that insurance.  Students are not covered by that insurance once they are no longer enrolled, although there are cases that the school opts to help with expenses if the injury was a result of play as a student-athlete.
 
2014-02-24 02:19:18 PM  

kwame: lennavan: My original comment was in response to a quote from a football player at Northwestern. I meant the context to mean Northwestern. My citation is I know a girl who was scholarship soccer player at NU that had surgery years after graduating paid for by NU because the doctor agreed it was an ongoing injury sustained when she was playing there.

NCAA regulations require athletes to carry medical insurance and the NCAA provides a catastrophic injury policy through Mutual of Omaha.  Most major program schools provide that insurance.  Students are not covered by that insurance once they are no longer enrolled, although there are cases that the school opts to help with expenses if the injury was a result of play as a student-athlete.


At Northwestern those things are true.  I have no idea what other Universities do.
 
2014-02-24 02:23:03 PM  

lennavan: My original comment was in response to a quote from a football player at Northwestern. I meant the context to mean Northwestern. My citation is I know a girl who was scholarship soccer player at NU that had surgery years after graduating paid for by NU because the doctor agreed it was an ongoing injury sustained when she was playing there.


I think people are getting confused because these NU players are fighting for something they don't actually need.  I would expect NU to be better than most at taking care of their student-athletes, so why unionize?  Because athletes at other schools don't have it so good, and many happen to play in particularly anti-union states.  These guys are smart enough to understand the concept of legal precedent; the implications of a court ruling spread pretty quickly..  They are in a position to do some good and taking that chance.

I understand it's confusing the hell out of Farkers because people here are incapable of comprehending even the mere idea of doing something to benefit other people.  Around here, altruism is really the wolf of long-term selfishness in sheep's clothing, or perhaps a pathetic fictional flaw good for getting minor characters killed off in an GeorgeArrrgghhMartin novel.
 
2014-02-24 02:50:53 PM  

lennavan: ongbok: Citation, because everything I ever heard was that the school didn't have to provide care or aftercare for injuries. For eample when the player from Loisville

My original comment was in response to a quote from a football player at Northwestern.  I meant the context to mean Northwestern.  My citation is I know a girl who was scholarship soccer player at NU that had surgery years after graduating paid for by NU because the doctor agreed it was an ongoing injury sustained when she was playing there.


This is not an obligation of NU. It is them being a responsible university partner. At any time they can discontinue this benefit. It is very necessary to create a contractual/statutory requirement that these benefit be provided on a go forward basis.
 
2014-02-24 02:52:08 PM  

Agatha Crispy: kwame: Agatha Crispy: Marcus Aurelius: skybreaker: Marcus Aurelius: Football is not an academic activity.

You do understand that, yes?

It gives a lot of kids who wouldn't otherwise have the opportunity at a college education and high level networking the chance at such things.

It works for the ones that are good at sports.  No so much for the ones that are good with their minds.

Yes, football works for those that are good at sports. What's your point? Are you saying the Humanities Department should be allowed to field a football team?

I'll translate.

"I have so little experience with college football that I am unaware of the thousands of football players who earn not only undergraduate but often graduate degrees and go on to lead productive non-football lives thanks to their scholarship."

A actually attended Northwestern on a sports scholarship and obtained a graduate degree from there too. Amazing, isn't it?

/Go Wildcats


I was the co-captain of the intramural flag-football team of the Graduate Advertising program (the "Madison Avenue Monsters") in 1987.

/go 'cats!
 
2014-02-24 02:53:14 PM  

dragonchild: I understand it's confusing the hell out of Farkers because people here are incapable of comprehending even the mere idea of doing something to benefit other people.


That's fine except it's a completely arguable point that a) a union would benefit anyone and b) that if it did, it's fair to the rest of the student body that athletes get it.
 
2014-02-24 02:55:43 PM  

Moopy Mac: It is very necessary to create a contractual/statutory requirement that these benefit be provided on a go forward basis.


What benefits are there that aren't already provided by the required medical insurance?
 
2014-02-24 03:05:38 PM  

Moopy Mac: This is not an obligation of NU. It is them being a responsible university partner. At any time they can discontinue this benefit.


And?  It is not an obligation to attend college, it is not an obligation to attend NU and it is not an obligation to play sports at NU.  At any time, they can quit the team.

Moopy Mac: It is very necessary to create a contractual/statutory requirement that these benefit be provided on a go forward basis.


I certainly see how it would be very beneficial to student-athletes but I don't see how it's necessary.
 
2014-02-24 03:14:42 PM  

lennavan: Moopy Mac: This is not an obligation of NU. It is them being a responsible university partner. At any time they can discontinue this benefit.

And?  It is not an obligation to attend college, it is not an obligation to attend NU and it is not an obligation to play sports at NU.  At any time, they can quit the team.

So... "if you don't want to risk being a brain-damaged gimp with no legal recourse later in life, just go to community college and forget the football scholarship."

Is that a reasonable nutshell version of your position on this?
 
2014-02-24 03:18:03 PM  
Preview, dammit. Should read like this:

 lennavan: Moopy Mac: This is not an obligation of NU. It is them being a responsible university partner. At any time they can discontinue this benefit.

And?  It is not an obligation to attend college, it is not an obligation to attend NU and it is not an obligation to play sports at NU.  At any time, they can quit the team.


So... "if you don't want to risk being a brain-damaged gimp with no legal recourse later in life, just go to community college and forget the football scholarship." Is that a reasonable nutshell version of your position on this?
 
2014-02-24 03:30:33 PM  

DrBenway: Preview, dammit. Should read like this:

 lennavan: Moopy Mac: This is not an obligation of NU. It is them being a responsible university partner. At any time they can discontinue this benefit.

And?  It is not an obligation to attend college, it is not an obligation to attend NU and it is not an obligation to play sports at NU.  At any time, they can quit the team.

So... "if you don't want to risk being a brain-damaged gimp with no legal recourse later in life, just go to community college and forget the football scholarship." Is that a reasonable nutshell version of your position on this?


I would have summarized it more as "if you don't want the risks associated with the football scholarship, you'll have to forgo the rewards of the football scholarship."  You know, like pretty much everyone else who isn't good at football does?

Is "derp" a reasonable nutshell version of your post?
 
2014-02-24 03:44:03 PM  

lennavan: I would have summarized it more as "if you don't want the risks associated with the football scholarship, you'll have to forgo the rewards of the football scholarship." You know, like pretty much everyone else who isn't good at football does?

Is "derp" a reasonable nutshell version of your post?


So then what's your position on a low income first generation student who will be able to attend a university only if he can play?  He's just SOL should have tried harder in school?
 
2014-02-24 03:51:14 PM  

kwame: So then what's your position on a low income first generation student who will be able to attend a university only if he can play? He's just SOL should have tried harder in school?


Uh, yeah, actually it is.  Let me ask you a question:

So then what's your position on a low income first generation student who won't be able to attend a university because he can't play?  He's just SOL should have tried harder at sports?

Because that's what you're saying.  If two people show up to Northwestern University and both need financial help, you want to give the kid who can play football a free ride while telling the other kid to go fark himself.
 
2014-02-24 04:00:13 PM  

lennavan: kwame: So then what's your position on a low income first generation student who will be able to attend a university only if he can play? He's just SOL should have tried harder in school?

Uh, yeah, actually it is.  Let me ask you a question:

So then what's your position on a low income first generation student who won't be able to attend a university because he can't play?  He's just SOL should have tried harder at sports?

Because that's what you're saying.  If two people show up to Northwestern University and both need financial help, you want to give the kid who can play football a free ride while telling the other kid to go fark himself.


If I had had this extra bit to factor in, yeah, I can see how "derp" would have been a more concise translation. I wasted too many words apparently. Wait... "bootstrappy derp" -- much better.
 
2014-02-24 04:19:25 PM  

lennavan: Moopy Mac: This is not an obligation of NU. It is them being a responsible university partner. At any time they can discontinue this benefit.

And?  It is not an obligation to attend college, it is not an obligation to attend NU and it is not an obligation to play sports at NU.  At any time, they can quit the team.


Just like the autoworker can stop building cars, or the letter carrier can stop delivering mail.

I'm going to try very hard to keep the money side out of this argument completely, so let's just focus on the imbalance of power here. A college football player applies for and is awarded a job as a member of his college's football team. By joining this team, he has certain duties and responsibilities, as well as certain rewards. His duties and responsibilities are put in place by the coach of the team, the athletic director of the university, the university as a whole, by the conference to which his university belongs, and by the NCAA at the top. Any of these organizations are free to impose additional duties and responsibilities on him, while also setting, limiting, managing, and modifying his benefits. His failure to comply with any of those duties and responsibilities results in the termination of all of his benefits, without recourse whatsoever. He has no input on how those duties and responsibilities are imposed, nor can he fight for better rewards for his talents. If he finds alternate means of monetizing his ability, he is barred forever from continuing in college football. If he has a skill - playing football at a high level - he is forced into a monopolistic labor market where he has absolutely no power whatsoever.

Now wait a minute, you're saying, this is the same as at millions of other jobs in the country. A Walmart employee has just as little input into compensation, schedule, duties, and responsibilities as the college football player, right? Except that's not the case. The Walmart employee has the protection of the National Labor Relations Board. The Walmart employee has federal minimum wage laws. The Walmart employee could, if such a thing existed, take a second job talking about how awesome he is because he works for Walmart and receive a paycheck for that. The Walmart employee could, if he tried really hard and managed to avoid the anti-union shiatheads at corporate, (and if they kept his store open) actually form a union. The Walmart employee can win multi-million dollar lawsuits for forced overtime, being locked in to the store at night, anti-labor retaliation, and unfair compensation. The football player can must play, or he can be kicked out.

Forget all about the money. Forget about TV deals, video game deals, merchandise deals, compensation for coaches, quarter-billion dollar plus stadiums, corporate sponsorship, bowl games, ticket revenue, and the price of a hot dog on a Saturday. These players are being controlled in every aspect of their life - from the time they wake up to the time they go to sleep, for four (or more) years - and they have exactly no say in any part of it whatsoever. They're not allowed to challenge unfair rules or demand fair compensation. They can't appeal administrative decisions or demand further rights. Everything they receive is a gift, every whim of the NCAA is a command. And that's what these guys at Northwestern are trying to change.
 
2014-02-24 04:27:06 PM  

lennavan: Because that's what you're saying. If two people show up to Northwestern University and both need financial help, you want to give the kid who can play football a free ride while telling the other kid to go fark himself.


I never said or implied any such thing, but that's an interesting leap you made.
 
2014-02-24 04:33:17 PM  

phyrkrakr: He has no input on how those duties and responsibilities are imposed, nor can he fight for better rewards for his talents.


Problem here is that you skipped over the fact that the student chooses the school, not the other way around.

You've also painted the entire scenario in such a bleak and ominous light that yeah, Northwestern players couldn't help but sound like heroes.

phyrkrakr: Everything they receive is a gift, every whim of the NCAA is a command.


This one's my favorite.  The only thing you're missing is Vincent Price to read it aloud.
 
2014-02-24 04:54:08 PM  

phyrkrakr: I'm going to try very hard to keep the money side out of this argument completely


That's not possible - the entire point here is money.  Without money, this isn't an issue because then it would be like intramural sports kids unionizing and no one would give a shiat either way.

phyrkrakr: They're not allowed to challenge unfair rules or demand fair compensation.


I think you read too far into my post.  I'm not actually against these kids unionizing, I most definitely think they should and if they can get the Universities to agree to it, good for them.  But if push comes to shove, I'm siding with the University.

phyrkrakr: Everything they receive is a gift, every whim of the NCAA is a command.


That's correct.  A University is an academic institution, not an athletic one.  Either you get in and pay your way based on the merits of your academic credentials or you don't.  That is the only merit based way to make decisions.  Also, for giggles and attention or whatever, Universities decided to add a bonus entry system for people who play sports.  You don't get to biatch about the bonus entry system.

phyrkrakr: The football player can must play, or he can be kicked out.


That's fundamentally not true.  They do not get kicked out, they lose the financial backing.

phyrkrakr: Just like the autoworker can stop building cars, or the letter carrier can stop delivering mail.


Wow.  So all of the kids at Universities who do not have scholarships are under the same pressures as unemployed autoworkers?  Or perhaps is your analogy stupid?
 
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