If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Stuff.co.nz)   The world's oldest rock found on Australian sheep farm   (stuff.co.nz) divider line 55
    More: Cool, Australia, oldest rocks, Earth, sheep husbandry, Age of the Earth, geosciences, Nature Geoscience, geology  
•       •       •

7990 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Feb 2014 at 6:11 AM (29 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



55 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-02-24 01:38:54 AM
Duh. Where else would it be.
 
2014-02-24 05:06:06 AM
Hey, man, is that Freedom Rock?
 
2014-02-24 06:15:47 AM

FirstNationalBastard: Hey, man, is that Freedom Rock?


Yeah, man!
 
2014-02-24 06:15:50 AM
Well, turn it uo, man!
 
2014-02-24 06:16:28 AM
up

turn it up
 
2014-02-24 06:19:12 AM
Is it older than the Bunyip?

/you better get home, quickly
 
2014-02-24 06:27:13 AM
Dirty deeds
DONE WITH SHEEP!!!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5aYLxLNvyKU
 
2014-02-24 06:27:32 AM
6000 years old. Wow.
 
2014-02-24 06:28:19 AM

stirfrybry: Well, turn it uo, man!


Looooord I was born a Ramblin' Maaaaaan...
 
2014-02-24 06:38:30 AM

Slagnasty: 6000 years old. Wow.


upload.wikimedia.org

Approves.
 
2014-02-24 06:49:04 AM
www.rockstarhq.com

4 eva
 
2014-02-24 06:54:41 AM
I think they'll find older ones in Montana soon
i1.ytimg.com
 
2014-02-24 06:55:38 AM
Abe Vigoda wondered what happened to his old skipping stone
 
2014-02-24 07:00:18 AM
Technically, wouldn't the oldest rock be in the core of the earth at the very center (from when the earth was formed) ?

1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-02-24 07:00:47 AM
Because this is such an important discovery, I care so much!
 
2014-02-24 07:27:08 AM
I need to re-watch 'Skippy the bush Kangaroo' again.

Are Bindi Irwin's boobs 18 yet?

/Crikey!
 
2014-02-24 07:29:27 AM
Aren't we all living on the oldest Earth rock?
 
2014-02-24 07:35:47 AM
Who is this Tiny Crystal?
 
2014-02-24 07:37:58 AM

HindiDiscoMonster: Technically, wouldn't the oldest rock be in the core of the earth at the very center (from when the earth was formed) ?

[1.bp.blogspot.com image 225x169]


They don't count the hot sticky love rock if you want to get technical about it, mon.
 
2014-02-24 07:43:26 AM
i.huffpost.com
 
2014-02-24 07:44:07 AM
www.ripitup.co.nz
 
2014-02-24 07:46:23 AM
It's just poop from when Abe Vigoda visited there as a child.
 
2014-02-24 08:01:37 AM
What's my mother in law doing on an Australian sheep farm? Oh wait, that's the oldest brick!

img.fark.net
 
2014-02-24 08:25:59 AM

Sybarite:


Came for this.

/ have satisfaction
 
2014-02-24 09:04:09 AM

HindiDiscoMonster: Technically, wouldn't the oldest rock be in the core of the earth at the very center (from when the earth was formed) ?


Rocks, as commonly defined, are silicates. There are vanishingly few silicates in the Earth's core, because they're too light and floated up to form the mantle and crust. The oldest metal would be found in the core of the Earth.

---===*
TMYK
 
2014-02-24 09:10:06 AM
Weird, I just found the worlds oldest sheep on a New Zealand rock farm.
 
2014-02-24 09:24:58 AM

Slagnasty: 6000 years old. Wow.



46% of Americans believe this.
 
2014-02-24 09:28:54 AM

illannoyin: I need to re-watch 'Skippy the bush Kangaroo' again.

Are Bindi Irwin's boobs 18 yet?

/Crikey!


Two and a half years to go...

/aisle seat please
 
2014-02-24 09:38:53 AM
Was this sheep farm in the Alps?  "I'm yodeling for my sheep, mate."
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-02-24 09:51:47 AM
They used a technique known as atom-probe tomography that was able to identify individual atoms of lead in the crystal and determine their mass, and confirmed that the zircon was indeed 4.4 billion years old.

Yeah, cool science and all, but in my high school physics class we watched girls' hair stand on end when they touched a Van de Graaf generator.
 
2014-02-24 09:54:53 AM
Rock
On a sheep farm
Meh
 
2014-02-24 10:16:52 AM

hervatski: Duh. Where else would it be.


You say that, but the region where it is found is one of the remnants of the oldest, most stable parts of the crust, called cratons.

Along with some places in the Northwest Territory, Western Australia is the oldest stable portion of land.  Before we had oceans, before the earth's surface had completely cooled and solidified, that ground was already there, and still is.   That's pretty amazing.
 
2014-02-24 10:42:08 AM

Clever Neologism: hervatski: Duh. Where else would it be.

You say that, but the region where it is found is one of the remnants of the oldest, most stable parts of the crust, called cratons.


upload.wikimedia.org

 
2014-02-24 10:51:00 AM

Clever Neologism: hervatski: Duh. Where else would it be.

You say that, but the region where it is found is one of the remnants of the oldest, most stable parts of the crust, called cratons.

Along with some places in the Northwest Territory, Western Australia is the oldest stable portion of land.  Before we had oceans, before the earth's surface had completely cooled and solidified, that ground was already there, and still is.   That's pretty amazing.


PSH....thats why I said duh!
 
2014-02-24 11:18:18 AM

yakmans_dad: Clever Neologism: hervatski: Duh. Where else would it be.

You say that, but the region where it is found is one of the remnants of the oldest, most stable parts of the crust, called cratons.


[upload.wikimedia.org image 200x200]


mmmmmm craton orogeny

*FAP*
 
2014-02-24 11:23:29 AM

hervatski: Clever Neologism: hervatski: Duh. Where else would it be.

You say that, but the region where it is found is one of the remnants of the oldest, most stable parts of the crust, called cratons.

Along with some places in the Northwest Territory, Western Australia is the oldest stable portion of land.  Before we had oceans, before the earth's surface had completely cooled and solidified, that ground was already there, and still is.   That's pretty amazing.

PSH....thats why I said duh!


Well, there's tons of old flora and fauna there, as well as all sorts of weird stuff.  Australia's just generally farked up as has most of the  "most X of any Y" type of things in the world ;).
 
2014-02-24 11:30:14 AM
I did a study and found that all rocks, and matter in general, is around 13.798±0.037 billion years old. Can I have my grant now?
 
2014-02-24 11:34:22 AM
Where else would the Nazis have hidden it?
 
2014-02-24 11:42:09 AM
Scientists using two different age-determining techniques have shown that a tiny zircon crystal found on a sheep farm in Western Australia was the oldest known piece of our planet, dating to 4.4 billion years ago.

If two different age-determining techniques actually got a date within a factor of ten of each other then this is the real news.
 
2014-02-24 01:09:25 PM

HindiDiscoMonster: Technically, wouldn't the oldest rock be in the core of the earth at the very center (from when the earth was formed) ?

[1.bp.blogspot.com image 225x169]


No. The core of the earth is molten iron and other heavy metals.
www.fromscreentotheme.com
No rocks!
 
2014-02-24 05:57:56 PM

MadMattressMack: I did a study and found that all rocks, and matter in general, is around 13.798±0.037 billion years old. Can I have my grant now?


There is not a single rock in the universe that is anywhere near 13 billion years old.

/Hint: most of the elements rocks are composed of did not exist until billions of years later.
 
2014-02-24 05:58:01 PM
wouldn't it be 6001 years by now?
 
2014-02-24 06:03:22 PM

theorellior: HindiDiscoMonster: Technically, wouldn't the oldest rock be in the core of the earth at the very center (from when the earth was formed) ?

Rocks, as commonly defined, are silicates. There are vanishingly few silicates in the Earth's core, because they're too light and floated up to form the mantle and crust. The oldest metal would be found in the core of the Earth.

---===*
TMYK


actually, as I understand it, wouldn't the core be solid from pressure alone (not molten like the mantle - but still hot as shiat) ? At least that is what I was taught, not that anyone has actually been there to confirm it... Our knowledge of the earth's inner layers is mostly hypothesis I believe. Since we don't have an xray machine, let alone a large enough piece of film to verify the hypothesis (not to mention the power necessary to emit enough xrays at enough power to penetrate, which would have the pesky side effect of cooking all life probably), I suppose hypotheses will have to do for now.
 
2014-02-24 07:50:16 PM
HindiDiscoMonster:
actually, as I understand it, wouldn't the core be solid from pressure alone (not molten like the mantle - but still hot as shiat) ? At least that is what I was taught, not that anyone has actually been there to confirm it... Our knowledge of the earth's inner layers is mostly hypothesis I believe. Since we don't have an xray machine, let alone a large enough piece of film to verify the hypothesis (not to mention the power necessary to emit enough xrays at enough power to penetrate, which would have the pesky side effect of cooking all life probably), I suppose hypotheses will have to do for now.

Wait, you're telling me Hillary Swank did not travel there when it had stopped rotating? I've been lied to through moving pictures, and it all seemed so real.
 
2014-02-24 08:07:42 PM

bearded clamorer: [i.huffpost.com image 570x238]


I larfed.
 
2014-02-24 08:17:43 PM

HindiDiscoMonster: theorellior: HindiDiscoMonster: Technically, wouldn't the oldest rock be in the core of the earth at the very center (from when the earth was formed) ?

Rocks, as commonly defined, are silicates. There are vanishingly few silicates in the Earth's core, because they're too light and floated up to form the mantle and crust. The oldest metal would be found in the core of the Earth.

---===*
TMYK

actually, as I understand it, wouldn't the core be solid from pressure alone (not molten like the mantle - but still hot as shiat) ? At least that is what I was taught, not that anyone has actually been there to confirm it... Our knowledge of the earth's inner layers is mostly hypothesis I believe. Since we don't have an xray machine, let alone a large enough piece of film to verify the hypothesis (not to mention the power necessary to emit enough xrays at enough power to penetrate, which would have the pesky side effect of cooking all life probably), I suppose hypotheses will have to do for now.


No, our core is molten and it is what generates our magnetic field.  If the core would cool to a solid, we'd be farked.
 
2014-02-24 08:59:27 PM

qgmonkey: HindiDiscoMonster: theorellior: HindiDiscoMonster: Technically, wouldn't the oldest rock be in the core of the earth at the very center (from when the earth was formed) ?

Rocks, as commonly defined, are silicates. There are vanishingly few silicates in the Earth's core, because they're too light and floated up to form the mantle and crust. The oldest metal would be found in the core of the Earth.

---===*
TMYK

actually, as I understand it, wouldn't the core be solid from pressure alone (not molten like the mantle - but still hot as shiat) ? At least that is what I was taught, not that anyone has actually been there to confirm it... Our knowledge of the earth's inner layers is mostly hypothesis I believe. Since we don't have an xray machine, let alone a large enough piece of film to verify the hypothesis (not to mention the power necessary to emit enough xrays at enough power to penetrate, which would have the pesky side effect of cooking all life probably), I suppose hypotheses will have to do for now.

No, our core is molten and it is what generates our magnetic field.  If the core would cool to a solid, we'd be farked.


upload.wikimedia.org
/Protip: Pressure and friction create heat... they also cause things to solidify which would otherwise be liquid.
 
2014-02-24 09:59:34 PM
we didnt land on zircon rock, zircon rock landed on us!
 
2014-02-24 09:59:58 PM
It measured only about 200 by 400 microns, about twice the diameter of a human hair

That's not even close to being a rock. That's not even big enough to be called a grain.
 
2014-02-24 10:09:45 PM

HindiDiscoMonster: actually, as I understand it, wouldn't the core be solid from pressure alone (not molten like the mantle - but still hot as shiat) ?


It would and is, but that doesn't stop silicates from being substantially lighter than iron, nickel, iridium and other siderophiles and thus differentiating into the mantle pretty quickly after the Earth formed.
 
Displayed 50 of 55 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report