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(Bloomberg)   Arctic drilling delayed for at least 15 years due to technical and logistical challenges, ice   (bloomberg.com) divider line 18
    More: Cool, Arctic, Statoil, countries by natural gas proven reserves, gasfields, Prudhoe Bay, Barents Sea, Permian, Cnet Technology Inc.  
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1531 clicks; posted to Business » on 23 Feb 2014 at 9:26 PM (25 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



18 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-02-23 08:47:43 PM
Unpossible, the Arctic has been ice free since at least last year

img.fark.net
 
2014-02-23 09:35:15 PM
Because the ice sheets are breaking up, there are now "ice islands" floating around. These are like ice burgs, but bigger. If a rig is in the path of one, it is likely to get sheared off. Drilling was easier when ice just stayed ice.
 
2014-02-23 09:35:26 PM

DesertDemonWY: Unpossible, the Arctic has been ice free since at least last year

[img.fark.net image 483x620]


And since they article claims a 30 year average from only 21 years of data, I have to question their grasp of the whole maths thingie.
 
2014-02-23 09:43:39 PM

DesertDemonWY: Unpossible, the Arctic has been ice free since at least last year

[img.fark.net image 483x620]


Don't you know what "consensus" means?

Deal with it.
 
2014-02-23 10:00:26 PM
IPCC predictions of ice free summers are still several decades away. And people mocking earlier predictions always seem to neglect the error bars that attend such things. After 2007 and 2012, arctic ice predictions became like the bare knuckle fight in "Snatch" ("All bets are off.") Predictions of ice extent aren't like those of Nostradamus.

The chief problem for drilling  in the Arctic isn't ice -- its good old fashioned wind. That and the fact that there's no infrastructure to deal with inevitable mishaps.
 
2014-02-23 10:10:12 PM
Good. Pretty soon that CO2 won't ever be economically extractable.

davebuemi.com
 
2014-02-23 10:16:30 PM
Have they tried coaxing the oil and black crude to the surface with Biore Strips?

It worked for my pimply cousin Gunther.
 
2014-02-23 10:48:32 PM
Mis-direction.
 
2014-02-23 11:51:17 PM

StopLurkListen: Good. Pretty soon that CO2 won't ever be economically extractable.


That is retail rates.  Around here the retail rate is $.22/kwh yet the huge smelter is paying less than $.025kwh.  The odd thing is that the cost of lines will get more expensive and become a larger part of the cost until local night time storage is solved.  Solar is now to the point where the extra stuff is more than the cost of the panels and most of the cost of the panels is the hail resistant glass.

/I'm wondering when curved glass for solar will come out since it is stronger per weight than the flat stuff and car windshields are now cheaper, thinner and stronger than what goes on a large panel.
 
2014-02-24 12:40:39 AM
The obvious solution is a robotic underwater drilling rig. We start with a platform akin to the crawlers used by nasa at cape canaveral, slap a few solid state RTGs on it, an automated drill rig, and a pipe locker.

Well cementing can be outsourced to Schlumberger. fark them.
 
2014-02-24 01:02:46 AM

wildcardjack: The obvious solution is a robotic underwater drilling rig. We start with a platform akin to the crawlers used by nasa at cape canaveral, slap a few solid state RTGs on it, an automated drill rig, and a pipe locker.

Well cementing can be outsourced to Schlumberger. fark them.


The floating drilling wells can already disconnect and reconnect when needed due to large storms.  The problem with very large sheets of ice is they may hit another one and pin the floating oil rig between them.
 
2014-02-24 01:28:56 AM

DON.MAC: wildcardjack: The obvious solution is a robotic underwater drilling rig. We start with a platform akin to the crawlers used by nasa at cape canaveral, slap a few solid state RTGs on it, an automated drill rig, and a pipe locker.

Well cementing can be outsourced to Schlumberger. fark them.

The floating drilling wells can already disconnect and reconnect when needed due to large storms.  The problem with very large sheets of ice is they may hit another one and pin the floating oil rig between them.


You're no fun. I was drafting a nuclear powered monster slightly smaller than a bucket wheel excavator, working away at the bottom of the sea. The sort of benthic monster that can only be seen 10 meters at a time. You just want to run standard platforms in the farking cold and skedaddle at the sight of a berg.
 
2014-02-24 01:35:36 AM

wildcardjack: DON.MAC: wildcardjack: The obvious solution is a robotic underwater drilling rig. We start with a platform akin to the crawlers used by nasa at cape canaveral, slap a few solid state RTGs on it, an automated drill rig, and a pipe locker.

Well cementing can be outsourced to Schlumberger. fark them.

The floating drilling wells can already disconnect and reconnect when needed due to large storms.  The problem with very large sheets of ice is they may hit another one and pin the floating oil rig between them.

You're no fun. I was drafting a nuclear powered monster slightly smaller than a bucket wheel excavator, working away at the bottom of the sea. The sort of benthic monster that can only be seen 10 meters at a time. You just want to run standard platforms in the farking cold and skedaddle at the sight of a berg.


It isn't the drilling that is the problem since that oil is shallow.  It is what you need to do once your drill hits it.  Since they will all be new fields, the pressure will be high and the oil will leak all over the place at very high pressure.  I expect most of the first fields are from when the subs have run into oil in the past.
 
2014-02-24 05:32:51 AM
"The Arctic holds 30 percent of the world's undiscovered natural gas reserves and 13 percent of its undiscovered oil,"

If it's undiscovered, how do they know how much there is?

Stupid
 
2014-02-24 06:52:09 AM
static3.wikia.nocookie.net

No harm delaying it, really
 
2014-02-24 08:00:12 AM

BolivarShagnasty: "The Arctic holds 30 percent of the world's undiscovered natural gas reserves and 13 percent of its undiscovered oil,"

If it's undiscovered, how do they know how much there is?

Stupid


www.apfelmag.com
 
2014-02-24 10:23:16 AM

BolivarShagnasty: "The Arctic holds 30 percent of the world's undiscovered natural gas reserves and 13 percent of its undiscovered oil,"

If it's undiscovered, how do they know how much there is?

Stupid


"...according to U.S. Geological Survey estimates.  "

Probably from the kinds of geological signatures that say  "here be oil" that exist elsewhere.

/Just going out on a limb.
//Didn't quit reading after the straight line.
 
2014-02-24 12:17:17 PM
This wouldn't be a problem if Obama just removed all his job killing regulations that are forcing the costs to be so high.
 
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