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(Buzzfeed)   Twelve common dishes you can order at a Mexican Restaurant--that aren't really Mexican dishes at all. The thirteenth thing on the list is just blindingly obvious   (buzzfeed.com) divider line 92
    More: Ironic, Mexican Revolution  
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1855 clicks; posted to FarkUs » on 23 Feb 2014 at 1:24 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-02-23 10:38:44 AM  
Nachos were invented by a Mexican chef in a Mexican restaurant in Mexico. How is it not a Mexican dish ?
 
2014-02-23 10:42:21 AM  

Once and Future Lurker: Nachos were invented by a Mexican chef in a Mexican restaurant in Mexico. How is it not a Mexican dish ?


Buzzfeed.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-02-23 10:46:43 AM  
Most of them are from Mexico, unless you are one of the people who accept the US version of the border adjustments of the early 19th Century.
 
2014-02-23 10:53:49 AM  
This is ironic ... how? This is obvious. So obvious, in fact, that it needs a "No Farking Shiat" tag.
 
2014-02-23 11:01:21 AM  
Meh, I don't care.

/I like Tex Mex anyway
 
2014-02-23 11:03:44 AM  
Authentic or not, they're delicious, as is the authentic stuff.

The nuclear orange queso may be Tex-Mex, but Queso Fundido is authentically Mexican.

www.jaunted.com
 
2014-02-23 11:04:20 AM  

Once and Future Lurker: Nachos were invented by a Mexican chef in a Mexican restaurant in Mexico. How is it not a Mexican dish ?


It's not "traditional" I suspect.

Mexican cuisine is a cuisine that is all about cross cultural influences. Mexico itself is a pastiche of tribes and people that have been crossing and mixing things up for a long while, region to region. It IS one of the great cuisines in my mind, not just for all the time spent in the South West, and in Texas, but because it is one of the great peasant cuisines that can be adapted and played with, with great abandon. It took in the Spanish influences, the great influx of new critters brought in by the Spanish, and then gave back a great deal. What we call modern Italian, would be nowhere without the influence of the New World's crops. Likewise, what we call modern French has been heavily influenced by New World crops, not to mention the influences of the Far East.

Mexican, traditional Mexican, has a huge depth to it. It can be light, it has the Holy Trinity of the Three Sisters of corn, squash, and beans, which combine to provide companion planting, as well as a nutritionally balanced diet. Region to region, there are variations, introductions of ingredients that then flesh out these regional cuisines to be distinct. That these regional cuisines have married,  and traveled, along with the introduction of new crops, domesticated animals that were not native, and now made part of that cuisine, shows the versatility of the cuisine in general. Good Mexican is breath taking in its richness and variation, and can be subtle, and complex as anything you will find in France or Spain, or Morocco. It is one of my favorite cuisines to cook with, because it has so damn much variation. To master it, takes a lifetime, because there is so much to draw on, and so much history. Going to a traditional Mexican place is an exploration far beyond the burritos and heavy rice that you find in the hole in the wall shacks, and yet, even there, you can find brilliance in the Mom and Pop places.
 
2014-02-23 11:05:15 AM  
Rosca de Reyes is on there because it originates in Spain?

Come f*cking on!
 
2014-02-23 11:06:53 AM  
Not that fact-checking Buzzfeed is all that difficult, but even for them this one was all over the place.

3. Burritos
Although its origins go back to Ciudad Juarez during the Mexican Revolution, Los Angeles' El Cholo Spanish Cafe served the first restaurant-style burrito in the 1930s.


In what universe is Ciudad Juarez not considerd part of Mexico?

5. Taquitos
In 1934, Aurora Guerrero served these fried tacos at her restaurant Cielito Lindo in Los Angeles.


A Mexican immigrant in a Mexican restaurant. Seems pretty Mexican to me.

6. Hard Shell Tacos
The recipe for hard shell tacos first appeared in the 1914 English language cookbook California Mexican-Spanish Cookbook.


"Mexican-Spanish" seems pretty Mexican to me.

7. Nachos
Spontaneously made by Ignacio "Nacho" Anaya in the bordertown of Piedras Negras in Mexico, they were first served to the wives of U.S. Army officers during World War II.


Again, in what universe is Pedras Negras not part of Mexico?

8. Queso
This authentically Texan dip was inspired from melted cheese dips in Chihuahua, Mexico.


Again, in what universe is  Chihuahua, Mexico not part of Mexico?

13. Taco Bell
This one goes without saying.


Technically, Taco Bell doesn't even count as "food" so including it on any list of "food" is an automatic fail.
 
2014-02-23 11:07:18 AM  

hubiestubert: Once and Future Lurker: Nachos were invented by a Mexican chef in a Mexican restaurant in Mexico. How is it not a Mexican dish ?

It's not "traditional" I suspect.

Mexican cuisine is a cuisine that is all about cross cultural influences. Mexico itself is a pastiche of tribes and people that have been crossing and mixing things up for a long while, region to region. It IS one of the great cuisines in my mind, not just for all the time spent in the South West, and in Texas, but because it is one of the great peasant cuisines that can be adapted and played with, with great abandon. It took in the Spanish influences, the great influx of new critters brought in by the Spanish, and then gave back a great deal. What we call modern Italian, would be nowhere without the influence of the New World's crops. Likewise, what we call modern French has been heavily influenced by New World crops, not to mention the influences of the Far East.

Mexican, traditional Mexican, has a huge depth to it. It can be light, it has the Holy Trinity of the Three Sisters of corn, squash, and beans, which combine to provide companion planting, as well as a nutritionally balanced diet. Region to region, there are variations, introductions of ingredients that then flesh out these regional cuisines to be distinct. That these regional cuisines have married,  and traveled, along with the introduction of new crops, domesticated animals that were not native, and now made part of that cuisine, shows the versatility of the cuisine in general. Good Mexican is breath taking in its richness and variation, and can be subtle, and complex as anything you will find in France or Spain, or Morocco. It is one of my favorite cuisines to cook with, because it has so damn much variation. To master it, takes a lifetime, because there is so much to draw on, and so much history. Going to a traditional Mexican place is an exploration far beyond the burritos and heavy rice that you find in the hole in the wall shacks, and ...


Blimey ...

mostlyaveragejoe.com
 
2014-02-23 11:09:16 AM  

Man On A Mission: In what universe is Ciudad Juarez not considerd part of Mexico?


And that's, like, the "I'mma kill you" part of Mexico!
 
2014-02-23 11:15:19 AM  
HawgWild: I'm a chef, it's what I do for a living. Studying food, its origins, and its influences is kinda my job.
 
2014-02-23 11:16:06 AM  

Once and Future Lurker: Nachos were invented by a Mexican chef in a Mexican restaurant in Mexico. How is it not a Mexican dish ?


Kind of sums up the whole list, doesn't it? About everything on there comes from Mexico or a former part of Mexico.

The stupid, it burns worse than a pepper-eating contest on its way out.
 
2014-02-23 11:17:38 AM  

hubiestubert: HawgWild: I'm a chef, it's what I do for a living. Studying food, its origins, and its influences is kinda my job.


I was wondering. Because otherwise, that would have been rather random.
 
2014-02-23 11:22:32 AM  
I don't know from "authentic". But I do know that if it comes off a truck, it's probably muy deliciouso.
 
2014-02-23 11:22:36 AM  

Man On A Mission: Not that fact-checking Buzzfeed is all that difficult, but even for them this one was all over the place.

3. Burritos
Although its origins go back to Ciudad Juarez during the Mexican Revolution, Los Angeles' El Cholo Spanish Cafe served the first restaurant-style burrito in the 1930s.

In what universe is Ciudad Juarez not considerd part of Mexico?

5. Taquitos
In 1934, Aurora Guerrero served these fried tacos at her restaurant Cielito Lindo in Los Angeles.

A Mexican immigrant in a Mexican restaurant. Seems pretty Mexican to me.

6. Hard Shell Tacos
The recipe for hard shell tacos first appeared in the 1914 English language cookbook California Mexican-Spanish Cookbook.

"Mexican-Spanish" seems pretty Mexican to me.

7. Nachos
Spontaneously made by Ignacio "Nacho" Anaya in the bordertown of Piedras Negras in Mexico, they were first served to the wives of U.S. Army officers during World War II.

Again, in what universe is Pedras Negras not part of Mexico?

8. Queso
This authentically Texan dip was inspired from melted cheese dips in Chihuahua, Mexico.

Again, in what universe is  Chihuahua, Mexico not part of Mexico?

13. Taco Bell
This one goes without saying.

Technically, Taco Bell doesn't even count as "food" so including it on any list of "food" is an automatic fail.


I was thinking along the same lines when I read this. Are they only considering foods that originated in Mexican restaurants as authentic Mexican food?
 
2014-02-23 11:24:53 AM  
Taquitos are disgusting. That is all.
 
2014-02-23 11:25:53 AM  

The English Major: Taquitos are disgusting. That is all.


It's meat and cheese wrapped in a tortilla and fried.

HOW CAN YOU NOT LIKE...

Oh, wait.
 
2014-02-23 11:28:39 AM  
Next they'll be trying to tell us Taco Bell isn't Mexican

/I mean... hello.... it's got Taco right in the name
 
2014-02-23 11:28:45 AM  
antidisestablishmentarianism: Are they only considering foods that originated in Mexican restaurants as authentic Mexican food?

Technically, wouldn't ALL restaurants in Mexico be considered Mexican restaurants?
 
2014-02-23 11:31:06 AM  

Man On A Mission: Technically, wouldn't ALL restaurants in Mexico be considered Mexican restaurants?


Yes. But this is Buzzfeed. In a week we could see an article calling KFC and McDonald's Mexican restaurants because there are some in Mexico.
 
2014-02-23 11:33:10 AM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Next they'll be trying to tell us Taco Bell isn't Mexican

/I mean... hello.... it's got Taco right in the name


Hmmmmmmm ...

Using that logic, if I were to name my first child "Taco", would that make the child Mexican?

Taco Isosceles "Last name". Rolls off the tongue.
 
2014-02-23 11:35:12 AM  

HawgWild: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Next they'll be trying to tell us Taco Bell isn't Mexican

/I mean... hello.... it's got Taco right in the name

Hmmmmmmm ...

Using that logic, if I were to name my first child "Taco", would that make the child Mexican?

Taco Isosceles "Last name". Rolls off the tongue.


Mexican

/or a mini bike
//gawd I'm old
 
2014-02-23 11:37:19 AM  
Welp, that settles it. My first child shall be named "Taco Isosceles."
 
2014-02-23 11:39:12 AM  

Shostie: It's meat and cheese wrapped in a tortilla and fried.

HOW CAN YOU NOT LIKE...

Oh, wait.


Exactly. FRIED. You have answered your own question.
 
2014-02-23 11:40:29 AM  

The English Major: Shostie: It's meat and cheese wrapped in a tortilla and fried.

HOW CAN YOU NOT LIKE...

Oh, wait.

Exactly. FRIED. You have answered your own question.


Yeah, I still don't get it ...
 
2014-02-23 11:45:32 AM  
Texas and California can both count as Mexican, seeing how we stole them from Mexico back in 1848.
 
2014-02-23 11:48:28 AM  
 
2014-02-23 11:48:54 AM  

HawgWild: Welp, that settles it. My first child shall be named "Taco Isosceles."


At least it's not a stripper name.
 
2014-02-23 11:49:00 AM  
Am I the only one that is not surprised that "Tostitos" do not have a rich and storied history?  It's a brand of tortilla chip. Do people consider them a unique kind of food?
 
2014-02-23 11:52:51 AM  

Etchy333: Am I the only one that is not surprised that "Tostitos" do not have a rich and storied history?  It's a brand of tortilla chip. Do people consider them a unique kind of food?


cpub.s3.amazonaws.com

These are the best tortilla chips you can buy in a store.

And I hate recommending them to people because the store does not stock a lot of them.
 
2014-02-23 11:53:54 AM  

EatenTheSun: Etchy333: Am I the only one that is not surprised that "Tostitos" do not have a rich and storied history?  It's a brand of tortilla chip. Do people consider them a unique kind of food?

[cpub.s3.amazonaws.com image 180x180]

These are the best tortilla chips you can buy in a store.

And I hate recommending them to people because the store does not stock a lot of them.


YES!
 
2014-02-23 11:57:11 AM  

hubiestubert: Once and Future Lurker: Nachos were invented by a Mexican chef in a Mexican restaurant in Mexico. How is it not a Mexican dish ?

It's not "traditional" I suspect.

Mexican cuisine is a cuisine that is all about cross cultural influences. Mexico itself is a pastiche of tribes and people that have been crossing and mixing things up for a long while, region to region. It IS one of the great cuisines in my mind, not just for all the time spent in the South West, and in Texas, but because it is one of the great peasant cuisines that can be adapted and played with, with great abandon. It took in the Spanish influences, the great influx of new critters brought in by the Spanish, and then gave back a great deal. What we call modern Italian, would be nowhere without the influence of the New World's crops. Likewise, what we call modern French has been heavily influenced by New World crops, not to mention the influences of the Far East.

Mexican, traditional Mexican, has a huge depth to it. It can be light, it has the Holy Trinity of the Three Sisters of corn, squash, and beans, which combine to provide companion planting, as well as a nutritionally balanced diet. Region to region, there are variations, introductions of ingredients that then flesh out these regional cuisines to be distinct. That these regional cuisines have married,  and traveled, along with the introduction of new crops, domesticated animals that were not native, and now made part of that cuisine, shows the versatility of the cuisine in general. Good Mexican is breath taking in its richness and variation, and can be subtle, and complex as anything you will find in France or Spain, or Morocco. It is one of my favorite cuisines to cook with, because it has so damn much variation. To master it, takes a lifetime, because there is so much to draw on, and so much history. Going to a traditional Mexican place is an exploration far beyond the burritos and heavy rice that you find in the hole in the wall shacks, and ...


Not to mention that actual Mexican food varies as much as actual Mexicans in the various regions. it's not like all those wonderful Mexican seafood dishes developed in the Mexico city area.

You said it perfectly when you describe it as peasant food. Poor people working with what they have forces them to be creative and it eventually turns into something awesome. Just look at what poor people have done with Cajun and that incredible Low Country style the slaves of South Carolina gave us.

Articles like this are stoopid and foodies are stoopid if they insist on food being "authentic". Fark that! Great cooking is a creative process and food should continually evolve. A great chef should be revered like a master artist. Because it is art in every sense of the word.

buzzfeed is stoopid
 
2014-02-23 11:58:24 AM  

Etchy333: Am I the only one that is not surprised that "Tostitos" do not have a rich and storied history?  It's a brand of tortilla chip. Do people consider them a unique kind of food?


Next you're going to tell us Chef Boyardee isn't authentic Italian cuisine
 
2014-02-23 12:06:13 PM  

EatenTheSun: Etchy333: Am I the only one that is not surprised that "Tostitos" do not have a rich and storied history?  It's a brand of tortilla chip. Do people consider them a unique kind of food?

[cpub.s3.amazonaws.com image 180x180]

These are the best tortilla chips you can buy in a store.

And I hate recommending them to people because the store does not stock a lot of them.


I'm a fan of the ones you can buy at the Mexican grocery stores that they make from just frying their day old tortillas. For around $1.50 you get a giant 2 lbs zip-tied plastic bag filled with tasty tortilla chips, and the quality is always good if they source their tortillas from a good supplier to begin with.
 
2014-02-23 12:09:58 PM  

Notabunny: Next you're going to tell us Chef Boyardee isn't authentic Italian cuisine


Yeah... about that.

In 1924, Italian immigrant Ettore "Hector" Boiardi opened the Il Giardino d'Italia restaurant at East 9th Street and Woodland Avenue in Cleveland, Ohio. The idea for Chef Boyardee came about when restaurant customers began asking Boiardi for his recipes. He opened a factory in 1928, moving production to Milton, Pennsylvania, ten years later, where enough tomatoes and mushrooms could be grown. He decided to name his product "Boy-Ar-Dee" to help Americans pronounce his name. [source]

So, yes, it did indeed start out as "authentic" Italian cuisine. Granted, what happened to it after Boiardi sold out to American Home Products in 1946 (which became International Home Foods and then was bought out by ConAgra in 200) is a lesson in what happens to good intentions.
 
2014-02-23 12:23:00 PM  

Man On A Mission: bought out by ConAgra in 200)


AD or BC?
 
2014-02-23 12:25:10 PM  

Shostie: Man On A Mission: bought out by ConAgra in 200)

AD or BC?


BCE

/Before Corn Ethanol
 
2014-02-23 01:07:40 PM  

HawgWild: hubiestubert: HawgWild: I'm a chef, it's what I do for a living. Studying food, its origins, and its influences is kinda my job.

I was wondering. Because otherwise, that would have been rather random.


Food. Politics. Language studies. Gals with tattoos. Bouncing. Those are sort of my schticks. I occasionally make forays into being tangentally funny with Firefly Motivators and LOLBrowncoats.
 
2014-02-23 01:19:39 PM  

The English Major: Taquitos are disgusting. That is all.


So says someone who likes cilantro.
 
2014-02-23 01:20:57 PM  

twistedmetal: The English Major: Taquitos are disgusting. That is all.

So says someone who likes cilantro.


What's so wrong with cilantro? It adds a good flavor to salsa.
 
2014-02-23 01:21:58 PM  
I think the two Latino authors are trolling you. In a way they are like Gus Arriola whose comic strip "Gordo" did similar stuff many years ago. The humor is gentle and slow, but it seriously pokes at racist bothersome attitudes.
 
2014-02-23 01:23:52 PM  

antidisestablishmentarianism: twistedmetal: The English Major: Taquitos are disgusting. That is all.

So says someone who likes cilantro.

What's so wrong with cilantro? It adds a good flavor to salsa.


If you like soap flavored salsa

/ducks
 
2014-02-23 01:24:48 PM  

antidisestablishmentarianism: twistedmetal: The English Major: Taquitos are disgusting. That is all.

So says someone who likes cilantro.

What's so wrong with cilantro? It adds a good flavor to salsa.


MMmm, soap.
 
2014-02-23 01:36:40 PM  
Well of f*cking course restaurant-style burritos are a restaurant food and not entirely true to the historically sacred self-contained, rolled, man-portable, comida carry-and-delivery system.

Next you're going to tell me that when Obregón uttered the word "smothered" he was ordering the death of Pancho Villa, not how he wanted his burrito plate.
 
2014-02-23 01:50:22 PM  

The English Major: Taquitos are disgusting. That is all.


I came here to see if you'd commented.  Leaving satisfied.
 
2014-02-23 01:50:26 PM  

hubiestubert: Once and Future Lurker: Nachos were invented by a Mexican chef in a Mexican restaurant in Mexico. How is it not a Mexican dish ?

It's not "traditional" I suspect.

Mexican cuisine is a cuisine that is all about cross cultural influences. Mexico itself is a pastiche of tribes and people that have been crossing and mixing things up for a long while, region to region. It IS one of the great cuisines in my mind, not just for all the time spent in the South West, and in Texas, but because it is one of the great peasant cuisines that can be adapted and played with, with great abandon. It took in the Spanish influences, the great influx of new critters brought in by the Spanish, and then gave back a great deal. What we call modern Italian, would be nowhere without the influence of the New World's crops. Likewise, what we call modern French has been heavily influenced by New World crops, not to mention the influences of the Far East.

Mexican, traditional Mexican, has a huge depth to it. It can be light, it has the Holy Trinity of the Three Sisters of corn, squash, and beans, which combine to provide companion planting, as well as a nutritionally balanced diet. Region to region, there are variations, introductions of ingredients that then flesh out these regional cuisines to be distinct. That these regional cuisines have married,  and traveled, along with the introduction of new crops, domesticated animals that were not native, and now made part of that cuisine, shows the versatility of the cuisine in general. Good Mexican is breath taking in its richness and variation, and can be subtle, and complex as anything you will find in France or Spain, or Morocco. It is one of my favorite cuisines to cook with, because it has so damn much variation. To master it, takes a lifetime, because there is so much to draw on, and so much history. Going to a traditional Mexican place is an exploration far beyond the burritos and heavy rice that you find in the hole in the wall shacks, and ...


I really like your show on PBS (even though there's too much treif), but I've always had this nagging question: Why Chicago?
 
2014-02-23 02:28:30 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: antidisestablishmentarianism: twistedmetal: The English Major: Taquitos are disgusting. That is all.

So says someone who likes cilantro.

What's so wrong with cilantro? It adds a good flavor to salsa.

If you like soap flavored salsa

/ducks


There has got to be some gene or taste bud anomaly that makes some people hate cilantro. It tastes nothing like soap to me. Then again, I don't eat a lot of soap, so perhaps you are the expert.
 
2014-02-23 02:31:10 PM  

antidisestablishmentarianism: twistedmetal: The English Major: Taquitos are disgusting. That is all.

So says someone who likes cilantro.

What's so wrong with cilantro? It adds a good flavor to salsa.


Salsa without cilantro is like a lap dance without tears.
 
2014-02-23 02:36:54 PM  

fancynancysoap.com

 
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