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(American Live Wire)   It's been 192 years since the Vatican accepted heliocentrism, but 25% of Americans still don't understand it   (americanlivewire.com) divider line 26
    More: Sad, Americans, Earth, Vatican, National Science Foundation  
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2014-02-23 05:23:48 AM
 
2014-02-23 08:17:00 AM
Maybe more people would understand it if scientists stopped using big words like "heliocentric" when asking these survey questions.
 
2014-02-23 08:33:00 AM
But if I look up, the sun clearly moves across the sky. And I don't feel any movement so the earth has to be standing still.

Checkmate, science.
 
2014-02-23 08:53:52 AM
The Sun is there
 
2014-02-23 09:27:21 AM
Is there a Groundhog Day joke I'm missing what with the multi-greenlights of this story, or did I have a stroke and no-one told me?

Yes? Probably "yes."
 
2014-02-23 10:31:15 AM
Actually, the Earth doesn't revolve around the sun either.  Technically speaking.
 
2014-02-23 10:31:43 AM
They just think heliocentrism is having to pray to the Goodyear blimp, and have holy wars with those DirectTV and MetLife heathens.
 
2014-02-23 10:45:38 AM
The moon is smaller than the earth, but it's farther away.
 
2014-02-23 11:11:34 AM
Turtles all the way down.
 
2014-02-23 11:24:05 AM
The scary thing is, Americans do pretty well overall on that test, even compared to what we consider advanced countries. I think I saw a more expanded version over on the Atlantic website.
 
2014-02-23 11:25:22 AM
The universe was created last Tuesday.
 
2014-02-23 11:26:40 AM
And 34% or Europeans, so the point is?
 
2014-02-23 11:26:44 AM
So this thing has taken a life of its own now... we will revisit this dubious "fact" about Americans for the next couple of decades, it seems.

Nobody I know thinks the Earth doesn't orbit around the sun. My sample might be admittedly low, only a few hundred people, but not a single one thinks the sun orbits the earth. Not one.

This "study" is complete bulls hit.

Fundies are low hanging fruit, but they exist everywhere, not just in the US and come in many faiths. I'll agree they are all morans, looking for faith to fill the void of uncertainty and ignorance, instead of science. Don't lump the rest of us in with them.
 
2014-02-23 11:27:46 AM

mjbok: And 34% or Europeans, so the point is?


Quiet you, this dialogue is about smearing 'Mericuns!
 
2014-02-23 11:29:56 AM
There's that %25 again.
 
das
2014-02-23 11:31:43 AM
Done in two.
 
2014-02-23 11:33:08 AM
Didn't we already discredit this 'study' ?
 
2014-02-23 11:33:13 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: Maybe more people would understand it if scientists stopped using big words like "heliocentric" when asking these survey questions.


THIS. I simply refuse to believe that a quarter of Americans actually believe that the Sun goes 'round the Earth, but instead I suspect they were confused by the question's phrasing. Anybody have a link to the actual survey?
 
2014-02-23 11:45:48 AM
media.chick.com
 
2014-02-23 11:46:16 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: Maybe more people would understand it if scientists stopped using big words like "heliocentric" when asking these survey questions.


One day me speak pretty?
 
2014-02-23 11:47:56 AM

Marcus Aurelius: The moon is smaller than the earth, but it's farther away.


Ah, go on, Ted.
img.fark.net
 
2014-02-23 11:49:06 AM

Stone Meadow: AverageAmericanGuy: Maybe more people would understand it if scientists stopped using big words like "heliocentric" when asking these survey questions.

THIS. I simply refuse to believe that a quarter of Americans actually believe that the Sun goes 'round the Earth, but instead I suspect they were confused by the question's phrasing. Anybody have a link to the actual survey?


ALSO.

I can build a survey that will make most people fail too :

1. Does the sun rise?
2. Does the sun set? 

Wrong answer: "yes"

Right answer "No, the earth rotates, and as the various faces turn towards and away from the sun we perceive the sun moving through the sky, even though it is we who are moving."
 
2014-02-23 11:49:20 AM

Stone Meadow: AverageAmericanGuy: Maybe more people would understand it if scientists stopped using big words like "heliocentric" when asking these survey questions.

THIS. I simply refuse to believe that a quarter of Americans actually believe that the Sun goes 'round the Earth, but instead I suspect they were confused by the question's phrasing. Anybody have a link to the actual survey?


I have a hard time with this stat, too. Unfounded faith in people, I suppose.
From a personal sampling point of view, I don't know or have never met anyone that I knew did not believe the Earth orbited the sun-let alone one in every four. Not even the super religious members of my family or the really not but didn't believe in dinosaurs tease that I wasted a couple months on 15 years ago.
 
2014-02-23 03:29:13 PM

AverageAmericanGuy: Maybe more people would understand it if scientists stopped using big words like "heliocentric" when asking these survey questions.


For what it's worth the survey question's actual phrasing doesn't use the word "heliocentric".

LesserEvil: My sample might be admittedly low, only a few hundred people, but not a single one thinks the sun orbits the earth. Not one.


Did you take care to make sure your sample was statistically representative of all non-incarcerated individuals in the US, and explicitly ask them? Or are you confusing your personal circle of acquaintance is thus representative, and/or presumptively inferring their non-ignorance without empirical investigation?

LesserEvil: This "study" is complete bulls hit.


The study is from NORC's General Social Survey of the US. Do you have any basis for inferring that completeness, other than the nausea which the results induce in you?

Stone Meadow: THIS. I simply refuse to believe that a quarter of Americans actually believe that the Sun goes 'round the Earth, but instead I suspect they were confused by the question's phrasing.


It's more accurately like one-in-five to one-in-six, since there's also about one-in-fourteen who answer "I don't know" or don't give any coherent answer at all.

Stone Meadow: Anybody have a link to the actual survey?


You can play with the data using the on-line tool at the Berkeley SDA website. The variable is EARTHSUN (one of a series of around a dozen questions regarding basic science knowledge), asked in the 2006, 2008, 2010, and 2012 survey years.

Your_Huckleberry: From a personal sampling point of view, I don't know or have never met anyone that I knew did not believe the Earth orbited the sun-let alone one in every four.


Again, how many people that you've met have you asked that of? (And why the hell do you ask that sort of question of people you meet?) Are they mostly folk your own age, or older? Are they mostly whites with college degrees from the Pacific US states, or do you also know a lot of black high-school dropouts from the derp south?
 
2014-02-23 04:16:35 PM

abb3w: Stone Meadow: I simply refuse to believe that a quarter of Americans actually believe that the Sun goes 'round the Earth, but instead I suspect they were confused by the question's phrasing.

It's more accurately like one-in-five to one-in-six, since there's also about one-in-fourteen who answer "I don't know" or don't give any coherent answer at all.


Yes...*some* will answer incorrectly, and I guess I could even accept that 1 in 6 might do so from never having learned anything at all about our solar system. After all, half the population is dumber than average, and average ain't too bright, so yeah, I can see 1 in 6 or so being THAT stupid.

But not a quarter... ;^)
 
2014-02-23 04:31:04 PM

Stone Meadow: After all, half the population is dumber than average, and average ain't too bright, so yeah, I can see 1 in 6 or so being THAT stupid.


FWIW, aggregating over the four times the GSS asked the question, among those with WORDSUM-measured intelligence below median, about one-in-three answered that the sun went around the earth; median intelligence, one-in-five; and above-median, one-in-ten.

Not that WORDSUM is a perfect measure of intelligence, of course; but it correlates pretty well to other metrics.
 
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