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(Bloomberg)   Number of U.S. farms falls 4.3%. Apparently the survey was done before the recent jump in young people getting into the agriculture business in Colorado and Washington   (bloomberg.com) divider line 10
    More: Fail, Colorado, U.S., U.S. farms, youths, United States Department of Agriculture, farming, decline  
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301 clicks; posted to Business » on 22 Feb 2014 at 11:21 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



10 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-02-22 08:55:30 AM  
Farmin' ain't easy but it's necessary...
 
2014-02-22 10:06:45 AM  
Funny headline, but I hear that is not what is going on. A "friend" of mine, whom has never held legal employment, sings like a canary after you buy her a few Kir Royales. She tells me that most of the newly legal agricultural products trafficked into Colorado and Washington come from Northern California growers.
 
2014-02-22 10:37:46 AM  
If only they'd include all those hippy, doofus, urban farmers the number would have increased.  It's really all a matter of perspective.
 
2014-02-22 11:26:51 AM  
Half of California is fallow. Does that lower it? Or with above comments mean it is a wash?
 
2014-02-22 11:30:36 AM  

Delay: Funny headline, but I hear that is not what is going on. A "friend" of mine, whom has never held legal employment, sings like a canary after you buy her a few Kir Royales. She tells me that most of the newly legal agricultural products trafficked into Colorado and Washington come from Northern California growers.


I suspect most of ours is actually grown indoors or comes from BC.
 
2014-02-22 11:51:48 AM  
That's okay. Because others will follow and take over their hard work. Simple farmers. People of the land. The common clay of the new America.

You know. Monsanto.
 
2014-02-22 12:38:45 PM  
Okay, so retiring farmers are selling their land to younger farmers, who are slowly accumulating more acres to farm. Doesn't seem to be much of a mystery here.
 
2014-02-22 02:19:07 PM  

Stone Meadow: Okay, so retiring farmers are selling their land to younger farmers, who are slowly accumulating more acres to farm. Doesn't seem to be much of a mystery here.


Yup.

I grew up on a farm of about 350 acres. That's tiny by today's standards but back then it was large enough to make a decent living and support a family. Now, where I grew up, the average farm is several thousand acres. The size and efficiency of modern farming equipment (along with other technologies like GPS and specialized computer software) makes it possible for a few people to operate a farm that size. It's actually difficult to make a decent profit on a small farm due to costs associated with equipment upkeep and manpower.
 
2014-02-22 03:00:26 PM  

Winning: Stone Meadow: Okay, so retiring farmers are selling their land to younger farmers, who are slowly accumulating more acres to farm. Doesn't seem to be much of a mystery here.

Yup.

I grew up on a farm of about 350 acres. That's tiny by today's standards but back then it was large enough to make a decent living and support a family. Now, where I grew up, the average farm is several thousand acres. The size and efficiency of modern farming equipment (along with other technologies like GPS and specialized computer software) makes it possible for a few people to operate a farm that size. It's actually difficult to make a decent profit on a small farm due to costs associated with equipment upkeep and manpower.


Yeah. I became friends with a local farmer while stationed at Altus AFB in SW Oklahoma some years ago. He had inherited about 300 acres from his dad in the 70's, and began acquiring acreage from neighboring farmers as they started retiring, and by the mid 90's had about 3000 acres. That was enough to provide him and his adult son (with a family of his own) and one full-time hired hand with comfortable livings. He made the same points about equipment...you need a certain minimum acreage to have it make economic sense. Go big or get out.
 
hej
2014-02-23 11:24:52 AM  

Delay: Funny headline, but I hear that is not what is going on. A "friend" of mine, whom has never held legal employment, sings like a canary after you buy her a few Kir Royales. She tells me that most of the newly legal agricultural products trafficked into Colorado and Washington come from Northern California growers.


Well, that's all the proof I need.
 
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