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(New York Daily News)   If you've got the railway's permission to shoot a movie scene on their bridge, you'd better make really, really sure you really, really have their permission   (nydailynews.com) divider line 39
    More: Sad, Gregg Allman, Midnight Rider, crew members, Eliza Dushku, Crew member killed, CSX, biopic, William Hurt  
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4928 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 22 Feb 2014 at 7:50 AM (27 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



39 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-02-22 07:54:41 AM
Goodnight funnym..*TRAIN HITS*
 
2014-02-22 07:58:41 AM
standbyme.jpg
 
2014-02-22 08:02:07 AM
classic train dodge
 
2014-02-22 08:08:14 AM
Came for Stand by Me.
 
2014-02-22 08:15:07 AM
when they were surprised by an oncoming freight train.


How the fark are you surprised by something that's probably a mile long, weighs a bazillion pounds and is as loud as...well...a freight train?
 
2014-02-22 08:18:30 AM

abhorrent1: when they were surprised by an oncoming freight train.
How the fark are you surprised by something that's probably a mile long, weighs a bazillion pounds and is as loud as...well...a freight train?


Same reason why people in The Walking Dead are surprised by zombies, seemingly unable to hear them shuffling through leaves, sticks and breathing heavy until they are 2ft away.
 
2014-02-22 08:45:04 AM

abhorrent1: when they were surprised by an oncoming freight train.


How the fark are you surprised by something that's probably a mile long, weighs a bazillion pounds and is as loud as...well...a freight train?


This article provides a little more detail. The trestle is next to a paper mill, which are noisy places. That stretch of track is a busy main line railroad. Relatively high speed (Amtrak uses it). And IF the Variety article is accurate, it sounds like the railroad didn't actually have anyone on site to talk to the train dispatchers, nor did the film company.

It's hindsight, and I wasn't there, AND it's been awhile since I have had to do work near a railroad, but there seems to be lots of potential failures here. Used to be if you knew you were going to work in proximity to or on the actual rail line, you got the railroad to issue a "slow order," and instruct their train crews to sound their bell and horn pretty much continuously, and be prepared to stop

You protect your work site by setting out flares and "torpedoes" in both directions ( I don't know if they still use torpedoes). You either provide your own spotters at least a mile in each direction, with reliable communications to the crew doing the work, or get the railroad to do that.

At this point, I am guessing - speculating really - that the film crew didn't have any experience around trains.

The way the article reads, it sounds like the railroad said "this sounds pretty cool, just listen for the horn and be careful." A little knowledge is  a dangerous things, but I know a little about both trains and film. I'd have been asking the film director for his shot list, and said, "hmm, a mattress on the train tracks.... film crew on the trestle...we need to talk."
 
2014-02-22 08:53:36 AM

Unobtanium: That stretch of track is a busy main line railroad. Relatively high speed (Amtrak uses it).


If it was an Amtrak going 70-80 mph I could maybe understand. But it says it was a freight train. How fast would a train that could be up to 20K tons be moving?
 
2014-02-22 09:06:02 AM

Unobtanium:

The way the article reads, it sounds like the railroad said "this sounds pretty cool, just listen for the horn and be careful." A little knowledge is  a dangerous things, but I know a little about both trains and film. I'd have been asking the film director for his shot list, and said, "hmm, a mattress on the train tracks.... film crew on the trestle...we need to talk."



An update claims they didn't have permission to be on the tracks.

"Joe Gardner, the lead detective on the case, said the crew had Rayonier's permission to film on its property next to the train tracks.

"CSX has told me they were aware they were out there, but they did not have permission to be on the train tracks," Gardner told reporters.
"


You'd think that common sense would get you to at the very least post someone a few miles down the track in each direction with radios, and do a radio check every few minutes.
This wasn't some student film, this was, according to the comments, a full union shoot.
 
2014-02-22 09:15:13 AM

Unobtanium: abhorrent1: when they were surprised by an oncoming freight train.


How the fark are you surprised by something that's probably a mile long, weighs a bazillion pounds and is as loud as...well...a freight train?

This article provides a little more detail. The trestle is next to a paper mill, which are noisy places. That stretch of track is a busy main line railroad. Relatively high speed (Amtrak uses it). And IF the Variety article is accurate, it sounds like the railroad didn't actually have anyone on site to talk to the train dispatchers, nor did the film company.

It's hindsight, and I wasn't there, AND it's been awhile since I have had to do work near a railroad, but there seems to be lots of potential failures here. Used to be if you knew you were going to work in proximity to or on the actual rail line, you got the railroad to issue a "slow order," and instruct their train crews to sound their bell and horn pretty much continuously, and be prepared to stop

You protect your work site by setting out flares and "torpedoes" in both directions ( I don't know if they still use torpedoes). You either provide your own spotters at least a mile in each direction, with reliable communications to the crew doing the work, or get the railroad to do that.

At this point, I am guessing - speculating really - that the film crew didn't have any experience around trains.

The way the article reads, it sounds like the railroad said "this sounds pretty cool, just listen for the horn and be careful." A little knowledge is  a dangerous things, but I know a little about both trains and film. I'd have been asking the film director for his shot list, and said, "hmm, a mattress on the train tracks.... film crew on the trestle...we need to talk."


TL;DR Occupational Health and Safety case study number 45772433-A
 
2014-02-22 09:17:49 AM
Morons vs. Darwin riding a train.
 
2014-02-22 09:34:23 AM
I wonder what was going through her mind when it happened?
 
2014-02-22 09:43:42 AM

Unobtanium: At this point, I am guessing - speculating really - that the film crew didn't have any experience around trains.


Well, they do now.
 
2014-02-22 09:45:58 AM

Gunderson: I wonder what was going through her mind when it happened?


30 tons of wheat
20 Mazda CX-7's
125 rolls of industrial steel

Some of the other cars were in transit and left empty.
 
2014-02-22 09:56:14 AM
i can't believe they were trying to film on a train track that was still in use.  aren't there plenty of abandoned old rail lines out there that don't have trains on them anymore?  i'm pretty sure there are even railroad bridges that no longer see train traffic.  why didn't they film the scenes there?
 
2014-02-22 10:01:12 AM

abhorrent1: Unobtanium: That stretch of track is a busy main line railroad. Relatively high speed (Amtrak uses it).

If it was an Amtrak going 70-80 mph I could maybe understand. But it says it was a freight train. How fast would a train that could be up to 20K tons be moving?


Easily 50 or 60 mph. I didn't spend a lot of time trying to Google what the speed limit is in that area.
 
2014-02-22 10:03:41 AM

Flint Ironstag: Unobtanium:

The way the article reads, it sounds like the railroad said "this sounds pretty cool, just listen for the horn and be careful." A little knowledge is  a dangerous things, but I know a little about both trains and film. I'd have been asking the film director for his shot list, and said, "hmm, a mattress on the train tracks.... film crew on the trestle...we need to talk."


An update claims they didn't have permission to be on the tracks.

"Joe Gardner, the lead detective on the case, said the crew had Rayonier's permission to film on its property next to the train tracks.

"CSX has told me they were aware they were out there, but they did not have permission to be on the train tracks," Gardner told reporters."


You'd think that common sense would get you to at the very least post someone a few miles down the track in each direction with radios, and do a radio check every few minutes.
This wasn't some student film, this was, according to the comments, a full union shoot.


Yeah, this was not a group of students from SCAD. If this article is accurate, that would explain a lot.
 
2014-02-22 10:03:46 AM

Flint Ironstag: Unobtanium:

The way the article reads, it sounds like the railroad said "this sounds pretty cool, just listen for the horn and be careful." A little knowledge is  a dangerous things, but I know a little about both trains and film. I'd have been asking the film director for his shot list, and said, "hmm, a mattress on the train tracks.... film crew on the trestle...we need to talk."


An update claims they didn't have permission to be on the tracks.

"Joe Gardner, the lead detective on the case, said the crew had Rayonier's permission to film on its property next to the train tracks.

"CSX has told me they were aware they were out there, but they did not have permission to be on the train tracks," Gardner told reporters."


You'd think that common sense would get you to at the very least post someone a few miles down the track in each direction with radios, and do a radio check every few minutes.
This wasn't some student film, this was, according to the comments, a full union shoot.


Clearly, Unions are the problem.
 
2014-02-22 10:14:52 AM

abhorrent1: when they were surprised by an oncoming freight train.


How the fark are you surprised by something that's probably a mile long, weighs a bazillion pounds and is as loud as...well...a freight train?


I did a land survey that included railroad tracks. Between the highway on one side and the lumberyard on the other no, you can't always hear a freight train coming.
 
2014-02-22 10:15:12 AM
CSX isn't the most safety concerned rail company. They have a shiatty rep.
 
2014-02-22 10:28:32 AM
 no one should ever enjoy anything
 
2014-02-22 10:48:25 AM
After reading the article I wonder if there wasn't some sort of massive fark-up where somebody called the railroad company and got permission to film around the tracks, and relayed the info back to the film crew, where someone somehow passed on this information as meaning that the trains would be stopped and they were free to film wherever they wanted on and around the trestle. Otherwise I can't imagine that they would be so irresponsible as to lay large objects on the train tracks, or that an entire professional film crew would go along with something so obviously incredibly dangerous as walking out onto an elevated trestle when a train might come through.

So yeah, I'm guessing fark-up in communication among the movie crew.
 
2014-02-22 11:04:13 AM

styckx: CSX isn't the most safety concerned rail company. They have a shiatty rep.


This. It was totally, TOTALLY the railroads fault. Had they been elsewhere and on a UP or BNSF mailine, this wouldn't have happened.
 
2014-02-22 11:08:49 AM
Also the woman who was killed died when the train apparently hit a goddamn framed bed they had put onto the tracks and she was struck by a piece of the flying debris and fell down. How the fark does something like that happen?
 
2014-02-22 11:14:50 AM
Super 8
 
2014-02-22 11:24:09 AM

Need_MindBleach: Also the woman who was killed died when the train apparently hit a goddamn framed bed they had put onto the tracks and she was struck by a piece of the flying debris and fell down. How the fark does something like that happen?


They put the bed between their filming position and their escape route. Train was coming from that direction. Train hits bed at a high speed, and it comes apart. Sounds like they were trying to get their equipment and props off the track as well as themselves.
 
2014-02-22 11:37:10 AM

Unobtanium: Need_MindBleach: Also the woman who was killed died when the train apparently hit a goddamn framed bed they had put onto the tracks and she was struck by a piece of the flying debris and fell down. How the fark does something like that happen?

They put the bed between their filming position and their escape route. Train was coming from that direction. Train hits bed at a high speed, and it comes apart. Sounds like they were trying to get their equipment and props off the track as well as themselves.


It's a middle school math problem.  If the train is moving 90 feet/second and you can run 15 feet/second without your camera or 7 feet/second with your camera just how stupid are you to be standing in the middle of a trestle?
 
2014-02-22 12:17:08 PM
I hope they had workers comp.
 
2014-02-22 12:41:31 PM

Gunderson: I wonder what was going through her mind when it happened?


The train.
 
2014-02-22 12:49:27 PM

Need_MindBleach: Also the woman who was killed died when the train apparently hit a goddamn framed bed they had put onto the tracks and she was struck by a piece of the flying debris and fell down. How the fark does something like that happen?


cinematichorrorarchive.files.wordpress.com

The rest of them are going to be found dead one-by-one over the coming weeks.
 
2014-02-22 02:44:13 PM
RoxtarRyan Same reason why people in The Walking Dead are surprised by zombies, seemingly unable to hear them shuffling through leaves, sticks and breathing heavy until they are 2ft away.

Woman killed was Walking Dead" crewmember.  If a scene is that elaborate, I don't see why they don't film @ a Railroad Museum like Orange Empire or Fillmore & Western Railway(EVERY LA-based film scene that involves stunts & trains is shot @ the F&W, Back 2 The Future, "24", whatever)-the museum in Snoqualamie has a bridge like that, instead of using a mainline bridge with heavy freights bound for the Port Of Savannah they're blocking their own Escape Route with their prop bed? WTF?  http://www.intwinpeaks.com/2009/03/real-trestle-bridge.html
Plus if it's a period dream sequence the Museum would have actual locomotives that would match the era, dunno why they can't CGI it(one source sez it was just a camera test!)
 
2014-02-22 06:24:51 PM
No kind of love
No kind of love
 
2014-02-22 10:19:04 PM
When i was a kid, a friend and I walked down some tracks to get the movie and video game rental place, on the walk back i looked up and noticed lights over my track was on a way way down the track. The one over my friends track was off, i thought that was odd. At the same time he must have heard the train behind me and turned around to look. I did not hear anything until it was like right there and the horn blared.
 
2014-02-22 10:38:19 PM
"CSX: Moving yesterday's freight, tomorrow."
 
2014-02-22 10:58:17 PM

styckx: CSX isn't the most safety concerned rail company. They have a shiatty rep.


I've heard as many bad stories about the chicken shiat express as the next guy, but placing a set on live rails is such an inherently bad idea that I have a hard time not putting most of the blame on the film company in this one.   I guess we shall wait and see what the final investigation turns up...
 
2014-02-22 11:07:19 PM

Mr. Eugenides: Unobtanium: Need_MindBleach: Also the woman who was killed died when the train apparently hit a goddamn framed bed they had put onto the tracks and she was struck by a piece of the flying debris and fell down. How the fark does something like that happen?

They put the bed between their filming position and their escape route. Train was coming from that direction. Train hits bed at a high speed, and it comes apart. Sounds like they were trying to get their equipment and props off the track as well as themselves.

It's a middle school math problem.  If the train is moving 90 feet/second and you can run 15 feet/second without your camera or 7 feet/second with your camera just how stupid are you to be standing in the middle of a trestle?


Crew members are replaceable but do you know how much panavision charges for a single scratch when you turn the camera back in.
 
2014-02-23 12:58:44 AM

RoxtarRyan: abhorrent1: when they were surprised by an oncoming freight train.
How the fark are you surprised by something that's probably a mile long, weighs a bazillion pounds and is as loud as...well...a freight train?

Same reason why people in The Walking Dead are surprised by zombies, seemingly unable to hear them shuffling through leaves, sticks and breathing heavy until they are 2ft away.


This pisses me off everytime. They also have an "off" mode where they will make no noise and stand still in an unscene area or behind a door.
 
2014-02-23 10:25:01 AM
What's the problem? Change the "dream" sequence into a "nightmare" sequence and keep shooting. It's what the Allmans would have wanted.


/Lemonade......
 
2014-02-23 04:53:39 PM
First day of filming.

Things can only get better from this point.
 
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