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(Huffington Post)   Forty-one ways your childhood could have been irrevocably altered   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 59
    More: Interesting, Marge Simpson, Maurice Sendak, console wars, Matt Groening, Shigeru Miyamoto, Joker, Cookie Monster, Chris Farley  
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10808 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Feb 2014 at 3:53 AM (21 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-02-21 11:55:03 PM
Dave Arneson never met Gary Gygax or I wasn't afraid of the the table saw?
 
2014-02-21 11:57:58 PM
If that strange old man hadn't moved in across the street?
 
2014-02-22 12:05:00 AM
If the Cowardly Lion had been given a pair of brass balls instead of a medal?
 
2014-02-22 12:09:39 AM
and HuffPo succumbs to BuzzFeed just like that.
 
2014-02-22 02:11:29 AM
I'm pretty sure I wouldn't have been seriously affected by Inspector Gadget having some facial hair.
 
2014-02-22 02:38:59 AM

ekdikeo4: I'm pretty sure I wouldn't have been seriously affected by Inspector Gadget having some facial hair.


It might have tickled a little.

/Wait, that wasn't Inspetor Gadget?
 
2014-02-22 03:18:20 AM
If I had actually watched H.R. Puff'N'Stuff on a colour TV instead of a 12 inch Electrohome B&W?
 
2014-02-22 03:29:25 AM
42. Mom chokes on cake at your 3rd birthday, the med student doing clown work rushes over and gives her the heimlich, saving her life. She cries in relief. You forget. When you hit puberty: sudden nightmares of clown rape.
 
2014-02-22 04:05:15 AM
Hawaiian Punch was a floor wax? Huh.
 
2014-02-22 04:06:39 AM
If my teacher hadn't touched me?
 
2014-02-22 04:12:16 AM
i.dailymail.co.uk
 
2014-02-22 04:14:03 AM

ImpendingCynic: Hawaiian Punch was a floor wax? Huh.


You mean a dessert topping!
 
2014-02-22 04:14:12 AM
"Being raised by squirrels" somehow missing...
 
2014-02-22 04:25:35 AM

1a. Oscar the Grouch was ORANGE in the first Sesame Street season (1969):



mentalfloss.com
 
2014-02-22 04:37:53 AM
I was interested til i got to the part about monopoly.  It is fictitious, there are similarities, however there were many games that were created at the turn of the century(as well as during the depression) which looked just like it.  The actual game play is completely different. the  "truth" presented in that article is alot less interesting then the actual story of monopoly.
 
2014-02-22 05:30:49 AM

lohphat: 1a. Oscar the Grouch was ORANGE in the first Sesame Street season (1969):


img.fark.net

"biatch, I live i a farkin garbage can. I'm the poorest motherfarker on Sesame Street!"
 
2014-02-22 06:03:02 AM
I'm old enough that our first Mr. Potato-head really was a potato.  We'd play with it for a while, then it would get peeled and boiled to death - just like all the vegetables that came into Mom's kitchen.  Sometimes we'd use a rutabaga.  They were a lot harder to poke those facial features into.

I much preferred the Erector set and Lincoln logs.  As the only son in the family until little brother showed up when I was 14, my sisters never wanted to play with those and left me alone.  Being the only grandson on the wealthier side of the family for all those years, I was spoiled and had multiple sets of each.  I could build anything I could imagine.
 
2014-02-22 06:30:57 AM

Mr. Right: I'm old enough that our first Mr. Potato-head really was a potato. We'd play with it for a while, then it would get peeled and boiled to death - just like all the vegetables that came into Mom's kitchen.  Sometimes we'd use a rutabaga.  They were a lot harder to poke those facial features into.

I much preferred the Erector set and Lincoln logs.  As the only son in the family until little brother showed up when I was 14, my sisters never wanted to play with those and left me alone.  Being the only grandson on the wealthier side of the family for all those years, I was spoiled and had multiple sets of each.  I could build anything I could imagine.


I was going to comment on this part of the article - I had this conversation with my wife a couple of months ago - I was born in 1965 and I remember using real potatoes and she does too.  of course, those were the days when mom bought a twenty pound bag of potatoes.   And yes, Mr. potatoehead always had a slow painful death.   Anyway, I thought the plastic version came along in the 70's *shrug*
 
2014-02-22 06:34:56 AM

SwingDancer: I was interested til i got to the part about monopoly.  It is fictitious, there are similarities, however there were many games that were created at the turn of the century(as well as during the depression) which looked just like it.  The actual game play is completely different. the  "truth" presented in that article is alot less interesting then the actual story of monopoly.


I think there were several of the points in the article that were just myths.
 
2014-02-22 06:37:27 AM

ekdikeo4: SwingDancer: I was interested til i got to the part about monopoly.  It is fictitious, there are similarities, however there were many games that were created at the turn of the century(as well as during the depression) which looked just like it.  The actual game play is completely different. the  "truth" presented in that article is alot less interesting then the actual story of monopoly.

I think there were several of the points in the article that were just myths.


The whole angle this 'article' presented has been covered in many before it. They all emphasize how a poor, poor woman was cheated by a large patriarchal company. Jezebel bullshiat.
 
2014-02-22 06:43:38 AM

riverwalk barfly: Mr. Right: I'm old enough that our first Mr. Potato-head really was a potato. We'd play with it for a while, then it would get peeled and boiled to death - just like all the vegetables that came into Mom's kitchen.  Sometimes we'd use a rutabaga.  They were a lot harder to poke those facial features into.

I much preferred the Erector set and Lincoln logs.  As the only son in the family until little brother showed up when I was 14, my sisters never wanted to play with those and left me alone.  Being the only grandson on the wealthier side of the family for all those years, I was spoiled and had multiple sets of each.  I could build anything I could imagine.

I was going to comment on this part of the article - I had this conversation with my wife a couple of months ago - I was born in 1965 and I remember using real potatoes and she does too.  of course, those were the days when mom bought a twenty pound bag of potatoes.   And yes, Mr. potatoehead always had a slow painful death.   Anyway, I thought the plastic version came along in the 70's *shrug*


Ditto, but even older- born in 1955. Real potatoes made the toy a lot more interesting; by the time my kids were born it was the plastic potatoes, with only a set number of ways you could stick them together.
 
2014-02-22 06:57:59 AM
Wow that was awful. Well, I think it was since I couldn't make past the first two or three
 
2014-02-22 07:00:54 AM

Sass-O-Rev: riverwalk barfly: Mr. Right: I'm old enough that our first Mr. Potato-head really was a potato. We'd play with it for a while, then it would get peeled and boiled to death - just like all the vegetables that came into Mom's kitchen.  Sometimes we'd use a rutabaga.  They were a lot harder to poke those facial features into.

I much preferred the Erector set and Lincoln logs.  As the only son in the family until little brother showed up when I was 14, my sisters never wanted to play with those and left me alone.  Being the only grandson on the wealthier side of the family for all those years, I was spoiled and had multiple sets of each.  I could build anything I could imagine.

I was going to comment on this part of the article - I had this conversation with my wife a couple of months ago - I was born in 1965 and I remember using real potatoes and she does too.  of course, those were the days when mom bought a twenty pound bag of potatoes.   And yes, Mr. potatoehead always had a slow painful death.   Anyway, I thought the plastic version came along in the 70's *shrug*

Ditto, but even older- born in 1955. Real potatoes made the toy a lot more interesting; by the time my kids were born it was the plastic potatoes, with only a set number of ways you could stick them together.


The features we would stick into the real potatoes had very sharp points. Leaving them on floor to get stepped on was part of the fun.

Sometimes we'd play cowboys and Indians with Mr. Potato Head, using yams for the Indians.  In the end, they all ended up in the stewpot.
 
2014-02-22 07:03:01 AM
Not clicking on a buzzfeed link...
 
2014-02-22 07:11:02 AM
If The Baroness had been The Baron my involuntary erections at the sight of long black hair and glasses would be even harder to explain away.
 
2014-02-22 07:23:52 AM

Sass-O-Rev: riverwalk barfly: Mr. Right: I'm old enough that our first Mr. Potato-head really was a potato. We'd play with it for a while, then it would get peeled and boiled to death - just like all the vegetables that came into Mom's kitchen.  Sometimes we'd use a rutabaga.  They were a lot harder to poke those facial features into.

I much preferred the Erector set and Lincoln logs.  As the only son in the family until little brother showed up when I was 14, my sisters never wanted to play with those and left me alone.  Being the only grandson on the wealthier side of the family for all those years, I was spoiled and had multiple sets of each.  I could build anything I could imagine.

I was going to comment on this part of the article - I had this conversation with my wife a couple of months ago - I was born in 1965 and I remember using real potatoes and she does too.  of course, those were the days when mom bought a twenty pound bag of potatoes.   And yes, Mr. potatoehead always had a slow painful death.   Anyway, I thought the plastic version came along in the 70's *shrug*

Ditto, but even older- born in 1955. Real potatoes made the toy a lot more interesting; by the time my kids were born it was the plastic potatoes, with only a set number of ways you could stick them together.


After we tired of Mr. Potato Head, we'd switch to using the potato as a spud gun ammo source or making a stamp out of it. Potatoes were my generation's X-Box.

/Get off my lawn or I'll throw horribly mutilated potatoes at you
 
2014-02-22 07:29:00 AM

Sass-O-Rev: riverwalk barfly: Mr. Right: I'm old enough that our first Mr. Potato-head really was a potato. We'd play with it for a while, then it would get peeled and boiled to death - just like all the vegetables that came into Mom's kitchen.  Sometimes we'd use a rutabaga.  They were a lot harder to poke those facial features into.

I much preferred the Erector set and Lincoln logs.  As the only son in the family until little brother showed up when I was 14, my sisters never wanted to play with those and left me alone.  Being the only grandson on the wealthier side of the family for all those years, I was spoiled and had multiple sets of each.  I could build anything I could imagine.

I was going to comment on this part of the article - I had this conversation with my wife a couple of months ago - I was born in 1965 and I remember using real potatoes and she does too.  of course, those were the days when mom bought a twenty pound bag of potatoes.   And yes, Mr. potatoehead always had a slow painful death.   Anyway, I thought the plastic version came along in the 70's *shrug*

Ditto, but even older- born in 1955. Real potatoes made the toy a lot more interesting; by the time my kids were born it was the plastic potatoes, with only a set number of ways you could stick them together.


There is a societal bend to that statement.
 
2014-02-22 07:29:09 AM

riverwalk barfly: Mr. Right: I'm old enough that our first Mr. Potato-head really was a potato. We'd play with it for a while, then it would get peeled and boiled to death - just like all the vegetables that came into Mom's kitchen.  Sometimes we'd use a rutabaga.  They were a lot harder to poke those facial features into.

I much preferred the Erector set and Lincoln logs.  As the only son in the family until little brother showed up when I was 14, my sisters never wanted to play with those and left me alone.  Being the only grandson on the wealthier side of the family for all those years, I was spoiled and had multiple sets of each.  I could build anything I could imagine.

I was going to comment on this part of the article - I had this conversation with my wife a couple of months ago - I was born in 1965 and I remember using real potatoes and she does too.  of course, those were the days when mom bought a twenty pound bag of potatoes.   And yes, Mr. potatoehead always had a slow painful death.   Anyway, I thought the plastic version came along in the 70's *shrug*


I grew up in the late 50s - early 60s and only ever knew the "real potato potato-heads".  I remember the one my kids had (70s) was plastic but I "lost touch" with the potato-head family in the intervening years.
 
2014-02-22 07:39:37 AM
A bunch of that stuff happened after I was a kid, a lot of the rest I just didn't care about.
 
2014-02-22 07:40:32 AM
That original 3 musketeers bar sounds delicious!
 
2014-02-22 07:47:27 AM

CK2005: That original 3 musketeers bar sounds delicious!


I agree.  If they were like that, I'd probably not hate them.
 
2014-02-22 07:50:42 AM

oukewldave: CK2005: That original 3 musketeers bar sounds delicious!

I agree.  If they were like that, I'd probably not hate them.


I'm surprised they haven't thought of bringing them back as a limited special occasion item maybe tied to a holiday.
 
2014-02-22 07:50:44 AM
I knew it! Johnny Cage was supposed to be Bloodsport!

Also that is a gorgeous John Candy turkey.  Is it actually art that never made it? Or just some crappy journalism?
 
2014-02-22 08:15:05 AM

Sass-O-Rev: riverwalk barfly: Mr. Right: I'm old enough that our first Mr. Potato-head really was a potato. We'd play with it for a while, then it would get peeled and boiled to death - just like all the vegetables that came into Mom's kitchen.  Sometimes we'd use a rutabaga.  They were a lot harder to poke those facial features into.

I much preferred the Erector set and Lincoln logs.  As the only son in the family until little brother showed up when I was 14, my sisters never wanted to play with those and left me alone.  Being the only grandson on the wealthier side of the family for all those years, I was spoiled and had multiple sets of each.  I could build anything I could imagine.

I was going to comment on this part of the article - I had this conversation with my wife a couple of months ago - I was born in 1965 and I remember using real potatoes and she does too.  of course, those were the days when mom bought a twenty pound bag of potatoes.   And yes, Mr. potatoehead always had a slow painful death.   Anyway, I thought the plastic version came along in the 70's *shrug*

Ditto, but even older- born in 1955. Real potatoes made the toy a lot more interesting; by the time my kids were born it was the plastic potatoes, with only a set number of ways you could stick them together.


I'm also old enough for the real potato. I'd love the way they disfigured as the rot set in.
 
2014-02-22 08:18:57 AM
Missing from the list: if mom had stopped drinking/shopping up all the living expenses and moved us out of that shiat cabin in the woods.
 
2014-02-22 08:22:18 AM
When I was a kid, Mr. Potatohead was a rock, and we had to use a hammer and chisel to make his faces....
 
2014-02-22 08:27:52 AM
Many of these are not my childhood. How the fark old are you? I was coming here because I assumed commenters were more my demographic. But this headline getting through makes me question everything. Everything but my childhood.
 
2014-02-22 08:39:47 AM

AlanSmithee: Sass-O-Rev: riverwalk barfly: Mr. Right: I'm old enough that our first Mr. Potato-head really was a potato. We'd play with it for a while, then it would get peeled and boiled to death - just like all the vegetables that came into Mom's kitchen.  Sometimes we'd use a rutabaga.  They were a lot harder to poke those facial features into.

I much preferred the Erector set and Lincoln logs.  As the only son in the family until little brother showed up when I was 14, my sisters never wanted to play with those and left me alone.  Being the only grandson on the wealthier side of the family for all those years, I was spoiled and had multiple sets of each.  I could build anything I could imagine.

I was going to comment on this part of the article - I had this conversation with my wife a couple of months ago - I was born in 1965 and I remember using real potatoes and she does too.  of course, those were the days when mom bought a twenty pound bag of potatoes.   And yes, Mr. potatoehead always had a slow painful death.   Anyway, I thought the plastic version came along in the 70's *shrug*

Ditto, but even older- born in 1955. Real potatoes made the toy a lot more interesting; by the time my kids were born it was the plastic potatoes, with only a set number of ways you could stick them together.

I'm also old enough for the real potato. I'd love the way they disfigured as the rot set in.


I am glad I am not the only one demanding that kids get off my lawn.


/Always saw Mr. Wilson as a role model.
 
2014-02-22 09:36:40 AM
I'd have loved it to be The Whoopass Girls, but I'm sure there are parents who are glad they changed it.
 
2014-02-22 09:53:02 AM

Gramma: Sass-O-Rev: riverwalk barfly: Mr. Right: I'm old enough that our first Mr. Potato-head really was a potato. We'd play with it for a while, then it would get peeled and boiled to death - just like all the vegetables that came into Mom's kitchen.  Sometimes we'd use a rutabaga.  They were a lot harder to poke those facial features into.

I much preferred the Erector set and Lincoln logs.  As the only son in the family until little brother showed up when I was 14, my sisters never wanted to play with those and left me alone.  Being the only grandson on the wealthier side of the family for all those years, I was spoiled and had multiple sets of each.  I could build anything I could imagine.

I was going to comment on this part of the article - I had this conversation with my wife a couple of months ago - I was born in 1965 and I remember using real potatoes and she does too.  of course, those were the days when mom bought a twenty pound bag of potatoes.   And yes, Mr. potatoehead always had a slow painful death.   Anyway, I thought the plastic version came along in the 70's *shrug*

Ditto, but even older- born in 1955. Real potatoes made the toy a lot more interesting; by the time my kids were born it was the plastic potatoes, with only a set number of ways you could stick them together.

The features we would stick into the real potatoes had very sharp points. Leaving them on floor to get stepped on was part of the fun.

Sometimes we'd play cowboys and Indians with Mr. Potato Head, using yams for the Indians.  In the end, they all ended up in the stewpot.


That's racist!
/At least you didn't use the eggplants for anything.
 
2014-02-22 10:14:49 AM

borg: ImpendingCynic: Hawaiian Punch was a floor wax? Huh.

You mean a dessert topping!


www.tegile.com
Hawaiian Punch was both a floor wax and a dessert topping
 
2014-02-22 10:27:35 AM
Also old enough for a real potato Mr Potato Head. Spent many happy early evenings before dinner sitting on the kitchen floor making funny faces on potatoes until mom confiscated them one by one. Had to have been younger than three, because we moved to Germany when I was three so my parents had to have bought it for me before then.
 
2014-02-22 10:30:29 AM
I remember when Mr. Potato Head was a real potato. Does that mean my childhood was warped?
 
2014-02-22 11:27:27 AM
The only thing I can relate to is the Joker, Superman, and Hawaiian punch. Mr Potatohead as a nonpotato already existed early 1960s.
 
2014-02-22 11:47:23 AM
The Sims" was envisioned as an architecture simulator.


I knew it. I would play that game with my sister. I would play first and build the house, then i would hand the game off to her to play with the characters.

/Architect
 
2014-02-22 11:50:49 AM

lohphat: 1a. Oscar the Grouch was ORANGE in the first Sesame Street season (1969):

[mentalfloss.com image 440x250]


That was before the mold and algae set in.
 
2014-02-22 11:57:31 AM
i.huffpost.com

How much of an a-hole actor must you be to insist that a costumed character must do a hover-hand??
 
2014-02-22 12:03:54 PM
2. The Nintendo 64 and Playstation almost didn't exist as competitors.

i.huffpost.com


Lol.
 
2014-02-22 12:12:29 PM
Here's a couple that that didn't make the list: Warner Brothers had a couple of cartoon concepts in the works but they never made it to Final Approval. One involved Minerva Mink and Newt from Animaniacs, as Space Bounty Hunters. Here's a concept drawing I've kept that a friend of mine who worked at WB leaked over to me way back in the day:

img.fark.net

I think they just retooled the unused scripts and converted them over to be used as scripts for the Duck Dogers series.


The other proposed cartoon concept was even more retarded. Imagine a new Batman animated series, but as Pokemon Trainers. Yes, Batman's utility belt would be a Poke-belt with bat Pokeballs, using Bat-poke-whatevers to fight the Joker or the Riddler who had their own gaggle of critters in their own Poke-belts. I'm not sure this one even got past the approval stage for making a test pilot, with the person who proposed it was taken out behind the dumpster and shot in the back of the head.
 
2014-02-22 12:17:05 PM

Herr Morgenstern: I'd have loved it to be The Whoopass Girls, but I'm sure there are parents who are glad they changed it.


Take a peek into that alternate universe:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=APnZCdiStKI
 
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