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(Stuff.co.nz)   Hospital pumps patient full of morphine, then lets him drive home. What could possibly go wrong?   (stuff.co.nz) divider line 41
    More: Fail, Hospital pumps, morphine, health board, serious adverse events, New Zealand Transport Agency, patients  
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4705 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Feb 2014 at 5:36 PM (22 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



41 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-02-21 05:40:30 PM
I guessed crashing. Yay!

This part is stupid though: "They never should have let him go - frankly, letting someone drive with morphine in their system is the same as giving them cannabis or alcohol," Jackie Anthony said.
 
2014-02-21 05:41:54 PM
He doesn't fix the cable?
 
2014-02-21 05:44:49 PM

Jument: I guessed crashing. Yay!

This part is stupid though: "They never should have let him go - frankly, letting someone drive with morphine in their system is the same as giving them cannabis or alcohol," Jackie Anthony said.


What I get out of that: Aussies have some really killer weed.
 
2014-02-21 05:45:42 PM
Thanks, Obamacare!

/yes, I know
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-02-21 05:49:19 PM
"They never offered to get a cab for him, or put him in an ambulance, or insist he stay overnight. He could have had delayed concussion.

In America an ambulance running as a cab makes a huge profit for somebody (but not the insurance company). In New Zealand it's a cost.
 
2014-02-21 05:49:59 PM
In my early twenties I had roommate and friend who was somewhat on the prep side of things. He knew me and mine liked to smoke and we all sure as hell tied one on together but one day he comes over the neighbors place as we are taking knife hits and decides to do what. Within 30 mins he drove himself to the hospital for an 'anxiety attack' and sure as shiat they just pumped him full of morphine for a few hours. I don't really understand the logic of pumping morphine into a kid that simply took too big a bong hit but I was jealous he had such a better night than me!
 
2014-02-21 05:52:34 PM
They met every Thursday, Thursday, Thursday in the afternoon for a couple of beers and a game of pool?
 
2014-02-21 05:59:56 PM
I don't know what all this DUI hysteria is about. If there's one thing that helps me relax and drive in a more predictable and serene manner it's having a great buzz. Otherwise, it's easy to get distracted and pissed off about bright high-beam lights, stupid endless turn signals, slow drivers who get you stuck at long-ass red lights, pedestrians rushing out from the left and right with no warning into 4-lane roads...I mean it's a f*cking horror show out there. But with a few drinks and a Xanax or two for me and a girl with nice boobs, it's a breeze to cruise along, enjoy the radio and stay safe. I like just popping a couple pills, getting a sixpack, putting down the windows, opening up the moonroof and driving around. It's fun.
 
2014-02-21 06:11:30 PM
Sounds like the concussion and morphine together took him out.

When I have to head to doc-in-a-box or the ER with a severe migraine, and the give me a bare-minimum dose of dilaudid, I'd damn well better have a driver...

Very strange they let him go.
 
2014-02-21 06:28:32 PM
img.fark.net
 
2014-02-21 06:29:16 PM
With respect to the medicate and release,  I can't help but give the hospital the nod.
 
2014-02-21 06:33:25 PM

girlygirlmpls: [img.fark.net image 300x225]


This is what happens when you grow up and find out you can't have both
 
2014-02-21 06:46:38 PM
Hospital pumps patient full of morphine, then lets him drive home. What could possibly go wrong?

He realizes he shouldn't be driving and calls for a ride?

shiat. He drove and crashed?

Well then does he take some responsibility for his actions and realize he shouldn't have driven the car while he was high as a farking kite?

No? Blame the hospital?

Yeah sounds about right. Just like the idiots that sue the bar/bartender when they get drunk and hop behind the wheel.
 
2014-02-21 07:01:09 PM

Mattyb710: Hospital pumps patient full of morphine, then lets him drive home. What could possibly go wrong?

He realizes he shouldn't be driving and calls for a ride?

shiat. He drove and crashed?

Well then does he take some responsibility for his actions and realize he shouldn't have driven the car while he was high as a farking kite?

No? Blame the hospital?

Yeah sounds about right. Just like the idiots that sue the bar/bartender when they get drunk and hop behind the wheel.


Almost as if he was pumped full of a mind altering substance.
 
2014-02-21 07:02:21 PM
They asked him if he wanted to stay and he chose to leave and go home. They have no authority to keep him there. The only fault of the hospital I gather from that is telling him he should be able to drive one-handed. The man should have known better than to drug and drive.
 
2014-02-21 07:03:56 PM

Mithiwithi: Thanks, Obamacare!

/yes, I know


Kangaroocare
 
2014-02-21 07:04:28 PM

Mattyb710: Hospital pumps patient full of morphine, then lets him drive home. What could possibly go wrong?

He realizes he shouldn't be driving and calls for a ride?

shiat. He drove and crashed?

Well then does he take some responsibility for his actions and realize he shouldn't have driven the car while he was high as a farking kite?

No? Blame the hospital?

Yeah sounds about right. Just like the idiots that sue the bar/bartender when they get drunk and hop behind the wheel.



Except, this guy was given drugs from a hospital for pain he had after hitting his head.  Both the drugs and the head-hitting likely combined to create a very predictable outcome -- the patient would be totally unfit to drive a vehicle.  All hospitals I know require you have another person who will be driving you home before they'll even release you.
 
2014-02-21 07:15:45 PM

Babe Ruthless: Except, this guy was given drugs from a hospital for pain he had after hitting his head.  Both the drugs and the head-hitting likely combined to create a very predictable outcome -- the patient would be totally unfit to drive a vehicle.  All hospitals I know require you have another person who will be driving you home before they'll even release you.


In any other place if we are under the influence of any mind altering substances and something bad happens it's immediately our own fault. When a hospital does it it's an outrage and the hospital should be sued. Am I getting that right?
 
2014-02-21 07:32:47 PM
At least it was painless.
 
2014-02-21 07:38:24 PM
it makes my skin itch and gives me bad dreams

also, constipation
 
2014-02-21 07:52:57 PM
3 years ago i had a gut twisting pain, went to the hospital,got a tube full of morphine...
it did not help the pain. they never found the cause, was sent home. i could have driven.
a beer would have gotten me higher...maybe
 
2014-02-21 07:53:27 PM
He could have been a multiple personality and offered to drive himself home.

/just saying.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-02-21 08:02:40 PM
Mattyb710

In the USA voluntary intoxication is not a defense to criminal charges but involuntary intoxication is. (With lots of exceptions and caveats and whereases and therefores. Go to law school and intern with a prosecutor and defense attorney before drinking or driving.)

If you drink and drive, that's your fault. If somebody spikes your drink and you drive, you can argue you didn't know you were drunk.

In the case of medication voluntarily consumed, the warnings on the bottle are relevant. So is advice from your physician. When you consumed the medication, should you have known it would mess you up?

I don't know how this case would work out in America. I will point out that an Ambien-influenced "sleep driver" was acquitted by a judge in a motor vehicle homicide case.
 
2014-02-21 08:04:53 PM
Am I the only one that caught where it said in the article the guy fell, hit his head, lost consciousness, and then decided it was a good idea to drive himself to the hospital?
 
2014-02-21 08:11:05 PM
If it goes to court the defense will argue that it was the concussion from his previous accident that caused him to pass out, thus rendering the hospital unresponsible. Doubt it goes to court tho. Some ambulance chaser will settle
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-02-21 08:21:19 PM
Jatybe

NZ has reduced ambulance chasing with a compulsory no fault insurance system.
 
2014-02-21 08:24:11 PM
2.bp.blogspot.com

I pump them quite often when I'm driving. I have yet to crash
 
2014-02-21 08:36:12 PM
I had my appendix removed a few years ago and this almost happened to me. A few hours after they cut it out a doctor gave me a shot of morphine and a hand full of pills and told me to go home. It took me about half an hour to find my way out of the hospital and locate the parking garage. When I got to my truck I had so much trouble unlocking the door that I decided to just open the tailgate and sleep in the bed. I slept is off and went home later that night.

/it was a Navy doctor
//Motrin
 
2014-02-21 08:54:41 PM

katerbug72: They asked him if he wanted to stay and he chose to leave and go home. They have no authority to keep him there. The only fault of the hospital I gather from that is telling him he should be able to drive one-handed. The man should have known better than to drug and drive.


But he was on morphine at the time.

Besides, this wasn't a made-an-error type situation, it was a passed-out-at-the-wheel situation.

Mattyb710: In any other place if we are under the influence of any mind altering substances and something bad happens it's immediately our own fault. When a hospital does it it's an outrage and the hospital should be sued. Am I getting that right?


They certainly should be sued for telling him it was ok to drive!

ZAZ: In the case of medication voluntarily consumed, the warnings on the bottle are relevant. So is advice from your physician. When you consumed the medication, should you have known it would mess you up?


And this was a hospital setting--you don't see the bottle, he wouldn't have seen the warnings.  All he had was what the doc said--and the doc said it was ok.
 
2014-02-21 09:11:33 PM

TEA-PARTY-PATRIOT: In my early twenties I had a roommate and friend who was somewhat on the prep side of things. He knew me and mine liked to smoke and we all sure as hell tied one on together but one day he comes over to the neighbors place as we are taking knife hits and decides to do what. Within 30 mins he drove himself to the hospital for an 'anxiety attack' and sure as shiat they just pumped him full of morphine for a few hours. I don't really understand the logic of pumping morphine into a kid that simply took too big a bong hit but I was jealous he had such a better night than me!



WTF language is this?
 
2014-02-21 10:14:23 PM

Mattyb710: Hospital pumps patient full of morphine, then lets him drive home. What could possibly go wrong?

He realizes he shouldn't be driving and calls for a ride?

shiat. He drove and crashed?

Well then does he take some responsibility for his actions and realize he shouldn't have driven the car while he was high as a farking kite?

No? Blame the hospital?

Yeah sounds about right. Just like the idiots that sue the bar/bartender when they get drunk and hop behind the wheel.


Let's try this again...

Guy shows up at the hospital with a broken arm and is given pain killers (morphine).  Decides not to stay for the night (night staff probably didn't even notice him slipping out the back to retrieve his car) and doesn't make it ten minutes without passing out behind the wheel and crashing.  Finds himself with medical bills he can not afford.

Lawsuit time.

Now, in slow motion.

He shows up in his car with a broken arm, where the hospital gives him painkillers to relieve the pain while they set his arm.  Evening rolls around, he's high on pain killers and has not yet been retrieved by family members- who, oddly enough had not  been notified by either the plaintiff nor the hospital-- and is probably recommended a stay for the night as he is both drugged up as well as restricted from driving due to his arm being set in a cast.  By 11pm, after either arguing with the staff about not wanting to stay, or boredom, he remembers his car is parked outside so he slips out the first opportunity he gets.  The rest, as they say, is history.

This happens more often than you think.  Patients drive themselves in for surgery, lie about having a ride home (they sign a voucher stating that a ride will be provided) because they either had no one to drive them or just did not want to inconvenience others.  Once they are declared stable enough to leave, they will wonder off "waiting on their ride" and sneak out to their cars and drive themselves home.

While the voucher relieves the hospital of responsibility should the patient get in trouble on the way home after claiming to have a driver, the staff make extraordinary efforts to ensure a driver is waiting for them.  Patients still occasionally pull a fast one by engaging in conversation with strangers on the way out, giving the appearance that their ride was there to pick them up.  As far as I know, we would not knowingly allow a patient to leave if they were still that much under (to the point of passing out), even with a driver as that level of grogginess would be considered abnormal and the patient be kept for further observation.  Handicapped by drugs and a cast?  The driver would have to present an ID and sign for the patient.
 
2014-02-21 10:27:27 PM

TEA-PARTY-PATRIOT: In my early twenties I had roommate and friend who was somewhat on the prep side of things. He knew me and mine liked to smoke and we all sure as hell tied one on together but one day he comes over the neighbors place as we are taking knife hits and decides to do what. Within 30 mins he drove himself to the hospital for an 'anxiety attack' and sure as shiat they just pumped him full of morphine for a few hours. I don't really understand the logic of pumping morphine into a kid that simply took too big a bong hit but I was jealous he had such a better night than me!


Morphine was used to counter the anxiety and shortness of breath.  Kid probably worked himself into a panic after getting high for the first time.
 
2014-02-21 11:33:28 PM

Jatybe: If it goes to court the defense will argue that it was the concussion from his previous accident that caused him to pass out, thus rendering the hospital unresponsible. Doubt it goes to court tho. Some ambulance chaser will settle


That wouldn't relieve the hospital of responsibility as they told him he was ok to drive.
 
2014-02-21 11:48:14 PM
I've got to go to this hospital.
 
2014-02-22 01:43:21 AM
I've had 3-dozen-plus kidney stone attacks, and would often drive myself to the ER.  I typically got IV morphine, and after an hour or so, I was sent on my way.  Never a word about having someone pick me up or require me to take a taxi.  Go figure.

If you're having a kidney stone attack, ask for Toradol, a really powerful NSAID.  It often eliminates the need for morphine (but who would pass up the chance for that?).

My largest stone measured 3mm diameter and 5mm long.  Took 3 different attacks and 3 ER visits (each about 2 weeks apart) before I finally passed that bastard.  Made a nice "clink" when it hit the bottom of the toilet bowl.
 
2014-02-22 01:49:35 AM

Ryker's Peninsula: They met every Thursday, Thursday, Thursday in the afternoon for a couple of beers and a game of pool?


Well-played, sir.  +1
 
2014-02-22 01:55:34 AM
The bartender gave me a double of tequila then let me drive home. Wasn't my fault.
 
2014-02-22 04:00:27 AM

bratface: TEA-PARTY-PATRIOT: ...taking knife hits and decides to do what.

WTF language is this?


Knife hits.

i.imgur.com

Guessing the other bit is just a typo of "one".
 
2014-02-22 08:39:39 AM

Loren: But he was on morphine at the time.


I don't know, when I was on morphine, I sure could tell that I was in no condition to drive.
 
2014-02-22 11:38:56 AM

indy_kid: I've had 3-dozen-plus kidney stone attacks, and would often drive myself to the ER.  I typically got IV morphine, and after an hour or so, I was sent on my way.  Never a word about having someone pick me up or require me to take a taxi.  Go figure.

If you're having a kidney stone attack, ask for Toradol, a really powerful NSAID.  It often eliminates the need for morphine (but who would pass up the chance for that?).

My largest stone measured 3mm diameter and 5mm long.  Took 3 different attacks and 3 ER visits (each about 2 weeks apart) before I finally passed that bastard.  Made a nice "clink" when it hit the bottom of the toilet bowl.



I've had four very painful kidney stone attacks spaced out over 10 years. First time they tried morphine (almost no pain relief), then dialudid (minor pain relief), and finally I got an old school doc that gave me demoral and that did the trick. I have had trouble finding it ever since. Don't know why hospitals don't want to stock or use it.
 
2014-02-22 01:25:29 PM

Radak: bratface: TEA-PARTY-PATRIOT: ...taking knife hits and decides to do what.

WTF language is this?

Knife hits.

[i.imgur.com image 244x162]

Guessing the other bit is just a typo of "one".



Thanks Radak. I guess we really do learn something new everyday.
 
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