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(Popular Science)   Scientists still trying to determine if cat bites lead to human depression or if cats just prefer biting depressed people   (popsci.com) divider line 38
    More: Interesting, cat bites, cats, depressions, suicide rates, mental stress, health records  
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2578 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Feb 2014 at 8:46 AM (26 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-02-20 07:47:37 AM
 
2014-02-20 08:44:59 AM

www.popsci.com


"You're worthless and weak.  And the toys you buy me suck."

 
2014-02-20 08:51:50 AM
not sure why but that headline made me laugh a little
 
2014-02-20 08:52:12 AM
Do not try to understand the ways of your feline masters, you're liable to get bitten for your trouble.
 
2014-02-20 08:53:46 AM
Well it makes sense. People with cats are typically the forver alone types.
 
2014-02-20 08:56:00 AM
Mynd you, Cät bites Kan be pretty nasti...
 
2014-02-20 08:57:39 AM
Stupid sorry assed people letting their cat bite them. What's wrong with you! You're the human being! It's a critter!
If it bites you, give it a good whack or a free flying lesson. I guarantee you that mess will stop.
 
2014-02-20 09:05:31 AM

varmitydog: Stupid sorry assed people letting their cat bite them. What's wrong with you! You're the human being! It's a critter!
If it bites you, give it a good whack or a free flying lesson. I guarantee you that mess will stop.


Yes, beat the sh*t out of them. That works for kids, too.
 
2014-02-20 09:16:45 AM
Scientists still trying to determine if cat bites lead to human depression or if cats just prefer biting depressed people

It's more the latter.  Cats don't like the way depressed people pet them.  In fact, it pisses them off.  So they bite to make them stop.
 
2014-02-20 09:17:02 AM

markfara: varmitydog: Stupid sorry assed people letting their cat bite them. What's wrong with you! You're the human being! It's a critter!
If it bites you, give it a good whack or a free flying lesson. I guarantee you that mess will stop.

Yes, beat the sh*t out of them. That works for kids, too.


Thanks for the advice!

/off to the woodshed
 
2014-02-20 09:33:26 AM
so what does it say about those of us who intentionally rile up the cat until he bites us?

\ya know, for fun!
 
2014-02-20 09:48:30 AM
As shown very well in David Foster Wallace's piece "The Depressed Person" depressed people are self-absorbed. (We are, see?) Self-absorbed people are not giving the cat the adoration s/he obviously deserves. This calls for punishment.
 
2014-02-20 09:56:52 AM
Depressed people are also more likely to rub a cat's belly more than three times.
 
2014-02-20 09:59:55 AM
It makes sense to me.  If I had a cat, I'd be depressed.
 
2014-02-20 10:02:04 AM
My cats won't bite me as long as I keep working and give them whatever they want.
 
2014-02-20 10:08:58 AM
My cats have never bitten me.  They are lovable moggies.  What they lack in tooth application they more than make up for by being sound powered perpetual motion machines.
 
2014-02-20 10:10:52 AM
Humans have spent centuries, nay, millennia, domesticating cats and dogs.
When I was a kid, dog bites and cat bites were very rare and the offending animal was put down immediately, thus removing the trait from the population, as god intended.

In just 50 years of Jackwagons unwilling to do the heavy lifting of controlling their "pets" and it is now commonplace for the animals to bite and even attack.

Maybe there is a lesson there.
 
2014-02-20 10:14:37 AM

markfara: varmitydog: Stupid sorry assed people letting their cat bite them. What's wrong with you! You're the human being! It's a critter!
If it bites you, give it a good whack or a free flying lesson. I guarantee you that mess will stop.

Yes, beat the sh*t out of them. That works for kids, too.


A quick smack on the head immediately after bad behaviour is not the same as a prolonged, anger-fuelled aggressive violent episode, aka "beating the shiat out of them".

Hilariously, most parents think the two are the same, and produce the same effects, and will instead opt for a prolonged, anger-fuelled, aggressive scream fest, which has just as much psychological damage to children, but without the nasty stigma of having your hand come in contact with your child.
 
2014-02-20 10:15:02 AM

snocone: Humans have spent centuries, nay, millennia, domesticating cats and dogs.
When I was a kid, dog bites and cat bites were very rare and the offending animal was put down immediately, thus removing the trait from the population, as god intended.

In just 50 years of Jackwagons unwilling to do the heavy lifting of controlling their "pets" and it is now commonplace for the animals to bite and even attack.

Maybe there is a lesson there.


Yeah, the lesson is that increased reporting and news hype makes it seem like a problem has increased when it actually hasn't.
 
2014-02-20 10:21:21 AM

ckccfa: snocone: Humans have spent centuries, nay, millennia, domesticating cats and dogs.
When I was a kid, dog bites and cat bites were very rare and the offending animal was put down immediately, thus removing the trait from the population, as god intended.

In just 50 years of Jackwagons unwilling to do the heavy lifting of controlling their "pets" and it is now commonplace for the animals to bite and even attack.

Maybe there is a lesson there.

Yeah, the lesson is that increased reporting and news hype makes it seem like a problem has increased when it actually hasn't.


Point proven.
TY
 
2014-02-20 10:21:33 AM

ckccfa: snocone: Humans have spent centuries, nay, millennia, domesticating cats and dogs.
When I was a kid, dog bites and cat bites were very rare and the offending animal was put down immediately, thus removing the trait from the population, as god intended.

In just 50 years of Jackwagons unwilling to do the heavy lifting of controlling their "pets" and it is now commonplace for the animals to bite and even attack.

Maybe there is a lesson there.

Yeah, the lesson is that increased reporting and news hype makes it seem like a problem has increased when it actually hasn't.


Well maybe we could put down journalists immediately, thus removing the trait from the population, as god intended.
 
2014-02-20 10:49:57 AM

moeburn: markfara: varmitydog: Stupid sorry assed people letting their cat bite them. What's wrong with you! You're the human being! It's a critter!
If it bites you, give it a good whack or a free flying lesson. I guarantee you that mess will stop.

Yes, beat the sh*t out of them. That works for kids, too.

A quick smack on the head immediately after bad behaviour is not the same as a prolonged, anger-fuelled aggressive violent episode, aka "beating the shiat out of them".

Hilariously, most parents think the two are the same, and produce the same effects, and will instead opt for a prolonged, anger-fuelled, aggressive scream fest, which has just as much psychological damage to children, but without the nasty stigma of having your hand come in contact with your child.


You've got a point. I was taking umbrage at the notion of throwing my cat across the room.

Personally, the only time I smack my cat is a gentle pop on the butt when I'm playing with her. This gets her riled up, and eventually she will indeed bite me. I never hit her as a punishment which, come to think of it, is mostly likely why she's a spoiled little b*tch who thinks it's ok to bite me.

Oh, well. Could be worse. . . .
 
2014-02-20 11:05:07 AM
Eli the Bitey available on Caturday
 
2014-02-20 11:07:48 AM

Shakes: Depressed people are also more likely to rub a cat's belly more than three times.


Cats aren't assholes, they're just rigidly bound by protocol and have to bite the shiat out of someone.
 
2014-02-20 11:12:50 AM

blacknite: so what does it say about those of us who intentionally rile up the cat until he bites us?

\ya know, for fun!


Yes!  My cats and I have a mutually trolling relationship.  I fark with them all the time and play rough with them, and they love it and come back for more.  One of them will mess with the back of my desk chair until I drum/beat on his back and grab his legs, he then latches on to me and tries to disembowel my forearm.  There's a lot of play biting, but this is also something they only feel comfortable doing with me.  But if I ever really get bitten while farking with them, it's because I'm being slow or stupid.  If I need to do something to my cats that they don't like/want (trimming their nails, giving them pills, other medical stuff) it is totally possible for me to do it with without getting bitten/scratched--because I'm a human, and I have things like thumbs and towels and a plan.
Part of why I'm able to fark with my cats and handle them with minimal injury is that both my parents raised me to respect an animal's boundaries--if I came to them, crying about how the cat had scratched me, they would ask me what I had done to the cat to make him hurt me.  It seemed harsh at the time, but it taught me valuable lessons about boundaries, communication, and to recognize the warning signs in an animal's body language (like "don't corner the cat" and "stop doing what you're doing when his ears go flat").  So now I can roughhouse with my cats in the way they like, and stop when they don't like it (likewise, if one of the cats gets too hyped up or rough, I disengage).

Animals have limited ways to communicate with us--biting and scratching are often ways of saying "stop doing that, I don't like it."  So I want to know what the hell someone was doing to a cat to get bitten so badly that they need to go to the hospital.  Maybe depressed people are more likely to hold or touch their animals in a way that the animal doesn't like, or to ignore the animal's warning signs.
 
2014-02-20 11:15:18 AM

moeburn: markfara: varmitydog: Stupid sorry assed people letting their cat bite them. What's wrong with you! You're the human being! It's a critter!
If it bites you, give it a good whack or a free flying lesson. I guarantee you that mess will stop.

Yes, beat the sh*t out of them. That works for kids, too.

A quick smack on the head immediately after bad behaviour is not the same as a prolonged, anger-fuelled aggressive violent episode, aka "beating the shiat out of them".

Hilariously, most parents think the two are the same, and produce the same effects, and will instead opt for a prolonged, anger-fuelled, aggressive scream fest, which has just as much psychological damage to children, but without the nasty stigma of having your hand come in contact with your child.


A slap on the head doesn't communicate well. Bite them. I'm not kidding. They're pre-programmed to know that means you're pissed about their behavior.

/the cat
//maybe it works on kids too, try it
 
2014-02-20 11:29:00 AM
markfara: I was taking umbrage at the notion of throwing my cat across the room.

I imagine that going to grab up a cat and throw it would get you bit worse. "A flying lesson" for a critter means a good swift kick that propels them airborne.

I suppose I look at cats differently than yourself; I live out in the country, my cats don't have names, never come in the house and live under the shed. They are forever leaving dead mice or snakes around the doorways. I think I have eight cats right right now; they come and go. A few of them never come close to me, others follow me around the yard and come up to be petted every time I sit down. If they bite me, they get a hit or a kick. Mostly I miss, but they get the point right quick.

Still, I can't imagine anyone letting their cat bite them. To me that's the person's fault for being an idiot.
 
2014-02-20 11:46:06 AM

snocone: Humans have spent centuries, nay, millennia, domesticating cats and dogs.
When I was a kid, dog bites and cat bites were very rare and the offending animal was put down immediately, thus removing the trait from the population, as god intended.

In just 50 years of Jackwagons unwilling to do the heavy lifting of controlling their "pets" and it is now commonplace for the animals to bite and even attack.

Maybe there is a lesson there.


Humans may have domesticated dogs, but with cats it's the other way around.  Now excuse me, my masters are demanding breakfast.
 
2014-02-20 12:06:40 PM
i.imgur.com
 
2014-02-20 12:15:14 PM

markfara: varmitydog: Stupid sorry assed people letting their cat bite them. What's wrong with you! You're the human being! It's a critter!
If it bites you, give it a good whack or a free flying lesson. I guarantee you that mess will stop.

Yes, beat the sh*t out of them. That works for kids, too.


oh heavens no, just give your cat a time out, i'm sure he'll quit biting after that

don't hurt their feelings
 
2014-02-20 03:14:56 PM
www.lesliehouk.com
 
2014-02-20 05:03:27 PM
I was under the impression that the "Cat Owner/Depressed person" Venn Diagram is almost entirely overlapping.
 
2014-02-20 05:51:07 PM
Link wouldn't work - got page not found.

Anyway...

I'm a depressed person and I don't own, and haven't been bitten by, a cat. How do the scientists explain that then?
 
2014-02-20 06:11:46 PM

varmitydog: Still, I can't imagine anyone letting their cat bite them. To me that's the person's fault for being an idiot.


I totally agree with you. I never understand why any pet that bites doesn't receive and automatic smack to the head for having done so. (Anyone who cannot see the difference between one smack and beating the sh*t out of something has some issues of their own.)

By not providing a negative response to the cat, all you've done is reinforced the biting behaviour. You've stopped doing whatever you were doing when the cat bit you, which was what it wanted. From the cat's perspective it got a positive response. It got rewarded. So  really, you've just encouraged it to bite. Now it knows when you do what it doesn't want, it only needs to bite you to get its way.

If instead it found out that a bite gets it a smack, then biting is no longer likely to be the first option when you do something it doesn't like, and it may choose to move away instead. You need to give a negative response to the behaviour you don't want to see repeated, instead of a positive one. Same as if you stick you hand in a fire and it gets burnt, you learn to not stick your hand in a fire.

Obvious I'd have thought, but not to cat owners, apparently.
 
2014-02-20 06:29:18 PM

markfara: Yes, beat the sh*t out of them. That works for kids, too.


*facepalm*  Animals are not humans.  Animal experts agree that treating them like "kids" probably causes more behavioral problems than anything else.
 
2014-02-20 07:26:06 PM

ThrobblefootSpectre: markfara: Yes, beat the sh*t out of them. That works for kids, too.

*facepalm*  Animals are not humans.  Animal experts agree that treating them like "kids" probably causes more behavioral problems than anything else.


So beat the sh*t out of your kids, but not your pets? Makes sense to me.
 
2014-02-21 12:39:44 AM

CaliNJGuy: not sure why but that headline made me laugh a little


here three. I laughed.
 
jdm
2014-02-21 04:58:33 AM
"I swear I'm gonna bite you hard, and taste your tinny blood, if you don't stop the self defeating lies you've been repeating since the day you brought me home... I know you're strong"

/obscure?
 
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