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(NYPost)   Lo did the sky become as blood, and verily did serpents most vile pour forth from the earth's fundament, and the Angel of Fark appeared clad in silver raiment crying out "The New York Post has said something nice about DeBlasio"   (nypost.com) divider line 16
    More: Unlikely, DeBlasio, New York Post, Fark, Blasio  
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417 clicks; posted to Politics » on 19 Feb 2014 at 10:09 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



16 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-02-19 10:09:47 AM  
Now if he drops the dipshiat soda ban and leaves the carriage horses alone there'll be hope for him yet.
 
2014-02-19 10:12:56 AM  
Is this greenlight everything day?
 
2014-02-19 10:17:03 AM  
Wait until Rupert hears about this.
 
2014-02-19 10:28:56 AM  

Gulper Eel: Now if he drops the dipshiat soda ban and leaves the carriage horses alone there'll be hope for him yet.


The soda ban was blocked by the courts, although it appears to be still under appeal.
 
2014-02-19 10:29:45 AM  
Just noticed -- the writer's from the Manhattan Institute, no less.
 
2014-02-19 10:35:20 AM  

Gulper Eel: Now if he drops the dipshiat soda ban and leaves the carriage horses alone there'll be hope for him yet.


Leaving the soda aside, what, exactly, is the outrage about the carriage horses? Why do people suddenly care so much about them?
 
2014-02-19 10:41:22 AM  

grumpfuff: Leaving the soda aside, what, exactly, is the outrage about the carriage horses? Why do people suddenly care so much about them?


They're "iconic". It's really that stupid.
 
2014-02-19 10:42:20 AM  

grumpfuff: Leaving the soda aside, what, exactly, is the outrage about the carriage horses? Why do people suddenly care so much about them?


It's an obvious giveaway to developers, figleafing as an animal-rights measure.

The stables for the carriage horses are on some mighty valuable property.
 
2014-02-19 10:46:12 AM  

Gulper Eel: grumpfuff: Leaving the soda aside, what, exactly, is the outrage about the carriage horses? Why do people suddenly care so much about them?

It's an obvious giveaway to developers, figleafing as an animal-rights measure.

The stables for the carriage horses are on some mighty valuable property.


Okay, so why not bulldoze them and replace them with something useful?
 
2014-02-19 10:53:13 AM  

lilplatinum: Okay, so why not bulldoze them and replace them with something useful?


Because there aren't enough luxury high-rises going up, so fark those prole carriage-horse drivers and stable cleaners, amirite?
 
2014-02-19 10:54:26 AM  

Gulper Eel: grumpfuff: Leaving the soda aside, what, exactly, is the outrage about the carriage horses? Why do people suddenly care so much about them?

It's an obvious giveaway to developers, figleafing as an animal-rights measure.

The stables for the carriage horses are on some mighty valuable property.


Alright, so I ask again. Why should I care?

Also, claiming the stables are on "mighty valuable property" is laughable. The two I know of are not on anything of the sort. One of them is(or at least was) in Central Park. Are you suggesting the mayor will sell off parts of Central Park?
 
2014-02-19 11:10:59 AM  

Gulper Eel: lilplatinum: Okay, so why not bulldoze them and replace them with something useful?

Because there aren't enough luxury high-rises going up, so fark those prole carriage-horse drivers and stable cleaners, amirite?


A quick google says there are 220 horses and 160 carrige drivers.    With the people to care for the horses, thats maybe 200 total jobs.

There would be more jobs created building, servicing, and staffing a few new high rises than facilitating some obnoxious tourist traps that hold up traffic and smell like shiat.
 
2014-02-19 11:14:34 AM  

lilplatinum: Gulper Eel: lilplatinum: Okay, so why not bulldoze them and replace them with something useful?

Because there aren't enough luxury high-rises going up, so fark those prole carriage-horse drivers and stable cleaners, amirite?

A quick google says there are 220 horses and 160 carrige drivers.    With the people to care for the horses, thats maybe 200 total jobs.

There would be more jobs created building, servicing, and staffing a few new high rises than facilitating some obnoxious tourist traps that hold up traffic and smell like shiat.


Not to mention that if you saw the rates they charged for a trip, calling them proles would be a bit of a stretch. Something like $175 for 45 minutes(I don't remember the exact specifics), and there is usually a tip.

The carriages aren't there for every-day people. They're there for wealthy tourists.

Anyone who complains about getting rid of them is only interested in opposing the idea because DeBlasio is for it.
 
2014-02-19 11:26:17 AM  

Gulper Eel: It's an obvious giveaway to developers


Translation: "this hasn't happened yet and I have no evidence it will happen, but I'll just throw it out there and call it obvious."
 
2014-02-19 01:07:28 PM  

Wooly Bully: Gulper Eel: It's an obvious giveaway to developers

Translation: "this hasn't happened yet and I have no evidence it will happen, but I'll just throw it out there and call it obvious."


It's become the talking point begun at the American Spectator and recycled among the usual suspects. De Blasio's association with Steve Nislick is the "proof" that De Blasio is going to sell this land (including part of Central Park?) to developers. That may very well be his plan, but it is all speculation.

The bad guy in this drama, according to the carriage drivers, is  Steve Nislick, chief executive officer [NOT ANYMORE] of a New Jersey-based real-estate development company, Edison Properties. The company "employs legions of lobbyists to influence city decisions on real estate and zoning in its favor," journalist Michael Gross reported in 2009, pointing out that two of Edison's businesses "have multiple locations in the same Far West Midtown neighborhood as the stables where the Central Park horses are housed." An anti-carriage pamphlet Nislick circulated in 2008 made this interesting observation: "Currently, the stables consist of 64,000 square feet of valuable real estate on lots that could accomodate up to 150,000 square feet of development. These lots could be sold for new development."

"What are the odds that good neighbor Nislick, the out-of-state real estate developer, simply covets those valuable, underdeveloped New York lots -- and has teamed up with ambitious pols to use the emotions of animal rights activists as fuel for their own agendas?" Nislick founded a 501(c)4 group called New Yorkers for Clean, Livable and Safe Streets (NYCLASS) that spent big money to elect de Blasio mayor.



Interestingly, Nislick is no longer CEO of Edison Properties and has positioned NYCLASS as an animal advocate on many issues beyond the Central Park horses.
 
2014-02-19 01:09:54 PM  
I didn't even vote for the guy, but the Post just can't help itself:

"Rough as his first few weeks have been"


"Rough" is now providing similar snow clearance to all of Manhattan and keeping the schools open based on a prediction that sanitation could clear the streets (a prediction which turned out to be correct).
 
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