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(London Evening Standard)   It's hung on longer than expected, but it's time to say goodbye to your office's landline   (standard.co.uk ) divider line
    More: Interesting, team learning, Russian roulette  
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1898 clicks; posted to Business » on 19 Feb 2014 at 11:34 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-02-19 09:39:02 AM  
Meanwhile, in reality......
 
2014-02-19 09:46:06 AM  
Hmmm. Wonder what they will hook the alarm system to then. Maybe we can hire someone to stay there with a cell phone.
 
2014-02-19 09:49:51 AM  
I don't think that would work too well at a call center with old-school equipment.
 
2014-02-19 10:02:13 AM  
So how exactly do I keep a cell phone working for 12 to 14 hours a day?  That would be a pretty neat trick.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-02-19 10:03:11 AM  
At least half my jobs since 2000 have had IP phones, not real landlines.
 
2014-02-19 10:06:13 AM  
hah, I do exactly that.  If someone REALLY needs to talk to me, they can (a) leave a message or (b) contact me via email.  I get waaaaay too many calls from salespeople.
 
2014-02-19 10:23:02 AM  
The problem with cell phones as office phones is conference calls, I don't know how many times I've been on a call with someone who has to keep rejoining because they are in a bad service area.  Also the call waiting on cell phones often beeps loud enough for everyone to hear.  Don't get me started on text and e-mail notifications.   Get a grownup Voip line for your business calls people.
 
2014-02-19 10:44:25 AM  
VoIP and associated communications-over-IP are coming fast. From office to carrier to government, every level.
 
2014-02-19 10:58:40 AM  

KarmicDisaster: Hmmm. Wonder what they will hook the alarm system to then. Maybe we can hire someone to stay there with a cell phone.


My alarm system has a sim card in it and is hooked up via the cell network. No landline required.
 
2014-02-19 10:59:23 AM  

Tr0mBoNe: Meanwhile, in reality......


This.  We still have fax machines too.  They are used many times a day.  Not everyone works in bleeding edge high tech industries.
 
2014-02-19 11:16:17 AM  
Good idea, let's conduct business via smoke signals
 
2014-02-19 11:19:29 AM  

KarmicDisaster: Hmmm. Wonder what they will hook the alarm system to then. Maybe we can hire someone to stay there with a cell phone.


Lots of alarm systems can now accept a SIM and use the cell network, which is actually a better solution because somebody breaking in can't just clip the phone line before entering.
 
2014-02-19 11:34:58 AM  
We moved to soft phones a few years ago. Everyone over 50 uses them daily. Everyone else promptly forwarded them to their work cells, then forgot the number.

I don't even bother listing mine in my email signature, and I couldn't tell you where the headset is if my life depended on it.

I haven't seen an actual desktop phone in some years.
 
2014-02-19 11:37:20 AM  
We're a small data cabling company. We don't have a landline, we don't have indoor plumbing. But our wifi and cell signals will damn near pop corn.
 
2014-02-19 11:38:55 AM  

ZAZ: At least half my jobs since 2000 have had IP phones, not real landlines.


that is what I use all day.
I do tech support, too.
Once in a while some dumb suit farks up the bandwidth and we lose calls.
But they won't let us apply a technical solution to that.
(which is kicking said suit in the nuts)
 
2014-02-19 11:43:06 AM  

KarmicDisaster: Hmmm. Wonder what they will hook the alarm system to then. Maybe we can hire someone to stay there with a cell phone.


VOIP. It's been around a while...
 
2014-02-19 11:47:58 AM  
That is great, but you have to convince your company to provide something else, anything else, because I don't give my personal cell phone out to corporations. Never ever. You want to get a hold of me 24/7 then provide me with a cell phone, oh and a 60% raise. I don't understand why people allow their employers 24 hour access with out getting properly compensated.
 
2014-02-19 11:52:25 AM  
At my job we use land lines for fire alarms and for the SRST direct lines.  This way if the network connection drops between the site and CUCM at the main site they can still call 911.  Plus 911 gets routed out the local SRST FXO port at all times so that the PSAP gets the correct address.
 
2014-02-19 11:55:00 AM  
Sure subby. Because I want people from 4 different time zones calling my cell phone.
 
2014-02-19 11:58:21 AM  
(also posted in the article comments)

And who is paying for all this hip and chic technology for the workers? If I'm working for a company there is no way that I am going to provide my own mobile device, or pay for my own mobile device's subscription fees, to do work on it for my employer.

The point of a desk phone is that it is a utility like lights that cost the employee nothing to use, and over the course of years costs the employer very little to own and operate. Desk phones just work, for years to decades, and there are no subscription fees for providing mailbox storage within the company. There are no limited-life batteries that eventually fail and need the whole phone to be replaced.

If your social image is that important to you, then fine, get rid of the desk phone, but as an employee I'm not buying or paying maintenance on the mobile replacement for the company
 
2014-02-19 11:58:26 AM  

Slaves2Darkness: That is great, but you have to convince your company to provide something else, anything else, because I don't give my personal cell phone out to corporations. Never ever. You want to get a hold of me 24/7 then provide me with a cell phone, oh and a 60% raise. I don't understand why people allow their employers 24 hour access with out getting properly compensated.


Pretty much same with me. I got pissed off when my boss gave my personal phone out to clients, I just didnt answer it when I wasnt on the clock. Plus I am so far down the chain by the time they upgrade me to the latest high tech phone gadget everyone else will be 2 generations ahead of me.
 
2014-02-19 12:00:55 PM  

ZAZ: At least half my jobs since 2000 have had IP phones, not real landlines.


All of our desk phones are IP phones, but we still keep a few POTS lines around -- for security systems, fax machines, emergency calls when the power's out, etc. Except for maybe the fax machine, I don't see any of those going away anytime soon.
 
2014-02-19 12:21:54 PM  
Land-line, desktops, fax. They'll be around for a while.

Last call from work: We NEED you here!
Me: I'm on Nantucket and I'm drinking. Do you need me now?
Last call.
 
2014-02-19 12:24:53 PM  

flaminio: ZAZ: At least half my jobs since 2000 have had IP phones, not real landlines.

All of our desk phones are IP phones, but we still keep a few POTS lines around -- for security systems, fax machines, emergency calls when the power's out, etc. Except for maybe the fax machine, I don't see any of those going away anytime soon.


Technically you can run fax lines through an IP PBX now.  We use CUCM and provide fax lines using a VG204/224 or ATA device.  We are converting all fax lines to VoIP eventually.
 
2014-02-19 12:55:12 PM  
We have the VoIP phones at work.
They suck at call quality. Hissing popping, dropped calls.
/state govt
//low bids
 
2014-02-19 01:20:27 PM  

ZAZ: At least half my jobs since 2000 have had IP phones, not real landlines.


For you to use, yes.
I guarantee Security has at least one hard wire connection.
Depending on where you work, there are likely others scattered around as Emergency Phones.

Cell is neat, but easily blocked, dropped, and overwhelmed.
 
2014-02-19 01:23:49 PM  
Pretty much VoIP.

State office.  The 'internal billing' option through the state's PBX charges $19 a month a line to start.  $40 any time someone touches it (install, move, etc). Hundreds if they have to move any copper.  And, if the line is even allowed to make long distance calls, someone has to track down what calls were attached to which billing code at the end of the month.

Or, we use a third-party VOIP provider for around $10 a month a line.  Including long distance. Moving offices around takes seconds. Creating ringovers or whatever is done almost instantly.

The group providing the 'official' PBX service is not thrilled by this.
 
2014-02-19 01:33:01 PM  

wildlifer: We have the VoIP phones at work.
They suck at call quality. Hissing popping, dropped calls.
/state govt
//low bids


Yeah, sounds like shiatty equipment. I run some Cisco SPA (Sipura) stuff on Voip.MS at home, and here at the office we have Mitel. I actually prefer the Cisco phones. Setup some QOS on the router and the higher VOIP.ms call routing setting, and it's way better than a cell phone.

As I'm a bit weird, I actually was also able to hook up my condo's POTS intercom line to the VOIP system. Not really that difficult, but almost unprecedented (in a residential setting).
 
2014-02-19 01:51:42 PM  

Tr0mBoNe: Meanwhile, in reality......


Exactly at worst new offices have a VoIP solution that is still a landline in the modern world.
 
2014-02-19 02:14:24 PM  

nekom: Tr0mBoNe: Meanwhile, in reality......

This.  We still have fax machines too.  They are used many times a day.  Not everyone works in bleeding edge high tech industries.


Christ, I hate fax machines with a passion due to how they are used...looking at you real estate.

Almost lost a chance to buy my house due to them.  Apparently the idea that people buy houses over long distances BEFORE they move to the area is unheard of.

Seller: "We faxed you some documents to sign.  sign them and fax them back."

(receives fax, signs and faxes it back)

Seller: "There was an error on our part, we need to fax you the correction so you can sign it and fax it back"

(receives fax, signs it and faxes it back)

Seller: "The faxed copy we received is hard to read on some parts and we need to re-do it all over again"

(*Headdesk*, since each time I need to fax it requires another trip to my office...on a Saturday)

Apparently, faxing the same document four times makes it harder to read...gee I never would have guessed that after seeing how crappy something looks the first time you fax it.  But to scan it using nice 1200DPI settings is just not allowed for probably some stupid "Security" reason where you may photoshop some part of it (even though you could photoshop, print and then fax that)
 
2014-02-19 02:19:49 PM  

Betep: Land-line, desktops, fax. They'll be around for a while.

Last call from work: We NEED you here!
Me: I'm on Nantucket and I'm drinking. Do you need me now?
Last call.


Not to mention mid-level+ execs do not answer their own phone at large corporations.
 
2014-02-19 04:04:06 PM  
Today, the phone on most of our desks exists in a state of pathetic limbo, buzzing with calls from the people whose emails we have chosen to ignore. We don't want to play Russian roulette with our time and nerves by answering calls that could be from anyone: the new logic says that if it's important, they will know my mobile number and call me on that.

Yeah, I want my cell phone minutes to be used up by calls for work.

I suppose the PC is "dead", too, isn't it?

You know what the stupidest part of this article is? They keep claiming that only "salespeople" will use phones, yet keep insisting that anyone who really wants to get ahold of you will "call your mobile number". You realize that's a phone, too, right? Now, if you were doing this article abut companies switching to VOIP phones and softphones, you might have a point, but instead, you went the potato route, drifted somewhere in the middle, and didn't really get to any kind of point except to loudly(And prematurely) proclaim the death of the telephone in general.
 
2014-02-19 04:05:52 PM  

ZAZ: At least half my jobs since 2000 have had IP phones, not real landlines.


but this article is trying to claim that even THAT is outdated, and that not only are you going to use your cell phone for work, but your are going to expect any other calls to be nuisance calls...
 
2014-02-19 04:23:33 PM  

Lawnchair: Pretty much VoIP.

State office.  The 'internal billing' option through the state's PBX charges $19 a month a line to start.  $40 any time someone touches it (install, move, etc). Hundreds if they have to move any copper.  And, if the line is even allowed to make long distance calls, someone has to track down what calls were attached to which billing code at the end of the month.

Or, we use a third-party VOIP provider for around $10 a month a line.  Including long distance. Moving offices around takes seconds. Creating ringovers or whatever is done almost instantly.

The group providing the 'official' PBX service is not thrilled by this.


"The group" being telco union members, I'd bet.
 
2014-02-19 04:29:41 PM  

Hyjamon: Apparently, faxing the same document four times makes it harder to read...gee I never would have guessed that after seeing how crappy something looks the first time you fax it.  But to scan it using nice 1200DPI settings is just not allowed for probably some stupid "Security" reason where you may photoshop some part of it (even though you could photoshop, print and then fax that)


That's the dumbest thing. If you did 'shop it, you could tell by the pixels and from seeing quite a few 'shops. But once you've printed it and faxed any modification you've made would be obscured by the process -- even Senator Vreenak wouldn't be able to tell it's a fake.
 
2014-02-19 04:44:46 PM  
There are such things as "cell desk phones." Desk phone running through the cell network.

If you get one with a voice-only plan, it's only about $20/month for unlimited talk time.
 
2014-02-19 04:57:11 PM  

Betep: Land-line, desktops, fax. They'll be around for a while.

Last call from work: We NEED you here!
Me: I'm on Nantucket and I'm drinking. Do you need me now?
Last call.


When cell phones had been out for a few years, the following conversation took place between a higher up and myself:

"If your cell phone rings while you're on vacation then you answer it."

"Why?  I'm on vacation, which means I'm not working."

"Doesn't matter."

"Really?  Then what?"

"You answer your phone....Or else."

"How are you going to prove I'm able to get reception in the mountains of Arkansas?"

"Uh..........."

"Like I said, I don't answer my cell phone when I'm on vacation and I don't work while I'm on vacation.  Bye."
 
2014-02-19 05:05:46 PM  
Everything is VoIP. Get over it, move on, and replace all that copper with fiber to the comms cupboard.
 
2014-02-19 05:19:00 PM  

nekom: Tr0mBoNe: Meanwhile, in reality......

This.  We still have fax machines too.  They are used many times a day.  Not everyone works in bleeding edge high tech industries.


I've been rolling out a lot of VoIP systems for my clients.  With Vitelity, you can get a $100 box that'll hook up to up to 2 fax machines, providing fax 'lines' that then get uploaded to an efax service and sent out.  It can also receive from the efax service and send the results to the fax machines.  The only difference from an analog landline is the delay in when it is sent, and when it actually gets delivered.
 
2014-02-19 07:37:19 PM  
We have VOIP here, too. Apparently, I can also make and receive calls on my laptop. I can scan on the copier workstation and have a .pdf emailed to me so no need for fax machines. What a world!
 
2014-02-19 07:56:19 PM  
The problem with cell phones is the network gets quickly overwhelmed and unuseable during a major crisis like a tornado hitting a populated area.
 
2014-02-19 08:06:35 PM  
I have an oldskool Avaya desk phone plugged into a boring old PBX. Sort of. PBX routes calls within the company and to our teleconferencing system over the leased IP lines as VOIP, calls to outside the company over POTS.

Company saved SCADS of money over recabling all the buildings with bonus ethernet (we hardly have enough for our computer density) and replacing every phone with an IP phone. New construction gets the IP phone or softphone treatment as appropriate for the role (those of us who yak on the phone all day get hardware, people who are supposed to shut up and do real work have softphones). All the benefits of IP telephony are still there. The only downside is that we have 90's looking black phones on our desks, and nobody gives any shiats about that.
 
2014-02-19 08:24:53 PM  
Haven't worked in an office where most people had phones at the desks in ~6 years or so. It's all about Skype and Hangouts these days.
 
2014-02-19 09:40:37 PM  
Another bullshiat article proclaiming the death of {pick a technology}.
 
2014-02-19 10:47:57 PM  

Weng: I have an oldskool Avaya desk phone plugged into a boring old PBX. Sort of. PBX routes calls within the company and to our teleconferencing system over the leased IP lines as VOIP, calls to outside the company over POTS.

Company saved SCADS of money over recabling all the buildings with bonus ethernet (we hardly have enough for our computer density) and replacing every phone with an IP phone. New construction gets the IP phone or softphone treatment as appropriate for the role (those of us who yak on the phone all day get hardware, people who are supposed to shut up and do real work have softphones). All the benefits of IP telephony are still there. The only downside is that we have 90's looking black phones on our desks, and nobody gives any shiats about that.


Actually some ip phones like Cisco's models have a switch port built-in such that one wall jack can support two devices.  So your port density doesn't need to change just because you have ip phones.
 
2014-02-19 11:00:34 PM  
Easy scenario to see if your 'solution' is a good one:

Power has been out in the entire area for six hours. What are the odds of using your 'solution' and getting dial tone?

If you answered less than 90% then your solution sucks.
 
2014-02-19 11:47:17 PM  
We need a "Nonsense" tag for crap like this.
 
2014-02-20 12:45:58 AM  
It's fun and games till a massive emergency happen and you're without power for a few days, that includes home owners also. About a year ago At&t cell service went to shiat(1 bar or less on 2G) in this area and it took 12 hours to get back up
 
2014-02-20 02:06:29 AM  

cirby: There are such things as "cell desk phones." Desk phone running through the cell network.

If you get one with a voice-only plan, it's only about $20/month for unlimited talk time.


Where do we find a voice only plan for $20?
 
2014-02-20 03:38:04 AM  
Pretty VoIP phone with little cameras for teleconference here. It's nice to see the faces of the people I work with in other countries.
 
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