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(WBTV 3 Charlotte)   Southerners not used to dealing with snow apparently don't know where to dispose of it. "It's just insensitive. The handicapped have enough obstacles to deal with everyday so were we don't need to make their life harder and that's what's happening"   (wbtv.com) divider line 167
    More: Obvious, Queen City, botanical gardens, North Carolina State Highway Patrol, Wbtv, snow  
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9314 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Feb 2014 at 10:32 AM (43 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-02-17 12:30:34 PM  

DubtodaIll: While we in the South may have a difficult time dealing with things like snow, I do find it amusing how rabidly people who actually deal with snow regularly are dumping on the South about its issues.  But hey, anything to help ease that seasonal depression right guys? Glad we can help.  Now just let me look at my 5 day forecast. Ah yes, 65, 74, 74, 79, 78, 74.


Pfft, whatever.  It's 26 here.  Farking heat wave.

/plus 5-7 inches of snow
 
2014-02-17 12:32:16 PM  

d23: offmymeds: capt.hollister: Cotham believes the snow piles weren't purposefully pushed into handicapped spots, but she was still surprised that the incident wasn't isolated but instead widespread.

So, they just grew there ?

Ever hear of a Cleveland Steamer?

[images.somethingawful.com image 293x475]

It just didn't fall from the sky.

you asshole.. I am eating lunch!


www.all-about-laughter.com
 
2014-02-17 12:32:17 PM  

durbnpoisn: Handicapped spaces are among the few things I actually agree with in terms of parking lot design.  So much to a point that it really does make me nuts when I see some jerkoff park in one of those spaces, with nothing more than a tag hanging from their mirror, and they obviously have no physical impairment at all.  They likely borrowed the tag from a relative or something.

There is a reason those spots exists.  To make use of them when you don't need them is reprehensible.
To pile snow in them, and prevent people from using them is just as bad.


While I agree with you mostly (and this is why I don't have one yet: my condition is not yet bad enough that I think I should be taking up that parking) you should be careful about this. Not all disabilities are equally visible to a stranger. For example, I wear leg braces that can be totally concealed under my pants. Although for the most part I agree that there are a lot of people abusing these permits by using ones issued to someone else, etc, I would never go an confront someone in public over it unless I KNEW that's what they were doing. Because there are invisible disabilities.
 
2014-02-17 12:33:09 PM  

TheNewJesus: Southerners apparently need someone to take care of them, constantly.

Not impressed.


Some entire areas are 100% handicapped, as far as I can tell.
 
2014-02-17 12:37:44 PM  

d23: offmymeds: capt.hollister: Cotham believes the snow piles weren't purposefully pushed into handicapped spots, but she was still surprised that the incident wasn't isolated but instead widespread.

So, they just grew there ?

Ever hear of a Cleveland Steamer?

[images.somethingawful.com image 293x475]

It just didn't fall from the sky.

you asshole.. I am eating lunch!


Is it a "hot lunch"? :D
 
2014-02-17 12:43:38 PM  

Mnemia: durbnpoisn: Handicapped spaces are among the few things I actually agree with in terms of parking lot design.  So much to a point that it really does make me nuts when I see some jerkoff park in one of those spaces, with nothing more than a tag hanging from their mirror, and they obviously have no physical impairment at all.  They likely borrowed the tag from a relative or something.

There is a reason those spots exists.  To make use of them when you don't need them is reprehensible.
To pile snow in them, and prevent people from using them is just as bad.

While I agree with you mostly (and this is why I don't have one yet: my condition is not yet bad enough that I think I should be taking up that parking) you should be careful about this. Not all disabilities are equally visible to a stranger. For example, I wear leg braces that can be totally concealed under my pants. Although for the most part I agree that there are a lot of people abusing these permits by using ones issued to someone else, etc, I would never go an confront someone in public over it unless I KNEW that's what they were doing. Because there are invisible disabilities.


Yeah, I understand that.  And I have made the initial mistake of thinking someone was poaching a space at first, only to see them limping in an odd manner.  Or, to see someone park, who is just fine, but then help their 900 year old grandmother out of the back seat. In those cases, I take my bad feelings back.

But I've seen people who are perfectly healthy pull up, pull the tag out of the glove box just to hang it on the mirror, and almost jog into the store.  I so feel like giving those people a punch in the kidney.
 
2014-02-17 12:44:40 PM  

MaritimeGirl: I'm guessing that parking lots aren't typically designed to allow for snowbanks in North Carolina?


Well, no parking lots are. When it becomes a problem, it's just plowed in a pile somewhere. Usually they do this far away from the doors because, duh, having huge piles of snow where everyone is walking and parking is inconvenient. I'm guessing the plow folks are just lazy/incompetent.
 
2014-02-17 12:46:26 PM  

Mnemia: trappedspirit: "It's just insensitive," said Pat Cotham. "[The handicapped] have enough obstacles to deal with everyday so were we don't need to make their life harder and that's what's happening."

I don't know which is more retarded, dumping the snow in the handicap spaces, the language used here which seems to indicate that they actually believe the snow was dumped there to intentionally make it some kind of challenge getting into the spot, or this headline.  It's a downhill race in the back of a shopping cart.

Which language are you referring to? Insensitivity doesn't necessarily imply that it was done intentionally; that could just mean that it was done without a thought for how it would affect some people. And I'd say that that is an accurate statement if the article's account of what was happening is actually accurate (a big if, given that it's the news media).

I don't think this is a particularly big problem, and it's not going to matter in a few days anyway, but I don't think that the language used there is implying what you seem to think it is.


Well sure, you can be insensitive to something you are oblivious or ignorant of, but the captain obvious comment after that seemed to indicate that something other than simple recognition of where the snow was going was necessary for correction of this situation.
 
2014-02-17 12:47:33 PM  
How hard is it to bring someone out with a leaf blower and a McLeod? Seriously, break up the snowpile and employ the leaf blower. The blower's motor cycles air near the hotter parts of the machine, which heats the air to above ambient temperature. That combined with the steady airflow will melt the snow pretty quickly.

Seriously, you idiots don't know how to handle a snowstorm at all, do you...
 
2014-02-17 12:48:40 PM  
It is bad enough that I must drag race those little old ladies in their Cadillacs to get a handicapped spot at WalMart and now I must park on top of the snow?
 
2014-02-17 12:48:49 PM  

EyeballKid: ZAZ: You'd think they would have learned...

Based on what? When did this last happen?


Last week?
 
2014-02-17 12:50:44 PM  
Here in FL we call handicapped spaces "yankee lanes" because 90% of them are filled with cars with plates from Ohio, NY, and Pennsylvania.
 
2014-02-17 12:52:57 PM  

aseras: They just need an ADA troll to try and park and then nail them with half a dozen lawsuits for $1K statutory damages each. They'll stop doing it.


The OC Weekly did an exposé on one of those a while back. TLDR: he didn't sue his lawyer, whose office space had similar offenses.

/And I learned I could hate a handicapped person
 
2014-02-17 12:53:01 PM  

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Here in FL we call handicapped spaces "yankee lanes" because 90% of them are filled with cars with plates from Ohio, NY, and Pennsylvania.


I would think "snow bird perch" would be more appropriate.
 
2014-02-17 12:53:32 PM  

durbnpoisn: But I've seen people who are perfectly healthy pull up, pull the tag out of the glove box just to hang it on the mirror, and almost jog into the store. I so feel like giving those people a punch in the kidney.


Not disagreeing, but if yuu're using a temp tag (around here at least) you're supposed to put it up only after parking.  They take up a big chunk of your view when driving.

/Had a temp tag once for one of the "invisible" disabilities.
//Got better
///Getting worse again.
 
2014-02-17 12:53:37 PM  

bikerbob59: EyeballKid: ZAZ: You'd think they would have learned...

Based on what? When did this last happen?

Last week?


No, no, not snowing in the South...Southerners learning something!
 
2014-02-17 12:56:38 PM  

darkjezter: This isn't just limited to the south.  In Washington D.C. the whole city shuts down if a single snowflake hits the ground.

Meanwhile, here in the Rockies, they don't even close schools if two feet of snow falls.  From Kindergarten until my senior year of high school I never had a single day of school canceled because of snow.


Growing up in Montana we never had a "snow day" from school. Closest we came was when the temp dropped to -40 (C or F, your pick) and they announced that if the buses don't start, they'll call it off for the day. The buses started.
 
2014-02-17 12:57:07 PM  

trappedspirit: Well sure, you can be insensitive to something you are oblivious or ignorant of, but the captain obvious comment after that seemed to indicate that something other than simple recognition of where the snow was going was necessary for correction of this situation.


I still don't follow your reasoning here. The second part of the statement you quoted doesn't imply that it was necessarily intentional, either. You can make someone's life harder even without meaning to, if you are insensitive to the fact that you are doing so. People do that all the time, and this is just another instance of that. And I don't follow what you are saying when you claim that the statement "seemed to indicate that something other than simple recognition of where the snow was going was necessary for correction of this situation". Or are you referring to something different from what you quoted?
 
2014-02-17 01:01:28 PM  

durbnpoisn: Mnemia: durbnpoisn: Handicapped spaces are among the few things I actually agree with in terms of parking lot design.  So much to a point that it really does make me nuts when I see some jerkoff park in one of those spaces, with nothing more than a tag hanging from their mirror, and they obviously have no physical impairment at all.  They likely borrowed the tag from a relative or something.

There is a reason those spots exists.  To make use of them when you don't need them is reprehensible.
To pile snow in them, and prevent people from using them is just as bad.

While I agree with you mostly (and this is why I don't have one yet: my condition is not yet bad enough that I think I should be taking up that parking) you should be careful about this. Not all disabilities are equally visible to a stranger. For example, I wear leg braces that can be totally concealed under my pants. Although for the most part I agree that there are a lot of people abusing these permits by using ones issued to someone else, etc, I would never go an confront someone in public over it unless I KNEW that's what they were doing. Because there are invisible disabilities.

Yeah, I understand that.  And I have made the initial mistake of thinking someone was poaching a space at first, only to see them limping in an odd manner.  Or, to see someone park, who is just fine, but then help their 900 year old grandmother out of the back seat. In those cases, I take my bad feelings back.

But I've seen people who are perfectly healthy pull up, pull the tag out of the glove box just to hang it on the mirror, and almost jog into the store.  I so feel like giving those people a punch in the kidney.


I'm in a wheelchair right now and will be for about another month or so. The local mall here has very few handicap spots.  Last time we went there I had to have my husband drop me off at the curb and find a place to park. If I was tring to go out by myself I would have either driven around for an hour hoping someone left or just went home. I'm also learning how horrible access able most places seem to be. Sure there is a ramp but it's down a dark snow filled alley
 
2014-02-17 01:01:43 PM  

LarryDan43: How come my hover round isn't made better for snow?


Doesn't a hoverround hover *above* the snow?

\that'd be cool
\\like snow
 
2014-02-17 01:04:56 PM  

Bedstead Polisher: Mael99: GoodyearPimp: Alphakronik: Call me insensitive, but if the handicapped are truly equal to everyone else, they can park like everyone else without special spots up front.

I'll go one further -- handicapped folks aren't allowed to park in normal spots.  This should be enforced as much as the other direction.

So for once THEY know what its like to not be able to park within a mile of the store!  I just love seeing row upon row of empty parking spaces with "handicap only" on them while I push a cart past them on my 20 minute hike back to my car.

You're all trolling right?


Maybe. But I will admit having noticed FAR more handicapped spaces than are necessary at times. Most notably the four spaces in front of the convenience store near my house. ALL FOUR. It was kind of hilarious to routinely see mini traffic jams in the rest of the parking lot while all of the spots in front remained open. Also noteworthy are the quarter mile of handicapped spots (always at least 1/2 empty and usually 9/10) hoardes of people walk past on the way into Six Flags.

///I generally park far away; my legs work fine, walking is good for me, door dings suck. I'm not against a lot of handicapped spaces. But at times objectively it seems there are far more than there should be.
 
2014-02-17 01:09:08 PM  
I've taken to digging out the handicapped spot at my apartment complex. I figure my neighbor who parks there won't be getting out to do it herself, so someone should.

It's a nice sentiment, except after I did that two days in a row, the douche bag who parked next to her took all the heavy snow from his spot and dumped it behind her car. It froze the next night, so now she has this dense pile of ice/snow chunks piled up to her bumper. Unless she gets the maintenance staff to take some real tools to it, she's waiting for it to melt; my shovel wasn't doing the job.

I don't get people sometimes.
 
2014-02-17 01:09:23 PM  
Umm, the sun came out and it all went away.  Took two das longer than normal, but such is life.
 
2014-02-17 01:15:38 PM  

Jument: MaritimeGirl: I'm guessing that parking lots aren't typically designed to allow for snowbanks in North Carolina?

Well, no parking lots are. When it becomes a problem, it's just plowed in a pile somewhere. Usually they do this far away from the doors because, duh, having huge piles of snow where everyone is walking and parking is inconvenient. I'm guessing the plow folks are just lazy/incompetent.


And probably overworked . In the south it's common to employ landscape crews to help out in bad weather . These guys could have been landscaping all day and got called into action if the snow came that evening . The operator may not have been thinking straight or cared after putting in 18 hours with another couple of hours to go.
 
2014-02-17 01:17:59 PM  

HotWingConspiracy: They're also the kind of people that look at handicapped parking spaces and think "Man, handicapped people have it good".


Hilarious
 
2014-02-17 01:20:19 PM  

hstein3: I've taken to digging out the handicapped spot at my apartment complex. I figure my neighbor who parks there won't be getting out to do it herself, so someone should.

It's a nice sentiment, except after I did that two days in a row, the douche bag who parked next to her took all the heavy snow from his spot and dumped it behind her car. It froze the next night, so now she has this dense pile of ice/snow chunks piled up to her bumper. Unless she gets the maintenance staff to take some real tools to it, she's waiting for it to melt; my shovel wasn't doing the job.

I don't get people sometimes.


Go get a bottle of "Magic Shell" dessert topping from your ice cream type aisle at the store. Apply this to the jerkoffs windshield when it is nice and cold out tonight.

Watch the hilarity from your window the following morning.
 
2014-02-17 01:21:54 PM  
Maybe the snow has a right to be in the handicapped space. It fell and cannot walk or run. When it is able to run it will no longer need or occupy the handicapped space.
 
2014-02-17 01:22:28 PM  

notatrollorami: Maybe. But I will admit having noticed FAR more handicapped spaces than are necessary at times. Most notably the four spaces in front of the convenience store near my house. ALL FOUR. It was kind of hilarious to routinely see mini traffic jams in the rest of the parking lot while all of the spots in front remained open. Also noteworthy are the quarter mile of handicapped spots (always at least 1/2 empty and usually 9/10) hoardes of people walk past on the way into Six Flags.

///I generally park far away; my legs work fine, walking is good for me, door dings suck. I'm not against a lot of handicapped spaces. But at times objectively it seems there are far more than there should be.


The goal of the regulations on the number of handicapped spaces is to ensure that there are always some available. Sometimes that leads to them being under-utilized, but again, that's not really a big deal. Able-bodied people are perfectly able to walk a little further, and it's good for them anyway, as you point out. Now it's true that sometimes there may well be too many for a particular lot, but that's not that big a deal.
 
2014-02-17 01:31:18 PM  

Dafatone: Crass and Jaded Mother Farker: baconbeard: People in the South aren't very smart, are they?

My weather forecast this week:

[ftpcontent4.worldnow.com image 600x450]

Buffalo, NY's weather forecast this week:

[media2.wivb.com image 640x360]

But WE'RE the dummies.

/"That's right Christie, keep telling yourself that."

...you realize that Buffalo is 300+ miles from Jersey, right?


Not Christie:

24.media.tumblr.com

Christie:

web-images.chacha.com
 
2014-02-17 01:32:23 PM  

Psylence: hstein3: I've taken to digging out the handicapped spot at my apartment complex. I figure my neighbor who parks there won't be getting out to do it herself, so someone should.

It's a nice sentiment, except after I did that two days in a row, the douche bag who parked next to her took all the heavy snow from his spot and dumped it behind her car. It froze the next night, so now she has this dense pile of ice/snow chunks piled up to her bumper. Unless she gets the maintenance staff to take some real tools to it, she's waiting for it to melt; my shovel wasn't doing the job.

I don't get people sometimes.

Go get a bottle of "Magic Shell" dessert topping from your ice cream type aisle at the store. Apply this to the jerkoffs windshield when it is nice and cold out tonight.

Watch the hilarity from your window the following morning.


How frequently is your newsletter published? And will my subscription include both hardcopy and electronic formats?
 
2014-02-17 01:37:46 PM  
It's kind of funny... there are six or eight handicapped spaces at my gym, and usually one or two are taken.  The spaces generally have marked off lanes for easier egress on either side, and I think that's the main advantage to them, rather than proximity to the door.  There are a couple of regulars who tool around the gym in wheelchairs and I'm sure those spaces are helpful to them.

On the other hand, there are always a few regular folks cruising the lot looking for the closest possible parking spot.  At the gym.  Where they've presumably come to exercise.
 
2014-02-17 01:41:38 PM  

Mnemia: Alphakronik: Call me insensitive, but if the handicapped are truly equal to everyone else, they can park like everyone else without special spots up front.

No one says that they are "equal to everyone else" in capabilities. They CANNOT do certain activities, like walking long distances easily, like everyone else. That's the point.

The point of handicapped spaces isn't to give some sort of consolation prize or perk to people who were unlucky enough to end up disabled. The point is that without them they may be entirely unable to perform certain tasks unassisted. If there isn't a close spot available when you pull into Wal-Mart to buy your HFCS juice, you can just park further away and walk. Some disabled people would simply have to leave and come back. That's why there are generally enough handicapped spots to guarantee that some will be available at all times. You should feel lucky that you're able to walk any distance to your car rather than resentful that you're walking past empty handicapped spots, because I guarantee you that most handicapped people would gladly trade with you if they could.


Doesn't make sense. The spots are the same as regular spots just closer to the store. If they have to go 60 ft instead of 20 is it really any different? You make it sound like they physically cannot do without that close spot, and have to leave because of that and come back wtf u smoking?
 
2014-02-17 01:53:27 PM  

Mnemia: notatrollorami: Maybe. But I will admit having noticed FAR more handicapped spaces than are necessary at times. Most notably the four spaces in front of the convenience store near my house. ALL FOUR. It was kind of hilarious to routinely see mini traffic jams in the rest of the parking lot while all of the spots in front remained open. Also noteworthy are the quarter mile of handicapped spots (always at least 1/2 empty and usually 9/10) hoardes of people walk past on the way into Six Flags.

///I generally park far away; my legs work fine, walking is good for me, door dings suck. I'm not against a lot of handicapped spaces. But at times objectively it seems there are far more than there should be.

The goal of the regulations on the number of handicapped spaces is to ensure that there are always some available. Sometimes that leads to them being under-utilized, but again, that's not really a big deal. Able-bodied people are perfectly able to walk a little further, and it's good for them anyway, as you point out. Now it's true that sometimes there may well be too many for a particular lot, but that's not that big a deal.


Agreed on all counts. When I notice it's generally from a comedic perspective.
 
2014-02-17 01:54:27 PM  
Mralterego:
Doesn't make sense. The spots are the same as regular spots just closer to the store. If they have to go 60 ft instead of 20 is it really any different? You make it sound like they physically cannot do without that close spot, and have to leave because of that and come back wtf u smoking?

In many cases, NO, they are not "exactly the same as regular spots just closer to the store". They often have side access for wheelchair lifts and so on in otherwise closely packed parking lots.

Again, the point of the regulation is not to make the entire parking be utilized to the max all the time. The point is to make those spots available all the time. You just haven't thought about this carefully from the perspective of the people the spots are meant to help (or you're just trolling; I don't care which). And by your same argument, if an able-bodied person is forced to walk 60 feet rather than 20, what difference does it make? They are more able to do so, so it's no big deal that there are empty handicapped spots.
 
2014-02-17 01:59:06 PM  

Mralterego: If they have to go 60 ft instead of 20 is it really any different?


If everyone could park within 40 ft of the handicapped spots, nobody would be biatching about it.
 
2014-02-17 02:11:34 PM  

Mnemia: Mralterego:
Doesn't make sense. The spots are the same as regular spots just closer to the store. If they have to go 60 ft instead of 20 is it really any different? You make it sound like they physically cannot do without that close spot, and have to leave because of that and come back wtf u smoking?

In many cases, NO, they are not "exactly the same as regular spots just closer to the store". They often have side access for wheelchair lifts and so on in otherwise closely packed parking lots.

Again, the point of the regulation is not to make the entire parking be utilized to the max all the time. The point is to make those spots available all the time. You just haven't thought about this carefully from the perspective of the people the spots are meant to help (or you're just trolling; I don't care which). And by your same argument, if an able-bodied person is forced to walk 60 feet rather than 20, what difference does it make? They are more able to do so, so it's no big deal that there are empty handicapped spots.


I agree with u if the spots have side access, but I see literally dozens that are standard spots in the front of the lot that cause crazy jams that increase risk of accidents 10 fold. They should just have the middle front be handicap with side access and not all the front spots across the lot. That's my issue, nothing about being lazy just how people drive like farktards in parking lots due to them..
 
2014-02-17 02:14:36 PM  

aseras: They just need an ADA troll to try and park and then nail them with half a dozen lawsuits for $1K statutory damages each. They'll stop doing it.


I was thinking that the city should charge 250.00 per spot per day.

That's what the posted fine is.
 
2014-02-17 02:18:50 PM  

Mralterego: Mnemia: Mralterego:
Doesn't make sense. The spots are the same as regular spots just closer to the store. If they have to go 60 ft instead of 20 is it really any different? You make it sound like they physically cannot do without that close spot, and have to leave because of that and come back wtf u smoking?

In many cases, NO, they are not "exactly the same as regular spots just closer to the store". They often have side access for wheelchair lifts and so on in otherwise closely packed parking lots.

Again, the point of the regulation is not to make the entire parking be utilized to the max all the time. The point is to make those spots available all the time. You just haven't thought about this carefully from the perspective of the people the spots are meant to help (or you're just trolling; I don't care which). And by your same argument, if an able-bodied person is forced to walk 60 feet rather than 20, what difference does it make? They are more able to do so, so it's no big deal that there are empty handicapped spots.

I agree with u if the spots have side access, but I see literally dozens that are standard spots in the front of the lot that cause crazy jams that increase risk of accidents 10 fold. They should just have the middle front be handicap with side access and not all the front spots across the lot. That's my issue, nothing about being lazy just how people drive like farktards in parking lots due to them..


Ever tried to load/ unload a wheelchair with another car parked 8 inches away from you?
 
2014-02-17 02:20:28 PM  
The Bloods have all the snowplows.

static.fjcdn.com
 
2014-02-17 02:20:41 PM  

Mralterego: Mnemia: Mralterego:
I agree with u if the spots have side access, but I see literally dozens that are standard spots in the front of the lot that cause crazy jams that increase risk of accidents 10 fold. They should just have the middle front be handicap with side access and not all the front spots across the lot. That's my issue, nothing about being lazy just how people drive like farktards in parking lots due to them..


I think you are wrongly attributing the "people drive like farktards" bit to handicapped spaces. I attribute that just to a general "most people are farktards" conclusion. If the risk of accidents is increasing 10 fold, then that's because people are driving like idiots (it doesn't really: you just made that number up). And those people would continue to drive like idiots no matter what you did to parking lots.
 
2014-02-17 02:21:04 PM  

Crass and Jaded Mother Farker: baconbeard: People in the South aren't very smart, are they?

My weather forecast this week:

[ftpcontent4.worldnow.com image 600x450]

Buffalo, NY's weather forecast this week:

[media2.wivb.com image 640x360]

But WE'RE the dummies.

/"That's right Christie, keep telling yourself that."


yeah... but you live in the south.

So no matter what else, you lose.
 
2014-02-17 02:22:20 PM  
Did anyone else picture the woman who yelled at Elaine for giving muffin stumps to the homeless?
 
2014-02-17 02:23:48 PM  

Belias: Headline:  Snow piles cover handicapped spots across city

Photos: Different angles of the same pile in the same parking spot.

Sensationalist headline, or laziest photographer of all time?


/whynotboth.jpg
 
2014-02-17 02:30:54 PM  

Private_Citizen: The Googles Do Nothing: Are the handicapped people making handicapped faces?

I was thinking the same thing!


handicapped feces.
 
2014-02-17 02:33:53 PM  

La Maudite: I suppose it's my turn to be the humorless twat who points out that handicapped spaces are actually, you know, kind of important for handicapped people.

Back when my dad was still alive, his MS left him barely able to walk with the help of a cane on one side and my mom holding him up on the other side... but my mom's agoraphobia meant she couldn't go to the store without him. She wasn't in such great shape herself, with diabetic neuropathy and having had part of one foot amputated. Nevertheless, they both grew up during the Great Depression and were stubbornly self-reliant. They were determined to take care of themselves, no matter what.

A couple of neighborhood kids would shovel their walkway when it snowed, but they absolutely insisted on going to the store themselves. In snowy or icy weather, even making it to the front of the store from a handicapped space was incredibly difficult and could take 10-15 minutes. Once inside, my dad could hang onto a cart for support while my mom shopped.

I have to admit, that really wouldn't be my choice if I were in their condition, nor would it have been my choice for them if I'd had any say -- but there was no arguing with them. My dad clung to his dignity to the very end, and the only reason my mom isn't still living alone and doing her own grocery shopping is that she's in the hospital on dialysis, and that's only been for the last three or four months.

So not only is it shiatty that people are dumping snow in the handicapped spaces, it *is* newsworthy, because if you're like my parents and you're sitting at home watching the news and see that the handicapped spaces at the local mall are full of snow, you know not to waste your time inching your way out to the car and driving on icy roads, because you won't be able to park when you get there.

Damn it.

/Yes, my dad could have used a wheelchair instead. He did use one at home, but he refused to be seen outside the house with it because he felt it was undignified. If you e ...


Your dad was FDR?  :*)
 
2014-02-17 02:51:06 PM  

booger42: La Maudite: I suppose it's my turn to be the humorless twat who points out that handicapped spaces are actually, you know, kind of important for handicapped people.

Back when my dad was still alive, his MS left him barely able to walk with the help of a cane on one side and my mom holding him up on the other side... but my mom's agoraphobia meant she couldn't go to the store without him. She wasn't in such great shape herself, with diabetic neuropathy and having had part of one foot amputated. Nevertheless, they both grew up during the Great Depression and were stubbornly self-reliant. They were determined to take care of themselves, no matter what. ...

Your dad was FDR?  :*)



Maybe, maybe not... but I think my dad is doing his best to carry on in the same spirit as La Maudite's father.

/We're taking him for a CAT scan of his head after he finally admitted he's fallen twice this week (no cane for him, nosirree bob!) and now he "just doesn't feel right."
//stubborn as a mule, he is
///so I come by it honestly
////slashies
 
2014-02-17 02:53:54 PM  
hey look the mods approved another anti South link.  fark approved links are becoming as lame as FB status updates from old relatives and days later.
 
2014-02-17 02:56:47 PM  

durbnpoisn: Handicapped spaces are among the few things I actually agree with in terms of parking lot design.  So much to a point that it really does make me nuts when I see some jerkoff park in one of those spaces, with nothing more than a tag hanging from their mirror, and they obviously have no physical impairment at all.  They likely borrowed the tag from a relative or something.

There is a reason those spots exists.  To make use of them when you don't need them is reprehensible.
To pile snow in them, and prevent people from using them is just as bad.


There are reasons to use the spots that are not viable impairments. Arthritis is one of them.
 
2014-02-17 02:58:33 PM  

whatsupchuck: It's kind of funny... there are six or eight handicapped spaces at my gym, and usually one or two are taken.  The spaces generally have marked off lanes for easier egress on either side, and I think that's the main advantage to them, rather than proximity to the door.  There are a couple of regulars who tool around the gym in wheelchairs and I'm sure those spaces are helpful to them.

On the other hand, there are always a few regular folks cruising the lot looking for the closest possible parking spot.  At the gym.  Where they've presumably come to exercise.


www.dieselsc.com
 
2014-02-17 03:00:35 PM  

Gwendolyn: durbnpoisn: Mnemia: durbnpoisn: Handicapped spaces are among the few things I actually agree with in terms of parking lot design.  So much to a point that it really does make me nuts when I see some jerkoff park in one of those spaces, with nothing more than a tag hanging from their mirror, and they obviously have no physical impairment at all.  They likely borrowed the tag from a relative or something.

There is a reason those spots exists.  To make use of them when you don't need them is reprehensible.
To pile snow in them, and prevent people from using them is just as bad.

While I agree with you mostly (and this is why I don't have one yet: my condition is not yet bad enough that I think I should be taking up that parking) you should be careful about this. Not all disabilities are equally visible to a stranger. For example, I wear leg braces that can be totally concealed under my pants. Although for the most part I agree that there are a lot of people abusing these permits by using ones issued to someone else, etc, I would never go an confront someone in public over it unless I KNEW that's what they were doing. Because there are invisible disabilities.

Yeah, I understand that.  And I have made the initial mistake of thinking someone was poaching a space at first, only to see them limping in an odd manner.  Or, to see someone park, who is just fine, but then help their 900 year old grandmother out of the back seat. In those cases, I take my bad feelings back.

But I've seen people who are perfectly healthy pull up, pull the tag out of the glove box just to hang it on the mirror, and almost jog into the store.  I so feel like giving those people a punch in the kidney.

I'm in a wheelchair right now and will be for about another month or so. The local mall here has very few handicap spots.  Last time we went there I had to have my husband drop me off at the curb and find a place to park. If I was tring to go out by myself I would have either driven around for an hour hoping someone left or just went home. I'm also learning how horrible access able most places seem to be. Sure there is a ramp but it's down a dark snow filled alley


That's what we always did for my grandma, even with a tag. Why not make her life easier dropping her off st the door then parking.
 
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