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(YouTube)   Apparently, every news anchor in America had the same Valentine's day message   (youtube.com ) divider line
    More: Followup, Valentine's Day, newscasters, Conan O'Brien  
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3370 clicks; posted to Video » on 16 Feb 2014 at 8:21 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



17 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2014-02-16 08:44:37 AM  
Yes, they all get the same news service. Interesting though was the variety of newscaster talent displayed in that piece.
 
2014-02-16 08:53:48 AM  
I think it was a paid ad pretending to be news.
 
2014-02-16 10:23:25 AM  

thesharkman: Yes, they all get the same news service. Interesting though was the variety of newscaster talent displayed in that piece.


OK, so what news service is that?  AP?  Reuters?  Some more specialized service that serves the "local" TV market?

It's damn strange to see TV newscasts from competing networks and in disparate locations reading what's obviously the same script.  Not unbelievable, but strange.
 
2014-02-16 10:28:35 AM  

TheHighlandHowler: I think it was a paid ad pretending to be news.


Just about EVERYTHING is a paid ad pretending to be news.
 
2014-02-16 10:40:15 AM  
It was lazy stations taking what is called a Video News Release (VNR) sent out by a PR agency on behalf of a client, in this case, the maker of some stupid phone app.   The VNR is a pre-made kit of scripts and b-roll video clips meant to make it super-easy for a TV news station to cover a particular story by adding a bit of local footage and customizing the materials.  However, only idiots run the script and footage as given, because... well.... THIS happens.
 
2014-02-16 10:58:36 AM  
And this happens every day sheeple.
 
2014-02-16 11:16:25 AM  

SansNeural: thesharkman: Yes, they all get the same news service. Interesting though was the variety of newscaster talent displayed in that piece.

OK, so what news service is that?  AP?  Reuters?  Some more specialized service that serves the "local" TV market?

It's damn strange to see TV newscasts from competing networks and in disparate locations reading what's obviously the same script.  Not unbelievable, but strange.


At the local news level, unless they're getting stories from the network's news service, this kind of thing can also be determined by station ownership (i.e., all the stations owned by a media group, like Scripps, use the same service.)

One example is CNN Newssource .  You download their script and plug it into the teleprompter.  Sometimes it comes with B-roll video too.
 
2014-02-16 11:54:06 AM  

Any Pie Left: It was lazy stations taking what is called a Video News Release (VNR) sent out by a PR agency on behalf of a client, in this case, the maker of some stupid phone app.   The VNR is a pre-made kit of scripts and b-roll video clips meant to make it super-easy for a TV news station to cover a particular story by adding a bit of local footage and customizing the materials.  However, only idiots run the script and footage as given, because... well.... THIS happens.


Actually, I'd love to get that sort of publicity for my stupid phone app... any ideas on what PR company they used to get that sort of coverage? How much does that cost? I have two apps that are compelling in their own ways, and somewhat worthy of being filler on local newscasts (seriously), but mired in obscurity. Good PR is the difference between Flappy Bird circa February 2013 and Flappy Bird circa February 2014.
 
2014-02-16 12:30:34 PM  
Lesser Evil: You might try Fleishman-Hilliard, but it will cost you. Really, any agency can put one together, but the trick is to have a good method of distributing it and getting news directors to bite on it.  There is a place online where you can store your VNR for a fee, and then stations go there when they are looking for filler material and download it free. You get a monthly report on how many times it was downloaded and by which stations. I'm trying to remember, there are several of these services out there, one was run by DG and called Pathfire, but DG just got bought up by a larger network. Which may not be bad, because them Pathfire pushes the story to more news desks than before, lowering your CPM.

If I can give you some advice, the kind of stuff most likely to get used, offers a wide demographic appeal, and is offered, not as a pre-made VSOT, but as a "construction kit" of clips with several interviews and a ton of b-roll. Offer additional sources for more details, and maybe a chance to skype interview your developers. or book a satellite "tour" for a bit more money.  That way, every station can edit the parts in a unique way. real news directors are afraid to use canned pre-edited packages for fear of looking like when tyo women show up to a party in the same dress.
 
2014-02-16 12:44:57 PM  

Any Pie Left: Lesser Evil: You might try Fleishman-Hilliard, but it will cost you. Really, any agency can put one together, but the trick is to have a good method of distributing it and getting news directors to bite on it.  There is a place online where you can store your VNR for a fee, and then stations go there when they are looking for filler material and download it free. You get a monthly report on how many times it was downloaded and by which stations. I'm trying to remember, there are several of these services out there, one was run by DG and called Pathfire, but DG just got bought up by a larger network. Which may not be bad, because them Pathfire pushes the story to more news desks than before, lowering your CPM.

If I can give you some advice, the kind of stuff most likely to get used, offers a wide demographic appeal, and is offered, not as a pre-made VSOT, but as a "construction kit" of clips with several interviews and a ton of b-roll. Offer additional sources for more details, and maybe a chance to skype interview your developers. or book a satellite "tour" for a bit more money.  That way, every station can edit the parts in a unique way. real news directors are afraid to use canned pre-edited packages for fear of looking like when tyo women show up to a party in the same dress.


Thanks for the info and advice. I'm pretty low-budget, being a single developer outfit, but I have come to the conclusion I need to promote my apps better. It's kind of disheartening to get hounded by shady sites and companies who are willing to "review" your app... for a price.

Definitely taking the advice on creating clips as promotional tools. Something from which a complete package can be made by somebody who might have their own take.
 
2014-02-16 01:07:53 PM  
Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media (1988), by Edward S. Herman and Noam Chomsky, is an analysis of the news media, arguing that the mass media of the United States "are effective and powerful ideological institutions that carry out a system-supportive propaganda function by reliance on market forces, internalized assumptions, and self-censorship, and without overt coercion ENABLED BY TERRIBLY LAZY JOURNALISTS.
 
2014-02-16 05:34:21 PM  
 At least he didn't say Skin Flute

/ the 216 represent!
 
2014-02-16 07:30:45 PM  
Lesson learned: No matter what channel, what network you watch, you're always getting the same story, what "they" want you to hear. Everywhere, every day.
 
2014-02-16 07:47:43 PM  

SansNeural: thesharkman: Yes, they all get the same news service. Interesting though was the variety of newscaster talent displayed in that piece.

OK, so what news service is that?  AP?  Reuters?  Some more specialized service that serves the "local" TV market?

It's damn strange to see TV newscasts from competing networks and in disparate locations reading what's obviously the same script.  Not unbelievable, but strange.


A lot of those stations are owned by the same company.

Saw a lot of Sinclair and Nexstar owned stations as well as some Gannett and Hearst as well. I imagine it's something the corporate wing of those companies passes onto their stations to report on.

Sinclair especially uses something like this for more blantantly political things.
 
2014-02-16 10:02:38 PM  
There is a problem with news sources uncritically re-reading or paraphrasing press releases, but this seems to reflect something more deeply structural in newsrooms.

To cut costs, they seem to sign up for an outsourced newsroom service called Journatic, which researches stories, prepares the scripts, and prepares the video sections for newsrooms. NPR did a piece on this a while ago, and Conan is following it up for laughs (and doing a much better job at spreading the word about it).

See this piece for more  http://www.alternet.org/media/hilarious-and-depressing-video-exposes- h ow-phony-local-tv-news-has-become, and this piece for more  http://www.poynter.org/latest-news/top-stories/179555/journatic-staff e r-takes-this-american-life-inside-outsourced-journalism/
 
2014-02-17 01:31:06 AM  
Those with a special someone may look to their mobile knife to help them say "I stab you."
 
2014-02-17 03:16:31 AM  

SansNeural: thesharkman: Yes, they all get the same news service. Interesting though was the variety of newscaster talent displayed in that piece.

OK, so what news service is that?  AP?  Reuters?  Some more specialized service that serves the "local" TV market?

It's damn strange to see TV newscasts from competing networks and in disparate locations reading what's obviously the same script.  Not unbelievable, but strange.


I believe it. I've been seeing this same sort of journalistic parroting for over a decade now. The big media drumbeat to start the war in Iraq was the first examples.
 
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